Mba724 s2 w1 scientific reasoning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
477
On Slideshare
477
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Welcome to class! 1
  • 2. 2
  • 3. 3
  • 4. Changed “interpret” for “enhanced”  4
  • 5. Can you come up with your own examples of deductive reasoning?Some potential answers are:1. General Tso’s chicken is sweet. All sweet food has sugar in it. Therefore, General Tso’s chicken must be made with sugar.2. All cookies are baked with an oven. Fortune cookies are a kind of cookies. Therefore, to  make fortune cookies, we much bake with an oven.3. All large corporations are likely to experience fraud. Worldcom is a large corporation. 3 All large corporations are likely to experience fraud Worldcom is a large corporation Therefore, Worldcom is likely to experience fraud4. All humans are prone to make biased decisions. Accountants are humans. Therefore,  accountants are likely to make biased decisions When deductive reasoning is employed, it may be possible to develop theories that can be  tested empirically (e.g. observing a large sample of accountants to confirm that they  make biased decisions) 5
  • 6. Many newspapers and politicians fall into this trap of providing true premises but that they are not related to the conclusion in a deductive way! See if you can come up with some examples!Deductive reasoning is also called deductive logic.Notice that the key condition for a valid inference is that the premises are true. However, in  the following inference:All students work hard on the courseWorking hard on the course is enough to pass the courseTherefore, all students will pass the courseAs you can easily notice, this inference is not valid because the first premise “All students…”  is not true (not all students work hard on the course). Similarly, the second premise is  also false (working hard is not enough to pass the course, you need to master the key  concepts). Therefore, the conclusion cannot be held true in light of the stated premises.Can you provide your own example of a failed (or non‐deductive) inference in the context  of your group project? 6
  • 7. •The word “objects” is used in a very general sense, it could also mean events or situations• Some students may quickly realize the potential problems with this type of reasoning. Nicolas Taleb provides an excellent example in his book “The Black Swan” when he shows the inductive reasoning of a turkey the day before thanksgiving! ( “I have been lavishly fed during the past 364 days; therefore, I will be fed up lavishly tomorrow!” says the turkey). However, when you think about it, this is what we do all the time when we try to forecast business trends (e.g. using regression) !business trends (e g using regression) !Another example would be “I have never known of anyone using diebetes pumps in my 20 years working here, therefore, I will not see any pump usage any time soon” 7
  • 8. • Whenever science performs an experiment and generalizes the result to the wholepopulation, it is using inductive approach. For example, it has been determined (by examining ill people) that people suffering from Down syndrome have 47 chromosomes (instead of 46). To say that ALL Down syndrome patients have 47 chromosomes is inductive reasoning because not ALL Down syndrome patients in the world have been examined.•Until the eighteenth century, Europeans thought that all swans were white. Black swans were not discovered until Europeans settled in Australia and New Zealand. This is the were not discovered until Europeans settled in Australia and New Zealand This is theopening line of Nicolas Taleb’s popular book “Black Swan” that argues about the limitations of our predictive methods (based on induction reasoning). • On the other hand, we could not live without inductive reasoning. For example, when I turn the steering wheel to the right, my car turns to the right; I am going to turn the steering wheel to the right now; therefore, my car will turn in to the right. My reasoning is based on my observation of the car doing so countless times in the past. As can be seen, it would not be possible to drive if we were questioning what would happen every time we turn the steering wheel!  [The point of view that inductive logic was necessary and perhaps more natural for people was made by David Hume who argued for a practical skepticism; that is, rather than stating that inductive reasoning cannot provide true conclusions, we should use common sense (like in the case of arguing if the sun will rise tomorrow) in its use. However, others such as Karl Popper have denied even the possibility of such as thing use. However, others such as Karl Popper have denied even the possibility of such as thingas inductive reasoning. Now you may start to suspect why I said earlier that we can never prove a hypothesis to be true, only that it is false. The answer is given by the problem of inductive reasoning as illustrated by the black swan example. If this is not clear yet, do not despair, we will get back to this problem in the next slide ]•Most applied research uses inductive inference. For example, you study a company or a  8 f i df thi li t th t f th i Si il l
  • 9. • Popper argued that you can never prove anything to be right (even if you show that an apple falls to the ground each time you try the experiment, you can never be certain that this will always be true. Certainly, the apple will not fall if you are in the Space). However, Popper said that you can prove if something is false (if the apple doesn’t fall to the floor just once it means that the statement “apples left to themselves fall to the ground”). This approach was proposed by Popper in The Logic of Scientific Discovery in 1934 and is the one currently accepted.• Notice that when we say that a theory is falsifiable means that we can prove it to be wrong. For example; in physics, the 17th century “phlogiston theory” that posited the existence of a fire‐like substance, phlogiston, present in combustible material has been proved false through multiple experiments.  Why we cannot prove a theory to be true? Because, if the result of an experiment shows that conclusion A is “true,” we could replicate the experiment to confirm it but the question is  how many experiments we would need to perform to make sure our conclusion is true. The answer would be the whole universe of possibilities because we need only one situation to prove the whole theory wrong. If this doesn’t seem to make sense, think about an experiment, raising a swan to see what color it turns out to be. You could have thousands of experiments that would turn out white swans; however, if you move to New Zealand, the swans there could also be black 9
  • 10. The previous philosophical discussion (yeah! We were doing philosophy of science) is important for practical purposes because it indicates there are two approaches to business research: Deductive (deducing hypotheses from existing theory) o Inductive (deducing hypotheses from existing data or experimentation). Both are equally useful in business research and can be used separately or even combined. 10
  • 11. Can you identify deductive and inductive reasoning processes in your thinking about the group project? 11