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Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
Ancient art
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Ancient art

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Jr high ancient art powerpointe

Jr high ancient art powerpointe

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  • Sumerian Diety from Temple 2900 BC
  • 7”inch water jar with Octopus motif 1500BC Minoan The pottery of this period is characterized by an exuberant joy in nature; the motifs are more naturalistic and there is a greater sense of movement.  There is no three-dimensional illusionism, rather the impact of the painting comes from the shapes of the motifs and their relationship to the vessel's shape and contours.  The marine elements, like the octopus (cuttlefish), work well because their shapes are simple, irregular and sinuous, and thus allow a ready transition to two dimensional form
  • Slightly earlier than the Octopus Stirrup Jar, this Lily vase indicates the development of a preoccupation with natural subjects and a naturalistic advance in representational art.  Like many subjects of the Late Minoan period the lilies perhaps took their inspiration from wall paintings--a mural from Amnissos has this same lily motif which transfers well to the surface of pottery.  The small clump of leaves at the bottom where the vase is at its narrowest expands upward into blossoms where the vase reaches it widest circumference.
  • Assyrian Art 883 BC Lamassu from Citadel of Assurnasirpal II, Nimrud 2Kings 19:5-19
  • Dying Lioness 850 BC from walls of Palace
  • Panel in walls of Assyrian Palace 850 BC
  • Babylonian Art -the Ishtar Gate 500 BC as the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon . It was constructed in about 575 BC by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II on the north side of the city. Dedicated to the Assyrian goddess Ishtar , read Jeremiah 51:58
  • Ancient Egyptian society was obsessed with immortality, and much of what is known about ancient Egypt comes from tombs that have survived to the present day. Egyptians believed that the pharaoh's spirit was immortal, and they filled his tomb with every earthly delight for it to enjoy throughout eternity. Wealthy members of the nobility, although not immortal like the pharaoh, sometimes took their earthly possessions to their tombs with them. Paintings, sculptures, and other objects found in these tombs represent almost everything we know about Egyptian art.
  • One of the most familiar images associated with the tomb art of ancient Egypt is the funerary scene, which depicts what happens after a person dies. Beginning at the upper left, the deceased appears before a panel of 14 judges to account for the deeds of his lifetime. The "ankh" or "key of life" is held by some of the judges. Below them, the jackal god Anubis (representing the underworld and mummification) leads the deceased before a set of scales to weigh his heart against the feather of Ma'at, goddess of truth and justice. If the heart is heavier than the feather, it means that the deceased has a heart that is heavy with evil deeds in which case the god Ammit (with crocodile head and hippopotamus legs) will devour the heart and condemn the deceased to eternal oblivion. If the heart is lighter than the feather, it means that the deceased has led a righteous life and may be presented to Osiris to join the afterlife. Thoth, the ibis-headed god of wisdom, stands to the right of the scales, waiting to record the results of the weighing test. The falcon-headed god Horus (representing the pharaoh during life) then leads the deceased to Osiris, lord of the underworld, who is seated on the throne at the right (representing the pharaoh after death). Osiris is shown as a mummy, and on his head is the white crown of Lower Egypt. He holds the symbols of the pharaoh in his hands --the shepherd's crook symbolizes his role as shepherd of mankind, and the flail symbolizes his ability to separate the wheat from the chaff. Behind him stand Isis and her sister Nephthys who, together with Osiris, will welcome the deceased to the underworld.
  • Inside the tomb there were seven golden shrines.    There were many hidden treasures such as King Tut's furniture, thrones, jewelry, beds, linens, chariot swords, statues of Tut, Egyptian Gods, animals and toys.  All these things were meant to be used in after life.  Inside King Tut's burial chamber was his most famous treasure, The Golden Death Mask.
  • King Tut was just a boy when he mysterioursly died
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