Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana
I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana
I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana
I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana
I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana

1,099

Published on

Emily Hooper Lansana’s story tells us about her educational journey growing up in …

Emily Hooper Lansana’s story tells us about her educational journey growing up in
a house where her parents always wanted her to have access to the best.
Growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, she learned a lot about the ways that kids of
different races were separated, and separated themselves, at school.
From voluntary busing to being called an “Oreo”, Lansana navigates the color lines
until she finally lands with the theatre kids who move more easily between
different groups. During high school, a guest speaker challenged her to think in
new ways about racism and stereotypes and after his visit, Lansana and her friends
formed a student group to talk with elementary school students about friendship
and peer pressure and how it should be okay to cross lines to be friends with
anyone you want.
When the time comes to consider college, Lansana remembers her father’s dream
that she attend Yale. She doesn’t think she’ll make it and even her guidance
counselor tells her it’ll be tough for her, but she applies anyway and gets
accepted. Once at Yale, Lansana makes new friends, studies African American
Intellectuals with Cornell West, and she comes more fully into herself, finally accepting that she, like everyone,
deserves the best. Lansana looks back over her journey and wonders how her life might have been different if she
had always believed that to be true. It is through this new understanding that Lansana understands what racial
justice is all about – making everyone feel that wherever they walk – they deserve to be there.
Visit www.racebridgesforschools.com to download the
corresponding audio (MP3) and video (MP4) files.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,099
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. I DESERVE TO BE HEREby Storyteller Emily Hooper-Lansana• www.emilyhooper.com THEME Crossing Color Lines to Reach for your Best. STORY SUMMARYEmily Hooper Lansana’s story tells us about her educational journey growing up ina house where her parents always wanted her to have access to the best.Growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, she learned a lot about the ways that kids ofdifferent races were separated, and separated themselves, at school.From voluntary busing to being called an “Oreo”, Lansana navigates the color linesuntil she finally lands with the theatre kids who move more easily betweendifferent groups. During high school, a guest speaker challenged her to think innew ways about racism and stereotypes and after his visit, Lansana and her friendsformed a student group to talk with elementary school students about friendshipand peer pressure and how it should be okay to cross lines to be friends withanyone you want.When the time comes to consider college, Lansana remembers her father’s dream Emilythat she attend Yale. She doesn’t think she’ll make it and even her guidance Hooper-Lansanacounselor tells her it’ll be tough for her, but she applies anyway and getsaccepted. Once at Yale, Lansana makes new friends, studies African AmericanIntellectuals with Cornell West, and she comes more fully into herself, finally accepting that she, like everyone,deserves the best. Lansana looks back over her journey and wonders how her life might have been different if shehad always believed that to be true. It is through this new understanding that Lansana understands what racialjustice is all about – making everyone feel that wherever they walk – they deserve to be there. Visit www.racebridgesforschools.com to download the corresponding audio (MP3) and video (MP4) files. Approximate Length of Video and Audio: 7 minutes 55 seconds
  • 2. STORY SHORT: I Deserve to Be Here Page 2 REFLECTIONS & DISCUSSION QUESTIONS ABOUT I Deserve to Be Here 1) Emily Hooper-Lansana remembers the night when her friend from school called to say, “Listen, I wanted you to know that…you have too many white friends. You are an Oreo so, I can’t talk to you at school.” This is just one example of the color lines that get drawn in this story. What are the other examples of color lines that define and influence Hooper-Lansana’s educational journey? How does Hooper-Lansana respond and cope given the ways that people interact (or don’t) from different races? How are the lines drawn at your school? How do you navigate them? 2) During high school, Hooper-Lansana describes a guest speaker at school who gave “the most horrible racist tirade” she had ever heard and then revealed to them that he was black. The surprise and challenge of this moment stirred up so much feeling that Hooper-Lansana and her friends were motivated to form a student group to fight racism. Our motivations to do social justice work or to create positive change can come from surprising places. 3) When was a time in your own life when you were so angry or surprised or shocked or excited that you were motivated to create change? What was it about that moment that motivated you? What action did you take?.Taking ActionTurn Emily Hooper-Lansana questions on yourself. How would your life change if you walked into each situationin your day thinking “I deserve to be here?” How would it change the way you walk? How would it change theway you speak? How would it change the way that you access opportunities that come your way?What can you do today to make yourself feel that wherever you walk you deserve to be there? What can you dotoday to offer this acceptance to others?
  • 3. STORY SHORT: I Deserve to Be Here Page 3 STORY TRANSCRIPT of I Deserve to Be Here by Storyteller Emily Hooper-LansanaNote : The transcript below of the video and audio story is not in correct text book English. It is atranscription of the spoken story. There are also a few variations from the spoken word. This text is foryour guidance and reference as you start to study and think about this story.My name is Emily Hooper Lansana and this story is called – I Deserve To Be Here. It is about my educationaljourney.I was born in 1966 in Shaker Heights, Ohio. And my parents moved to Shaker Heights, because they wanted toprovide us access to opportunities that had been elusive for black people. My parents believed in education andthey wanted to give us the best possible.Well, in Shaker Heights there were a group of people who decided that the response to desegregation that theywanted to go for was voluntary busing. My father was on a committee and they decided the best age for this was4th grade and so my sister was among the first group of students to be bussed. My parents were not completelysatisfied with the experience and I discovered this when at the end of 3rd grade I was told that they were going tokeep me at the neighborhood school. There was only one problem, I had seen that bus and I wanted to get on it.I wanted to see what I was missing and so after a lot of back and forth and back and forth my parents relentedand I rode that bus. Twenty minutes across town to a completely different world. A few months into the schoolyear I came home after making some friends and having some play dates and I announced to my father, “I want tolive in a big house like my friends”. And my father said “no, you don’t”. And I said, “no, really, I want to move. Iwant to live in a big house like they do”. And my father said, “no, you don’t” and I said “why not?” and my fathersaid “Baby, you know, you got to watch out for those big houses, because a lot of the time, they are haunted”.And I believed him.My father has a way of making us feel that who we were and what we had was enough. He wanted us to believethat we could do anything. So, in my house when I was growing up, I was not allowed to say the word “can’t”. Inmy father’s book, “can’t” was a curse word and he reacted to it as he would to any other curse word. I was aboutten years old before I realized this was not the case in every house, but that’s the way it was in mine.In elementary school when I was choosing friends I didn’t spent a lot of time thinking about white friends or blackfriends, we were just friends. And then I went to junior high school and the entire social landscape changed.Racial lines were drawn and you had to be careful about crossing them. I found this out when one of my blackfriends called me on the phone at night and said, “Listen, I wanted you to know that, I kind of still want to befriends with you, but you have too many white friends you are an Oreo so, I can’t talk to you at school”. I hadnever heard the word Oreo used like that before and certainly didn’t think that I was one. I just thought that I hadfriends and I was keeping them.
  • 4. STORY SHORT: I Deserve to Be Here Page 4I struggled to navigate that climate and I finally found my place with the theatre people and then I went to highschool. And in high school things were pretty much the same, the black kids sat on one side of the cafeteria andthe white kids sat on the other side of the cafeteria and the theatre people and the athletes kind of were able tonegotiate between.Then, in my junior year of high school, there was a big assembly called and we were told that this assembly was tohonor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and that they had invited a guest speaker and when we walked in there was thisvery stately man who looked like Paul Newman and when he began to address the student body, he went into themost horrible racist tirade that I had never seen, stereotypes of black people and brown people that were justhorrible and when he was finished, we were broken up in to the discussion groups and we were told to share ourreactions to what we had seen.We were horrified, we were angry and we were hurt and when we came back into the auditorium, our guestspeaker revealed that actually he was black. And that he had made a decision to use the fact that most peopleassumed that he was white as a means of addressing serious racial issues. It worked, because it made us talk aboutthings that we never talked about before.And my group of friends decided that we wanted to do more than talk. We wanted to do something. So westarted what was called the Student Group on Race Relations. And the focus of our work was to have high schoolstudents go into elementary schools and talk to kids about friendship and peer pressure and the fact that it shouldbe okay to cross lines, to make friends, to be who you wanted to be.Well, then I needed to start that journey toward thinking about where I was going to college. My father passedaway the day before my 16th birthday and my father had always said, “My baby girl is going to grow up and go toYale.” There he was, wanting the best for me. I had no interest whatsoever in going to Yale. I didn’t think I’d behappy there, I didn’t think I was smart enough to go there, and my sister pushed me and pushed me because ofmy dad. And I finally went to my high school counselor and said I wanted to apply. And she said “Ah, that’s goingto be a far reach for you”.And I believed her. I sent the application off and I never thought again about it. I went to auditions for theatreschools and I was thinking about where I was going to go to theatre school when the letter came. I thought it wasa joke, really. I remember thinking oh, this is really funny. I put it on the table, I didn’t think about it and thenpeople started to call my mom and said “she is about to miss out on a really important opportunity” and so Ifound myself as a freshman at Yale. And there I started to make friends in a different way. I started to navigatethat landscape as a black student at Yale. And it was so important to me to do a good job. I felt like I was so luckyto be here, it was such a special opportunity. I didn’t want to fail anybody.One of my white friends from high school came to visit me and she said, “you know, it seems like you’ve gottenmore black at Yale”. That was pretty funny to be more black at Yale. Then I looked around and realized that nowI was sitting at the black table in the cafeteria. And I hadn’t thought about it that way anymore than I hadn’tthought about it that way in high school. I was just sitting with my friends. And I realized that these issues arevery complex in terms of when you look on the outside and say, these kids are here and these kids are here, andyou don’t realize what draws people together, why people make the friends they make and what they need anddraw from those friendships.
  • 5. STORY SHORT: I Deserve to Be Here Page 5In my senior year at Yale, I signed up to take a graduate level course with Cornell West. And the course wascalled “African American Intellectuals”. And in that class we learned about black people who had been greatwriters and thinkers and serious important visionaries. And how they’d gone to ivy league schools and thecontributions that they made to history and that class changed me, because I thought suddenly – imagine if I hadwalked into Yale as a freshman thinking, “I deserve to be here”. Not, “I’m lucky to be here and I got in byaccident and I got to be careful that I don’t mess up”, but “I deserve to be here”.How would it have changed the way that I walked?How would it have changed the way that I spoke?How would it have changed the way that I took access to those opportunities?I realized then for me that racial justice is about making everyone feel that wherever they walk – they deserve tobe there. ©2011 RaceBridges For Schools. This lesson plan is part of an initiative for educators called RaceBridges For Schools. It is a project that seeks to provide free tools for teachers and students to motivate them to build stronger and more inclusive communities. This guide may be freely used, reproduced and distributed for educational purposes as long as this copyright information is displayed intact. The video and audio excerpts and transcript included in this unit is copyrighted by Emily Hooper-Lansana. Used with permission: www.emilyhooper.com Info: www.racebridgesforschools.com

×