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SUCCESSFUL RAINWATER         HARVESTING SYSTEMSLessons Learned Capturing Water in Florida BRIAN GREGSON Rainwater Catchmen...
Outline INTRODUCTION OVERVIEW   Why harvest rainwater? ANATOMY COST - Brief REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS   AKA, “RED T...
Who we are        Irrigation Contractor: PCCLB 10280           Like to play in dirt           Specializing in highly ef...
What is rainwater harvesting?   Collecting rainwater   Storing rainwater   Using rainwater   Stormwater management    ...
Why harvest rainwater? Preserve potable water for  drinking and indoor uses Stormwater management L.I.D. Contribute to...
ANATOMY OF A RAINWATERHARVESTING SYSTEM
RWH System Anatomy                                                                                        Rain            ...
Catchment Roof acts as the catchment  area Size   Determines harvesting    potential Surface material                 ...
Conveyance & Pretreatment Water quality is determined  by what is conveyed into  the storage tank(s) Roof surface debris...
Conveyance & Pre-treatment    Leaf Guards              First line of defense    Screened rain heads              Finer...
First Flush Devices Downspout (wall-  mounted) Underground                                         http://www.rainharves...
Cistern Anatomy           Lid or manway           Secured tightly to avoid entrance           by children and animals.    ...
Distribution Select appropriate  pump/pressure tank for water  demand Connect to disinfected indoor  supply and/or irrig...
Distribution:                 COMPONENTS   Pump   Make-up valve   Backflow prevention   Controls                  www....
Treatment Water quality must meet appropriate  standards for intended application    Example: Indoor potable = NSF 53 (c...
Treatment: POTABLE Treatment processes   Sediment/filtration      2 or more stage + carbon      NSF 53 = cyst removal ...
Disinfection & Treatment:        EXAMPLE     www.rainwaterservices.com
Disinfection & Treatment:        EXAMPLE     www.rainwaterservices.com
Maintenance Responsibilities Check for debris in tank    Tank should be cleaned out about     once a year Inspect gutte...
DOLLARS & CENTS
Initial Investment Issues    Rule of Thumb     Cistern to Installation Cost Ratio                  60:40                  ...
Initial Investment Issues      www.rainwaterservices.com
RED TAPE
Regulatory Consideration Engineering, engineering, engineering Building codes   Graywater (for non-potable)   Plumbing...
Requirements for Successful          RWH Systems Proper design      Engineering      Controls      Distribution      ...
DOs & DON’Ts  or, “Lessons Learned”
Residential Home,St. Petersburg, FL                CISTERN                     INFO                      Size: 1,000 gallo...
LEED Elementary School    Remodel, St. Petersburg, FLProject Owner: Jordan Park Elementary Project Type: Institutional   C...
Residential – Potable (Laundry)      St. Petersburg, FL Project Owner: Private  Project Type: Potable indoor useCISTERN IN...
Luxury Waterfront –Toilets/Irrigation; St. Petersburg,FL   Project Owner: Private    Project Type: Non-Potable toilets  CI...
Luxury “Off-the-Grid – All water usage; Tampa, FL  Project Owner: Private   Project Type: Whole House Potable + Greywater ...
Apartment Complex – Irrigation;  Orlando, FLProject Owner: Private Project Type: Multifamily IrrigationCISTERN INFO       ...
Waterfront - Potable;   Pinellas County, FL Project Owner: Private  Project Type: Whole House PotableCISTERN INFO         ...
Requirements for Successful          RWH Systems Proper design      Engineering      Controls      Distribution      ...
Needs for further success Incentives!    Rebates    Watering restriction variances/exemptions    Higher water rates?? ...
Many thanks…www.rainwaterservices.com
Questions?       BRIAN GREGSON brian@rainwaterservices.com      @RainwaterServices         @RWServiceshttp://www.slideshar...
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Successful rwh in fl 050112

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Discussion of important requirements of successful rainwater harvesting systems. Includes examples of "lessons learned" from numerous interesting and innovative rainwater systems installed in Florida over 5 years.

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Transcript of "Successful rwh in fl 050112"

  1. 1. SUCCESSFUL RAINWATER HARVESTING SYSTEMSLessons Learned Capturing Water in Florida BRIAN GREGSON Rainwater Catchment Systems Accredited ProfessionalFlorida Water Resources ConferenceOrlando, FLMay 1st, 2012
  2. 2. Outline INTRODUCTION OVERVIEW  Why harvest rainwater? ANATOMY COST - Brief REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS  AKA, “RED TAPE” REQUIREMENTS FOR SUCCESSFUL RWH DOs & DON’Ts  Lessons Learned NOT DISCUSSED  Sizing/Design www.rainwaterservices.com
  3. 3. Who we are  Irrigation Contractor: PCCLB 10280  Like to play in dirt  Specializing in highly efficient water- conservation solutions  Drip/micro irrigation, landscape drainage  RAINWATER HARVESTING  FIRSTS:  ARCSA AP in State of FL  Permitted RHS in St. Pete  Potable RHS in St. Pete  Potable RHS in Tampa  Permitted greywater(??) in Tampa  LEARNED FROM TRIAL & ERROR…www.rainwaterservices.com
  4. 4. What is rainwater harvesting? Collecting rainwater Storing rainwater Using rainwater Stormwater management www.rainwaterservices.com
  5. 5. Why harvest rainwater? Preserve potable water for drinking and indoor uses Stormwater management L.I.D. Contribute to responsible growth Larger volume = greater $AVINGS & SAVINGS www.rainwaterservices.com
  6. 6. ANATOMY OF A RAINWATERHARVESTING SYSTEM
  7. 7. RWH System Anatomy Rain The ON button! Catchment Area Conveyance (roof) (gutters/downspouts) Pretreatment (screen filters, first-flush) Storage Treatment & (cistern) DistributionSource: Harvesting Water for Landscape Use by Patricia H.Waterfall, p. 34 Original diagram was modified for this application. www.rainwaterservices.com
  8. 8. Catchment Roof acts as the catchment area Size  Determines harvesting potential Surface material Courtesy: ARCSA  Determines quality  The slicker, the better For potable, metal is preferred www.rainwaterservices.com
  9. 9. Conveyance & Pretreatment Water quality is determined by what is conveyed into the storage tank(s) Roof surface debris  Twigs and leaves  Dust  Bird droppings  Other debris www.rainwaterservices.com
  10. 10. Conveyance & Pre-treatment  Leaf Guards  First line of defense  Screened rain heads  Finer, pre-tank protectionhttp://9p-enterprises.com/LSpics.aspx www.rainwaterservices.com
  11. 11. First Flush Devices Downspout (wall- mounted) Underground http://www.rainharvesting.com/ www.rainwaterservices.com
  12. 12. Cistern Anatomy Lid or manway Secured tightly to avoid entrance by children and animals. Vent Use fine mesh screen to keep mosquitoes out Inlet Overflow Max Water Level Use flap valve or other From downspouts methods to keep insects and animals out Turbulence calming Storage device (optional) (cistern) Floating To prevent remixing of Suction Filter sediment Outlet Tank Pad To distribution Anaerobic / Sediment Drain paciaSource: Rainwater Harvesting Planning and Installation Manual, January 2009, Figure 12.5. Original diagram was modified for this application. www.rainwaterservices.com
  13. 13. Distribution Select appropriate pump/pressure tank for water demand Connect to disinfected indoor supply and/or irrigation system Makeup water supply (if available) for low-water and/or poor water quality conditions Backflow prevention!!! Backflow prevention!!! www.rainwaterservices.com
  14. 14. Distribution: COMPONENTS Pump Make-up valve Backflow prevention Controls www.rainwaterservices.com
  15. 15. Treatment Water quality must meet appropriate standards for intended application  Example: Indoor potable = NSF 53 (cysts) + NSF 55A (UV) = VERY COMPLEX  Example: Indoor non-potable (toilets) = greywater dye injection = VERY COMPLEX IRRIGATION= MINIMAL TREATMENT  Particulate/sediment removal  Similar to well-water supplies  Subject to local regulationsAFTER TREATMENT, WATER QUALITY ISSUFFICIENT FOR INTENDEDAPPLICATION(S)! www.rainwaterservices.com
  16. 16. Treatment: POTABLE Treatment processes  Sediment/filtration  2 or more stage + carbon  NSF 53 = cyst removal  Disinfection  NSF 55A = UV treatment of surface water  Other disinfection options:  Chlorine, Ozone, RO, etc… All Rainwater Services potable systems meet NSF 53 and 55A www.rainwaterservices.com
  17. 17. Disinfection & Treatment: EXAMPLE www.rainwaterservices.com
  18. 18. Disinfection & Treatment: EXAMPLE www.rainwaterservices.com
  19. 19. Maintenance Responsibilities Check for debris in tank  Tank should be cleaned out about once a year Inspect gutters and downspouts regularly  Remove debris First flush bypass  Check drain holes are clear for proper function Inspect downspout seals and entrances Check for leaks Service pumps and filters as needed  Similar maintenance to well systems or pools www.rainwaterservices.com
  20. 20. DOLLARS & CENTS
  21. 21. Initial Investment Issues Rule of Thumb Cistern to Installation Cost Ratio 60:40 WERF User’s Guide to the BMP and LID Whole Life Cost Models, 2009 www.rainwaterservices.com
  22. 22. Initial Investment Issues www.rainwaterservices.com
  23. 23. RED TAPE
  24. 24. Regulatory Consideration Engineering, engineering, engineering Building codes  Graywater (for non-potable)  Plumbing  Electrical Health Departments  Local  State EPA: Guidelines for surface water treatment www.rainwaterservices.com
  25. 25. Requirements for Successful RWH Systems Proper design  Engineering  Controls  Distribution  Drainage Solid partnerships  Officials  Builders  Owners Knowledge Budget www.rainwaterservices.com
  26. 26. DOs & DON’Ts or, “Lessons Learned”
  27. 27. Residential Home,St. Petersburg, FL CISTERN INFO Size: 1,000 gallons Water Source: Rainwater Use: Irrigation FIRST SYSTEM PERMITTED AND APPROVED IN ST. PETE! LESSONS LEARNED: •Design •Proper sizing •Debris screening •Conveyance www.rainwaterservices.com
  28. 28. LEED Elementary School Remodel, St. Petersburg, FLProject Owner: Jordan Park Elementary Project Type: Institutional CISTERN INFO Size: 2x 2,500 gallonsWater Source: Rainwater Use: Toilet FlushingLESSONS LEARNED:•Play nice with others! •Engineers. Collaborators, Building officials•Toilet-flushing (non-potable) code complexities!•Build according to plan www.rainwaterservices.com
  29. 29. Residential – Potable (Laundry) St. Petersburg, FL Project Owner: Private Project Type: Potable indoor useCISTERN INFO Size: 2x 550 gallons Water Source: Rainwater Use: Toilets/LaundryST. PETE’S FIRST POTABLE SYSTEMLESSONS LEARNED:•Education!•Backflow concerns•Building code complexities www.rainwaterservices.com
  30. 30. Luxury Waterfront –Toilets/Irrigation; St. Petersburg,FL Project Owner: Private Project Type: Non-Potable toilets CISTERN INFO Size: 3x 850 gallons Water Source: Rainwater Use: Toilets/Irrigation LESSONS LEARNED: •Drainage! •Don’t rely on others •Complex controls www.rainwaterservices.com
  31. 31. Luxury “Off-the-Grid – All water usage; Tampa, FL Project Owner: Private Project Type: Whole House Potable + Greywater CISTERN INFO Size: 4x 1250 gallons Water Source: Rainwater Use: All applications + greywater tank for toilets RAINWATER SERVICES MOSTINNOVATIVE - HYBRID LESSONS LEARNED: •Utilization of unique architectural space •Controls (a common theme) •Greywater codes •Importance of first-flush www.rainwaterservices.com
  32. 32. Apartment Complex – Irrigation; Orlando, FLProject Owner: Private Project Type: Multifamily IrrigationCISTERN INFO Size: 1x 1300 gallons, underground Water Source: Rainwater Use: Irrigation + City BackupLESSONS LEARNED:•How to work in scorching Florida heat!•Understand geology•Underground = unknown!! www.rainwaterservices.com
  33. 33. Waterfront - Potable; Pinellas County, FL Project Owner: Private Project Type: Whole House PotableCISTERN INFO Size: 2x 3000 gallons Water Source: Rainwater Use: All applicationsJOB SITE ACCESSIBILITY!!!!LESSONS LEARNED:•Wear swimsuit to all jobsites!•Streamline controls•Permits aren’t always enough www.rainwaterservices.com
  34. 34. Requirements for Successful RWH Systems Proper design  Engineering  Controls  Distribution  Drainage Solid partnerships  Officials  Builders  Owners Knowledge Budget www.rainwaterservices.com
  35. 35. Needs for further success Incentives!  Rebates  Watering restriction variances/exemptions  Higher water rates?? (hold your tomatoes, please!) Better building codes  More uniformity  Better definitions  Clarifications Education  Officials  Construction pros (builders, architects, plumbers, irrigation contractors, etc…)  Homeowners www.rainwaterservices.com
  36. 36. Many thanks…www.rainwaterservices.com
  37. 37. Questions? BRIAN GREGSON brian@rainwaterservices.com @RainwaterServices @RWServiceshttp://www.slideshare.net/RWServices www.rainwaterservices.com

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