Mba724 s4 2 qualitative research
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Mba724 s4 2 qualitative research

on

  • 1,159 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,159
Views on SlideShare
1,159
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Mba724 s4 2 qualitative research Mba724 s4 2 qualitative research Document Transcript

  • 1
  • Qualitative research is not as widely accepted as quantitative research because it’s often considered not “scientific” or “objective” enough. It’s also often confused as no more than personal or biased opinions.Managers like numbers. They like unequivocal evidence supporting one approach vs. anotherQualitative findings are too fuzzy, too subjective, too specific about single cases You’ve probably read about well‐known businesses, such as Google, GE, or Enron. How do we know, for example, what we learned from the Enron was not a one‐off exception. How do we know, for example, that a company with very similar governance structures would end up with the same fate as Enron?Fortunately, there are ways to address theses concerns by improving the rigor of the qualitative approach.For example, you should carefully review prior literature, learn from other people’s experience and avoid repeating obvious mistakesYou can also be more clever about how you select your sample. Make sure you include contrasting cases, for example, can help you strengthen your arguments. When you can compare data across different contexts, the reader can be more confident with your conclusion. 2
  • This slide highlights many of the qualitative techniques that are useful for data collection. These six methods are to be discussed in the rest of this lecture1) Grounded Theory is based on individual depth interviews. The researcher looks for repeating themes  that could shed light on the phenomenon being studied and that may eventually lead to proposing a  theory. If the final purpose of the study is not developing theory but just understanding the  phenomenon, this method may be called simply “Individual Depth Interviews (IDIs)” The Corbin  and  Strauss interviews with Vietnam war veterans is an example of using individual interviews for grounded  theory2) Group Interviews consist of interviewing more than one participant at once. Also, participants are  encouraged to interact by the moderator based on the idea that this interaction will lead to richer data.  There may be a need for several group interviews3) Focus groups are panels of people led by a trained moderator and with direct research sponsor’s  involvement. The meetings tend to be long (about 2 hours) and because of this specific activities (e.g.  free association– what word comes to your mind when you see this picture?) are used to elicit deeper  feelings, knowledge and motivations. Focus groups are usually used as an exploratory methodology4) Case Study. Combines different methodologies such as interviews, observations, document analysis, etc. The goal is to obtain multiple perspectives of a single organization, situation, event, or process at a point in time or over a period of time 5) Ethnography consists of the collaboration of interviewer and participant in the field. The interviewer will participate in the situation under study. For example, should I want to study how managers decide how to prioritize and allocate resources, I could ask for a “job” in a manager’s office, and ask the manager why he/she decided to follow a specific action whenever a decision situation occurs. 6) Observation refers –as the name implies‐ to the use of observation of a phenomenon to understand it. For example, if we want to learn how strangers get to socialize with each other, we may install ourselves in a place where this situation may occur (e.g. the waiting room of a doctor’s office) and observe carefully the interaction that develops.  3
  • The last item is what you need to be aware of but they are not going to be discussed in the rest of the lectures.7) Action Research refers to the solution of complex but practical problems about which little is known by studying the specific situation. For example, we may want to study if employees have gotten upset by the imposition of a specific security policy and if they are obeying it. 3
  • The next two slides discuss the different formats/types of interviews 4
  • In an unstructured interview, there are no specific questions or order of topics to be discussed. Each interview is customized to each participant. In a semistructured interview, there are a few standard questions but the individual is allowed to deviate based on his or her answers and thought processes. The interviewer’s role is to probe. In a structured interview, the interview guide is detailed and specifies question order, and the way questions are to be asked. These interviews permit more direct comparability of responses and maintain interviewer neutrality.Most qualitative research relies on the unstructured or semistructured interview format. Again please be reminded that these interview methods can be used for grounded theory 5
  • Exhibit 7‐5.  Focus on the individual interview which is easier to manage for the MFF capstone project, although both methods are frequently used in business research. There are advantages and disadvantages associated with these two options. Group interviews can be more time efficient than individual interviews. However as discussed on page 177 of the Cooper textbook, the group format also presents significant challenges – When speaking in front of others, people can be worried about protecting their own egos, being politically correct, or fitting in (what we call “group think”). The group can also be easily dominated by a few outspoken participants or go off track without strong group facilitation.Again please be reminded that these interview methods can be used for grounded theory 6
  • You may think that you have read case studies before. Harvard business press, newspapers, and big companies all publish case studies. We’ve been reading the WorldCom case study for other classes. So are those “qualitative research?”Turns out that not all “case studies” are the same. In order for a “case study” report to be considered qualitative research, the author must be very careful about its reasoning logic in the analysis. The author should also try to build a theory (e.g., based on what we read in an interview with Google executives, we can theorize that companies with a strong emphasis on meritocracy will be more innovative) that can be applied to or tested with other cases (e.g., would the theory apply to all companies that emphasize meritocracy?)The Harvard Business cases you have read so far in this MBA program are written for you, the reader, to theorize and analyze. The author presents the facts, not analysis. Therefore, it serves more like “data” for a qualitative researcher, rather than a qualitative research report.Journalists often write in‐depth reports on high profile cases like Enron, along with their own analyses. Their work can sometimes be very objective, insightful and logically sound. However, keep in mind that the journalist’s primary goal is to tell a story rather than build a scientific theory. At the end of the day, what’s newsworthy would be the most important priority for the journalist. 7
  • Observational studies can differ in terms of the extent to which the researcher participates in the phenomena that s/he is observing.1. Complete Participant.   The researcher is part of the group being studied and is not identified as such. An  example would be the famous case of Festinger and colleagues joining a UFO cult and participating in  their activities to study the sociology of belief which was later published as “When prophecies fail” :  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_Prophecy_Fails1. Complete Observer. This is the other extreme, the observer does not participate at all in the activities of  the people being studied. For example, we could sit in a strategic location (ideally hidden) at lunch time  to study the social interaction of children during their break.2. Observer as Participant.  In this case, the researcher (the observer) is integrated into the team but  his/her status is clear. A simple example could be the role of embedded journalists during the Iraq war  that has resulted in a large number of books about the sociological aspects of this war. Similarly, University of Pittsburgh professor Kathleen Blee observed women in Ku Klux Klan by participating in the  KKK activities without being a KKK member. Her work is documented in the book “Women of the Klan.”3. Participant as Observer. In this case the observer is skilled enough to do the same job, at least up to a  point, as the rest of the participants but his/her role as researcher is fully identified for all the parties  involved. The researcher is quite aware of the contextual meaning of things taking place. 8
  • As discussed earlier, ethnography consists of the collaboration of interviewer and participant in the field. The interviewer will participate in the situation under study. Although this and the next slide are not necessarily specific to fraud and forensics (with the notable exception of “Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street” by Karen Ho), we have included them here so you get a better feeling of how ethnography has been used in business in general. There are two dominant applications of ethnography:“Corporate anthropology” – which focuses on understanding organizational behavior, and “consumer anthropology” –which observes consumer behavior for product innovation or marketing purposesXerox, for example, was one of the pioneers in corporate anthropology. Anthropologist Julian Orr spent hundreds of hours watching technicians fixing Xerox machines, and developed lots of insights about how work can be restructured to improve productivity and employee satisfaction. The knowledge sharing system Eureka that Dr. Chung studied for her dissertation work was developed partly as a result of Orr’s work.Companies such as P&G and Kodak have invested a lot resources in qualitative consumer research. The Swift disposable mop, and the feminine product Tampax Pearl both came out of qualitative research. Kodak also performs qualitative research on many of their digital cameras.Qualitative research is so useful that many design shops now specialize in qualitative consulting services. Maya design, for example, a Pittsburgh‐based design shop, specializes in “user‐centered design” – which is a type of qualitative researchCheck out the YouTube video listed on the slide. With their field research of “soccer moms” for an SUV manufacturer, they discovered what these moms really needed – a firewall for their cars! [Stop the youtube video at 1:36] 9
  • Another famous example of a consumer product designed based on anthropology research is the PT cruiserUnfortunately this car has been discontinued as of 2009It was originally designed based on the recommendations of Dr. Rapaille, a French‐born medical anthropologist and psychiatrist.He presumably came up with the design recommendations based on his clients’ report on their deepest desires for a car, when these clients were lying in a dark room. I wonder if Sigmund Freud ever considered corporate consulting as another stream of revenue!http://archives.cnn.com/2001/CAREER/dayonthejob/05/23/corp.anthropologist.idg/http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/02/27/pt‐cruiser‐from‐hero‐to‐zero/?apage=2 10
  • The general sampling guideline for qualitative research is to keep sampling as long as your breadth and depth of knowledge of the issue under study is expanding (this approach is also called theoretical sampling), and stop when you gain no new knowledge or insights (called theoretical saturation). In other words, a qualitative researcher will stop sampling (e.g. interviewing)  when he or she has reached data redundancy.For example, Corbin  and Strauss– in their textbook on grounded theory‐ interviewed a Vietnam veteran to understand the experience of the participants in this war. During the interview this participant mentioned his pride of serving his country (he volunteered) and how different the attitude of conscript soldiers was. This suggested to Corbin that now she had to add conscript veterans to her sample. This second participant mentioned the traumatic experience of killing his first enemy combatant and how those who have never killed anybody cannot understand. This suggested to Corbin that besides the consideration of volunteer/non‐volunteer she would need to interview both veterans who had actually killed enemy soldiers and those who had not. Notice that this also means the need for additional questions to the new type of participant. After this, she did not find any new themes (insights) from the ones she had already identified (e.g. pride of serving, killing experience) and for this reason she limited her sampling to the above participants (however, in practice, a well‐developed interview study may involve up to 32 participants).Harvard Business Cases you have been reading can be considered as “data” for a qualitative study. However, it is not in itself a rigorous qualitative research study because:1. The purpose is to educate and therefore the analysis is left out from the reader’s view on purpose2. It’s a single isolated case and therefore is useful but insufficient by itself for a rigorous qualitative  researcher to build a theory without having other points of reference 11
  • Surveys don’t always give you the answers you want, becauseSampling bias is prevalent – we can only sample who we knowFor example, our MBA survey shows that people only want evening classes Based on this information, the school decides to not offer Saturday classes However, is it possible that because our program is an evening program Our students, naturally, are those who prefer evening programs Those who prefer Saturday programs would never go to Carlow MBABy sampling our own “customers,” we never understand what other customers may want. At the same time, these same customers keep telling us the same thing, because they are the ones happy with the current offerings  hard to generate new insightMore importantly, people usually don’t know what they want until you give them a product that they crave (Does the iPhone ring the bell?). Did you ever long for listening to music while jogging in the park? (it may seem natural to you now but nobody thought anyone would need a walkman before the invention of the Sony walkman, or an iPhone until its invention)Qualitative research, on the other hand, often generates insights that are not available from quantitative research However, doing qualitative research the right way is not easy or trivial  hence “corporate anthropologists”Understanding how to combine qualitative and quantitative research gives companies competitive advantageMore and more organizations are jumping on the bandwagonIs your organization keeping up with this trend? How can you apply the qualitative methods to build new insights about fraud and forensics? 12