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History of Graphic Design
Chinese Prints•   Invention of paper in 105 AD•   To enable Chinese scholars to study    their scriptures, the classic tex...
Ukiyo-e Prints
Sacred Texts, Renaissance, Reformation                     Gutenberg Press,1440
Prints as Fine Art  Rembrandt, 1547    Albrecht Durer, 1510
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec 1892World’s Fair Influence in Printmaking
Industrial RevolutionWhat kind of influence would theindustrial revolution in the early 1800’shave on design?
VICTORIAN 1820-1910• Frills• Cluttered• Warm  colors/textures• Modest femininity• Font: Capital  letters,   –    serif, th...
FINE ART: Impressionism
Arts and Crafts• Back to Middle Ages• Straight lines     – with soft curves•   Harder contour•   Clean•   Negative Space• ...
FINE ART: Post-Impressionism
Art Nouveau 1910-20•   Use of figure/ground relationship•   Stone Lithography based on woodcut•   Thick to thin sweeping l...
FINE ART: Post-Impressionism
Art Deco 1920-30•   Progressive women’s movement•   Speed     –   Automobile, train     –   space•   Egyptian motif•   Cri...
FINE ART: Cubism
Abstract Modernism 1930’s• Futurism•   Dadaism•   Pressing forward•   Expressionism•   Randomness•   Chance•   Collage/pho...
FINE ART: Surrealism
Abstract Modernism 1940’s• De Stijl   – Straight black lines   – Basic shapes   – Artists fled to Holland to   avoid World...
FINE ART: Mark Rothko
1950’s Mid Century Modern•   Advertisements switch to youth•   National t.v.•   Magazines•   Design curriculum in college•...
FINE ART: Pop Art
1960’s-70’s•Hallucinogenic Drugs•Peace Campaigns•Bright Colors•Mixed Media•Japanese Prints•Eastern Influence
FINE ART: Op Art
1980-90’s•   In your face advertising•   Photography•   Style over substance•   Sex sells•   Use of supermodels and stars•...
FINE ART: Performance Art
Early 21st Century•   Mixed media•   Technology•   Photography•   Style over substance•   Anti-advertising•   Layers, text...
FINE ART: Installation art
present•   Clean lines•   Simple compositions -space•   Return to early modernism•   Use of nostalgia for humor•   Limited...
FINE ART:
History of graphic design
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History of graphic design

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History of graphic design for high school

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  • (pictures of the floating world) representative of things that are fleeting –seasons, time, nature etc 17th century
  • One book in the 1400’s would cost as much as a whole farm! The need for biblical examination, the growth of literacy during the Renaissance, the desire to create large volumes of literature during a rebirth of thinking after the middle ages. The mechanical systems involved were first assembled in Germany by the goldsmithJohannes Gutenberg around 1440, based on existing screw-presses used to press cloth, grapes, etc. and possibly prints.[1] Gutenberg was the first in WesternEurope to develop a printing press.During the Renaissance era, printing methods based on Gutenberg's printing press spread rapidly throughout first Europe and then the rest of the world. It eventually replaced most versions of block printing, making it the most used format of modern movable type, until being superseded by the advent of offset printing.Modern Moveable Type –the gutenberg
  • What is the artist trying to communicate even in fine art?
  • To enable Chinese scholars to study their scriptures, the classic texts and accompanying holy images were carved onto huge, flat stone slabs. After the lines were incised, damp paper was pressed and molded on the surface, so that the paper was held in the incised lines. Ink was applied, and the paper was then carefully removed. The resulting image appeared as white lines on a black background. In this technique lies the very conception of printing. The development of printing continued with the spread of Buddhism from India to China; images and text were printed on paper from a single block. This method of combining text and image is called block-book printing.
  • Middle class now rose, and had expendable moneyNeed for selling products, mass production, retail, mail order, catalogue
  • Before the shopping mall, people went into a store to buy specific items. They were not out on display most of the time.The development of leisure time created a great interest in the social function of shopping. This grew particularly in the 1800’s in Paris and New York City. Charles Worth, a clothing designer was one of the first to advertise his clothes, through illustrations and catalogues.
  • Catalogue advertisements
  • Gauguin
  • Look at the coca cola- although they are similar in style to their other ads, the female is sportinga chic hat, with a wing In it, she has bobbed hair and makeup, she is in the background equal with men and industry. The arrow adds to the “speed”
  • World War I was oppressive to the German artists. There was a strong movement to leave behind the past and propoganda materials that was all about a message. The movement aimed to detach completely from the past and look to the future by calling for the destruction of museums and libraries. It promoted a new beauty of speed through aggressive means. This was an important movement because of the current fragmented state of Italy. The state felt behind both economically and culturally. The people needed to become excited about the 20th century and what was to come after being shaken by a world war. Marinetti felt that the only way to do this was to cause an international stir to promote this change and used Paris as a platform to publish the Futurist Manifesto, Le Figaro in 1909.  After a few years of recruiting artists and allowing Futurism to take shape, Marinetti published the sound poem ZangTumbTumb in 1914. It is a graphic account of the Battle of Tripoli and uses expressive typography with poetic impressions to illustrate the repetition of the drumbeat of war as a powerful machine. The method and formal elements of this work were quite influential in modernist print and the emerging culture of the European Avant-garde.
  • Youth have money now, and ads are going to encourage the spending of it.Quick and easy directed towards working moms
  • OrlanFamous paintings and sculptures of women combined to find what is perfection for women?
  • Transcript of "History of graphic design"

    1. 1. History of Graphic Design
    2. 2. Chinese Prints• Invention of paper in 105 AD• To enable Chinese scholars to study their scriptures, the classic texts and accompanying holy images were carved onto huge, flat stone slabs. After the lines were incised, damp paper was pressed and molded on the surface, so that the paper was held in the incised lines. Ink was applied, and the paper was then carefully removed. The resulting image appeared as white lines on a black background. In this technique lies the very conception of printing. The development of printing continued with the spread of Buddhism from India to China; images and text were printed on paper from a single block. This method of combining text and image is called block-book printing.
    3. 3. Ukiyo-e Prints
    4. 4. Sacred Texts, Renaissance, Reformation Gutenberg Press,1440
    5. 5. Prints as Fine Art Rembrandt, 1547 Albrecht Durer, 1510
    6. 6. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec 1892World’s Fair Influence in Printmaking
    7. 7. Industrial RevolutionWhat kind of influence would theindustrial revolution in the early 1800’shave on design?
    8. 8. VICTORIAN 1820-1910• Frills• Cluttered• Warm colors/textures• Modest femininity• Font: Capital letters, – serif, thick, readable
    9. 9. FINE ART: Impressionism
    10. 10. Arts and Crafts• Back to Middle Ages• Straight lines – with soft curves• Harder contour• Clean• Negative Space• Woodcut feel• Font: gothic, serif
    11. 11. FINE ART: Post-Impressionism
    12. 12. Art Nouveau 1910-20• Use of figure/ground relationship• Stone Lithography based on woodcut• Thick to thin sweeping lines• Organic/nature themes and symbols• Feminine, fairies• Contour lines• Layers• Font: sweeping, thick and thin, serif
    13. 13. FINE ART: Post-Impressionism
    14. 14. Art Deco 1920-30• Progressive women’s movement• Speed – Automobile, train – space• Egyptian motif• Crisp, tailored• Louder, solid colors• Font: san serif, thick
    15. 15. FINE ART: Cubism
    16. 16. Abstract Modernism 1930’s• Futurism• Dadaism• Pressing forward• Expressionism• Randomness• Chance• Collage/photos• Artists as designers• Intentional disorder• Font: CAPITAL letters – random, various – languages, many fontsanamanapia, san serif
    17. 17. FINE ART: Surrealism
    18. 18. Abstract Modernism 1940’s• De Stijl – Straight black lines – Basic shapes – Artists fled to Holland to avoid World War I Font: Straight san serif• Bauhaus -balance of art and design -clean, functional forms Font: “logical” san serif
    19. 19. FINE ART: Mark Rothko
    20. 20. 1950’s Mid Century Modern• Advertisements switch to youth• National t.v.• Magazines• Design curriculum in college• Leisure and family• Cheerful optimism after WWII• Working mom’s – Influences advertisement• Font: variety, tag lines, story plots
    21. 21. FINE ART: Pop Art
    22. 22. 1960’s-70’s•Hallucinogenic Drugs•Peace Campaigns•Bright Colors•Mixed Media•Japanese Prints•Eastern Influence
    23. 23. FINE ART: Op Art
    24. 24. 1980-90’s• In your face advertising• Photography• Style over substance• Sex sells• Use of supermodels and stars• Bold colors
    25. 25. FINE ART: Performance Art
    26. 26. Early 21st Century• Mixed media• Technology• Photography• Style over substance• Anti-advertising• Layers, textures, random• Humor and Horror
    27. 27. FINE ART: Installation art
    28. 28. present• Clean lines• Simple compositions -space• Return to early modernism• Use of nostalgia for humor• Limited resources for models – Use of illustration and silk screen• Green Design – Less about the consumer, more about the world/environment - About empathy
    29. 29. FINE ART:
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