Mba724 s4 2 correlation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Mba724 s4 2 correlation

on

  • 504 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
504
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
504
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Mba724 s4 2 correlation Mba724 s4 2 correlation Document Transcript

    • 1
    • 2
    • We are making a big assumption here – that the relationship is a straight lineWouldn’t life be so much easier if all relationships are straight lines? 3
    • The Pearson correlation r is a numeric index of the relationship between two numeric variablesCaution: if a variable is categorical (e.g., gender – male vs. female; ethic – white, black, asian) you cannot correlate it with another variable. Pearson r can only be calculated between two number variables (e.g., age, salary, height, weight)R tells us how much the relationship is a straight lineThese graphs are possible ways two variables relate to one anotherThe more the graph looks like a straight line, the stronger the r value isThe graphs that resemble a circle indicate very low or even no correlation between the two variablesThe direction of the line indicates whether the correlation is positive or negativeIf the line goes up to the right, it’s a positive relationship (meaning, when X goes up, Y goes up too)If the line goes down to the right, it’s a negative relationship (meaning, when X goes up, Y goes down)For example, if when we get older, we also get wiser. If this is true, that means there should be a positive and strong Pearson correlation r between the age variable and the wisdom variable. 4
    • If we are less happy when we have more money, that means there should be a negative Pearson correlation r between the happiness variable and the money variable 4
    • As you can see from these charts, Pearson correlation r becomes stronger as the data points cluster more tightly around a straight lineWhen the data points are distributed like a round circle, that means the X and Y variables have little relationship to each otherNote that most of these (except for the first one) have positive correlations, although some of them are weaker (more rounded) than others (more straight lines) 5
    • The same principle applies to the negative correlations. The trend goes down to the right when the correlation is negative 6
    • Again to summarize there are two components to the correlation value:It’s direction, and it’s strengthWhat kind of correlation are you predicting for your group project? 7
    • Caution:Correlation measures the linear relationship between two variablesWhen the assumption of normality is violated, weird things happenThis slide illustrates 4 different datasets all with the same correlationThe moral of the story is that we should always inspect the scatterplot when running correlations. Numbers should be interpreted sensibly 8
    • We can never stress enough that correlation is not the same as causationOne of my favorite examples by a student is about shoe size and intelligence. A positive correlation was found between shoe size and intelligence levels leading people to think that bigger feet = smarter people. Then they realized that bigger shoe size also generally means older people and in fact it wasn’t the size of peoples’ feet that was causing increased intelligence, it was simply the fact that they were older and therefore scored higher on tests! 9
    • We all want to have a positive relationship with our family, friends, coworkers, etc. Who wants a negative relationship, right?In that spirit, why would anyone want a negative correlation? And we should celebrate every time we have a positive correlation, right?How about a positive correlation between GDP and obesity level? How about a positive correlation between smoking and cancer? How about a positive correlation between the CEO’s compensation and corruption level? Now let’s look at some negative correlations that are supposed to be “depressing:” more exercise associated with lower levels of obesity, more education associated with lower crime rate, fewer meetings associated increased productivity, and, how about more relaxing weekends associated with lower stress levels?What’s the moral of the story? Correlation is what it is – it’s a number that indicates the strength and direction of a relationship between two numerical variables. Whether the relationship is good for the mankind or not is beyond the scope of the humble little number’s job! 10
    • Assigning numbers to categorical variables do not make them numeric variablesThis is because we can only do math with numeric variables. Basic math principles don’t apply to categorical variables, even if they have numbers associated with them.For example, 1+1=2In the gender case, this means that if you add a female and another female together, that’s equal to a male.Another math principle is that 2 is twice as big as 1In the gender case, that would mean that a male is twice as big as a female.All this madness would happen if we try to use categorical variables in numeric ways.Keep in mind that the Pearson correlation r value is calculated based on a math formula. If you try to feed the gender variables into SPSS as numbers, SPSS can calculate a Pearson correlation value for you but using that number requires you to make the kinds of crazy assumptions illustrated above 11