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Becoming a Web 2.0 Philanthropy October 6, 2009
Who we are <ul><li>Larry Blumenthal </li></ul><ul><li>Steve Downs </li></ul><ul><li>Marjorie Paloma </li></ul><ul><li>Susa...
Group charge <ul><li>As part of long-range strategic thinking: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to develop a vision for what RWJF wou...
Today’s Presentation <ul><li>What we’ve done </li></ul><ul><li>What we’ve learned </li></ul><ul><li>What we envision </li>...
What is Web 2.0?
What is Web 2.0?
 
What is Web 2.0? <ul><li>A different way  </li></ul><ul><li>of thinking  </li></ul><ul><li>and acting </li></ul>
What is Web 2.0? Collaboration  And  Participation
What is Web 2.0? Decentralized Ownership of Information
What is Web 2.0? Openness and Transparency
What is Web 2.0? Speed and  Immediacy
What is Web 2.0? Sharing Work in Progress
Our process…
What We’ve Learned <ul><li>Web 2.0 is:  </li></ul><ul><li>Highly relevant to our work </li></ul><ul><li>Not about the tool...
What About Control? You can increase impact by letting go.
What’s our vision?
Vision <ul><li>We’re in the know. </li></ul>
Vision <ul><li>We seed and engage in the important conversations of the day.  </li></ul>
Vision <ul><li>We seed and engage in the important conversations of the day.  </li></ul>
Vision <ul><li>We seek more feedback, more openly. </li></ul>
Our Vision <ul><li>We communicate using a network, not a broadcast model. </li></ul>
Our Vision <ul><li>We communicate using a network, not a broadcast model. </li></ul>
Our Vision  <ul><li>We make it easy for people to work with us.  </li></ul>…
Our Vision  <ul><li>We make it easy for people to work with us.  </li></ul>…
Our Vision  <ul><li>Our users do some of our work for us.  </li></ul>
Our Vision  <ul><li>Our users do some of our work for us.  </li></ul>
Our Vision  We cultivate our networks. RWJF GRANTEES IN D.C.
Our Vision  <ul><li>We adapt, based on the feedback we receive. </li></ul>
So … How do we get there?
Strategy <ul><li>Challenge:  develop a strategy for RWJF to: </li></ul><ul><li>effectively harness the potential contribut...
Strategy <ul><li>Challenge:  develop a strategy for RWJF to: </li></ul><ul><li>effectively harness the potential contribut...
<ul><li>“ Strategy is learned, not planned” </li></ul><ul><li>- Henry Mintzberg </li></ul>
Strategy push enable pull <ul><li>raise staff awareness and familiarity </li></ul><ul><li>ready the infrastructure </li></...
Strategy enable <ul><li>raise staff awareness and familiarity </li></ul><ul><li>ready the infrastructure </li></ul>
Strategy push <ul><li>web 2.0 for internal communications </li></ul><ul><li>bring the outside world in  </li></ul><ul><li>...
Internal communications
Internal communications
Ceci n’est pas un précis
Bring the outside world in attrition    Laura Leviton    obesity    Annual Report    directions    nursing    litera...
Bring the outside world in attrition    Laura Leviton    obesity    Annual Report    directions    nursing    litera...
Encourage experimentation <ul><li>Take key RWJF functions and perform them differently </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reviewing...
Strategy pull <ul><li>establish overarching metrics for what it means to be a web 2.0 organization </li></ul>
Reactions? <ul><li>To the vision: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is it appealing? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is it bol...
What you can do <ul><li>Start listening to sources (RSS, Twitter) </li></ul><ul><li>Get help & training:  </li></ul><ul><u...
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Becoming a Web 2.0 Philanthropy

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A presentation by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Web 2.0 Group outlining a vision for moving the foundation into a Web 2.0 world.

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  • Note Rosemary’s contribution
  • This past January, Erin Kelly from our Web team had a decision to make. Erin is an avid reader, and she was trying to decide which book to read next. There are a lot of ways she could make that decision, but she chose a path that is unique to the Web 2.0 world. Erin is an active user of Twitter, so she posed the question to her followers – her community – on Twitter.
  • Here is Erin’s request. No bodice ripping trashy romantic novels for our Erin. Because she took a different approach, Erin received an interesting response.
  • Within about 30 minutes, one of the authors – Patti Digh – weighed in recommending her book. That story illustrates a lot of things about Web 2.0. But there are two things in particular I think are worth pointing out: - A reliance on networks for getting work done. Erin had a decision to make, and the route she took was to tap in to the wisdom of her community. By doing that, she managed to quickly reach further and wider than she thought she could. It is a different world out there these days, and if you choose to connect you can get some powerful and unexpected results. So what exactly is Web 2.0?
  • Web 2.0 is a radically different way of thinking. A mindset that challenges some of the traditional ways we have done business as a foundation.
  • Web 2.0 is about embracing the concept that we can be more productive and may be more likely to hit on a solution if we work together to solve problems from the beginning. Some examples: Changemakers where we invite the field in to the process at an early stage.
  • In a Web 2.0 world, knowledge is developed together not by an isolated group of experts. It is the Wikipedia model of 12 million experts over Encyclopedia Britannica’s small group of recognized scholars. I know the Wikipedia model isn’t perfect, but research shows it is about as accurate as the other model and has the ability to self-correct much more quickly.
  • Web 2.0 is about being authentic in how you participate. It means being clear about who you are, what you are up to, what you know and what you don’t know. This is the MIT admissions page. MIT uses a group of student bloggers. They don’t edit them or the comments they receive. Why? Because high school students want an authentic look into life at MIT, not marketing material. For us, openness and transparency also mean being much clearer about how we make the sausage if we want help in improving the process.
  • The Web 2.0 world moves quickly, and it runs 24 hours a day, seven days a week. People expect fast responses to their questions. Projects are turned around in shorter time periods. Example: We made a grant to the Jane Fonda Center at Emory University through our Strong Start program last Wednesday morning. Jane Fonda herself tweeted about the experience within a few hours and then posted a blog entry. We “retweeted” her tweet and drove people to her blog entry. Being able to respond quickly while this is still on people’s radar is critical. Which leads to the final element …
  • A big part of the Web 2.0 mindset involves having the courage to share your work before it is fully cooked, and being willing to ask for help. Example: The Netflix competition. Embodies a lot of the Web 2.0 principles. Key point is that the company’s experts hit a wall in trying to improve their engine for recommending movies based on user preferences. They offered $1 million to anyone who could improve the algorithm. Three years later, two teams managed to double the effectiveness of the engine. All because Netflix put their work out there and asked people to help them improve it.
  • So, what have we been up to on the Web 2.0 Group? We have split our time between gathering information, sharing what we are learning and beginning to evangelize for the Web 2.0 way of working.
  • We have a long list of lessons from all of this work so far. For this presentation, we have boiled them down to three: Web 2.0 is highly relevant to our work and can make us more effective. It is not something over there that just means more work. It is not about the tools – although knowledge of them is important. It is about a different way of thinking. A different way of working. Some of the Web 2.0 principles offer a challenge to our cultural norms. Our usual way of doing business. The speed in which we work. The ways in which we listen to and interact with the field. The message we want to send out. And the amount of control we maintain over our work.
  • Which brings us to one final item - control. We had a speaker here a few weeks back who worked on the social media side of the Obama campaign. He made two key points about controlling the message in response to a question from Risa. The days are over – if they ever really existed – when we could control the conversation. But that is OK. If we want true engagement on our issues, we need to loosen the reins and let it happen. The Obama campaign got good traction from content – videos, posters, etc. - produced by passionate followers who weren’t reading from a prepared songbook. People may say things in our forums we don’t agree with. They may take a different tack than we would in their blogs. That’s OK. It is part of the process of getting to a solution. Yes, we are losing some control, but at the same time, we are gaining some. Social media help you gain control because you can manage your own publishing platforms – your Web site, your e-mails, your blogs, your publications. You have the means to get your message out the way you want to. That results in more control for us over the days when we were dependent on traditional media to get the word out. And there is growing evidence that people know to come to us for our highly credible and respected content. That’s what we’ve learned. Marjorie is going to spend some time talking about a vision for applying this to our work here at RWJF.
  • This past January, Erin Kelly from our Web team had a decision to make. Erin is an avid reader, and she was trying to decide which book to read next. There are a lot of ways she could make that decision, but she chose a path that is unique to the Web 2.0 world. Erin is an active user of Twitter, so she posed the question to her followers – her community – on Twitter.
  • So what is our vision? We’ve broken down our vision into key some concepts: concepts that we hope to embody as we become a Web 2.0 organization: We’re in the know – Matt Drudge runs the Drudge report - a conservative news website. It’s the go-to place for conservative hot-topic news and opinion on politics, entertainment, current events. They have their ears to the ground and have broken a number of stories before they’ve hit mainstream media. Like Matt Drudge, we want to know what’s going on. We want to know what’s happening in the world and how that would impact our work. We want to know what are grantees are doing and how they are triggering action. And we want to know who’s hot – who are the upcoming stars, the movers and the shakers in health, health care and policy arenas.
  • We seed and engage in the important conversations of the day. Glenn Beck is one of America&apos;s leading radio and television personalities. He connects with his fans and has created a continuous drumbeat of information and opinions on current events and politics and his views go viral once they hit the street.
  • We don’t have to have the last word on everything but do we want to be able to put ideas out there and spark conversations or reaction. Our work and thoughts are already gaining traction among people that are engaged in the conversations. And people respect us not because we&apos;re authoritative, but because our staff and our grantees add value to the conversation day in and day out.
  • We seek more feedback, more openly. Organizations like zappos.com have built their company and their brand around open feedback. It’s not just a shoe or clothing retailer, it’s a company that prides itself on customer service and engaging their customers in creating solutions. They take feedback seriously and earn street credibility by doing so. By moving towards this concept We can put our ideas out there and hear what the public has to say about it, positive of negative. And we believe that by doing so we will become a stronger, more effective organization.
  • When the iphone was introduced, Jobs showcased it on a stage to an audience of the Macworld Conference. BUT it before that moment - as early as 2002, that the buzz around the iphone began. On discussion boards and blogs, computer geeks and trendsters alike were fueling the talk. And the buzz grew and grew. In 2007 when it finally was released, people were waiting around the block to be the first to own one.
  • We’re not a retailer or a manufacturer, but we can learn from Apple. Information is spread in a more viral, targeted way. We don’t always the talking. The goal is to get the information to the right people who care about the issue. Our network can share and amplify the message, create a buzz, take action.
  • We make it easy for people to work with us. In their efforts to inform health reform, NPR has made it incredibly easy to read, upload or download stories; get facts; take a poll or link with other organizations.
  • In our own efforts, we’ve made it easier for people to download ready-to-use information, like charts and slides, to embed in their own presentations. This is different than what we typically do, we took some extra steps to make the information easy for a user to use.. We want to be able to arm people and advocates with the tools and information they need (and we don&apos;t need to know them). We want to ensure that people who want to do something about our issues can take action.
  • Our users do some of our work for us. CNN created ireport –a user-generated news site, where everyday citizens can film things they think is newsworthy, post them to the web. Users can rank them and based on the rankings and how popular a segment is on the web, CNN will share it onTV. So essentially users are serving as reporters and also editors of content.
  • We want our users to do some of our work Our users could organize our web content by creating tag clouds, which is a weighted list of words on any given website. Basically, the bigger words are those that are most frequently tagged. We want our users to organize our web content. For example, like the NYTIMES, our articles or pages can be ranked by most popular - the ones that get the most readers clicking. Or we could ask users to take a look at new ideas, review applications and vote on proposals.  
  • Web 2.0 is all about networks. You’ve heard in past PSM learning sessions how teams are tapping into our network, creating a space to engage people and fostering new connections. Our vision is that we continue to use and cultivate our networks and identify key actors, thinkers and ideas to move us forward.  
  • We want to be able to use information and feedback to help us be more effective and be better at what we do. We can measure our impact on - web traffic, downloads and sharing - which will help us better understand what products people want from us. We can use consumer engagement tactics to help us learn more about how the public perceives us. Or we can use something like this google trend. It shows us when and even where someone searched for something. Our trend shows that there were huge numbers of people search for us after the $500M Commitment to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic. So I’ve shared with you the key concepts of our vision, now I’m going to turn it to Steve to share with us how do we get there? ---------------- A – Clinton Foundation/AHA, Alliance for a Healthier Generation announcement 2006 B. - $500M Commitment to Reverse COB 2007 C. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Announces $300 Million Commitment to Dramatically Improve Quality of U.S. Health Care 2008 D. Healthy Policy Fellows Enters 35 th year 2008 E. Institute for Food Nutrition and Health To be established at Rutgers 2008 F. Center for Health Value Innovation receives prestigious award 2008
  • guidelines discussion -- how to get ongoing feedback for refinement what you can do, resources Wiki - &amp;quot;who knows how to do what&amp;quot; NPO academy and upcoming webinars listen to sources experiment! share your ideas through the blog  
  • Transcript of "Becoming a Web 2.0 Philanthropy"

    1. 1. Becoming a Web 2.0 Philanthropy October 6, 2009
    2. 2. Who we are <ul><li>Larry Blumenthal </li></ul><ul><li>Steve Downs </li></ul><ul><li>Marjorie Paloma </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Promislo </li></ul><ul><li>Marianna Sachse </li></ul><ul><li>Al Shar </li></ul><ul><li>Mimi Turi </li></ul>
    3. 3. Group charge <ul><li>As part of long-range strategic thinking: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to develop a vision for what RWJF would look like if it embraced the values of web 2.0 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to develop a set of recommendations to help us move toward this vision </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Today’s Presentation <ul><li>What we’ve done </li></ul><ul><li>What we’ve learned </li></ul><ul><li>What we envision </li></ul><ul><li>How we get there </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>
    5. 5. What is Web 2.0?
    6. 6. What is Web 2.0?
    7. 8. What is Web 2.0? <ul><li>A different way </li></ul><ul><li>of thinking </li></ul><ul><li>and acting </li></ul>
    8. 9. What is Web 2.0? Collaboration And Participation
    9. 10. What is Web 2.0? Decentralized Ownership of Information
    10. 11. What is Web 2.0? Openness and Transparency
    11. 12. What is Web 2.0? Speed and Immediacy
    12. 13. What is Web 2.0? Sharing Work in Progress
    13. 14. Our process…
    14. 15. What We’ve Learned <ul><li>Web 2.0 is: </li></ul><ul><li>Highly relevant to our work </li></ul><ul><li>Not about the tools </li></ul><ul><li>Will challenge some of our cultural norms </li></ul>
    15. 16. What About Control? You can increase impact by letting go.
    16. 17. What’s our vision?
    17. 18. Vision <ul><li>We’re in the know. </li></ul>
    18. 19. Vision <ul><li>We seed and engage in the important conversations of the day. </li></ul>
    19. 20. Vision <ul><li>We seed and engage in the important conversations of the day. </li></ul>
    20. 21. Vision <ul><li>We seek more feedback, more openly. </li></ul>
    21. 22. Our Vision <ul><li>We communicate using a network, not a broadcast model. </li></ul>
    22. 23. Our Vision <ul><li>We communicate using a network, not a broadcast model. </li></ul>
    23. 24. Our Vision <ul><li>We make it easy for people to work with us. </li></ul>…
    24. 25. Our Vision <ul><li>We make it easy for people to work with us. </li></ul>…
    25. 26. Our Vision <ul><li>Our users do some of our work for us. </li></ul>
    26. 27. Our Vision <ul><li>Our users do some of our work for us. </li></ul>
    27. 28. Our Vision We cultivate our networks. RWJF GRANTEES IN D.C.
    28. 29. Our Vision <ul><li>We adapt, based on the feedback we receive. </li></ul>
    29. 30. So … How do we get there?
    30. 31. Strategy <ul><li>Challenge: develop a strategy for RWJF to: </li></ul><ul><li>effectively harness the potential contributions of people and organizations beyond ourselves and our grantees to drive social change; and </li></ul>
    31. 32. Strategy <ul><li>Challenge: develop a strategy for RWJF to: </li></ul><ul><li>effectively harness the potential contributions of people and organizations beyond ourselves and our grantees to drive social change; and </li></ul><ul><li>use feedback to improve the quality and effectiveness of our work </li></ul>
    32. 33. <ul><li>“ Strategy is learned, not planned” </li></ul><ul><li>- Henry Mintzberg </li></ul>
    33. 34. Strategy push enable pull <ul><li>raise staff awareness and familiarity </li></ul><ul><li>ready the infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>web 2.0 for internal communications </li></ul><ul><li>bring the outside world in </li></ul><ul><li>encourage experimentation </li></ul><ul><li>establish overarching metrics for what it means to be a web 2.0 organization </li></ul>
    34. 35. Strategy enable <ul><li>raise staff awareness and familiarity </li></ul><ul><li>ready the infrastructure </li></ul>
    35. 36. Strategy push <ul><li>web 2.0 for internal communications </li></ul><ul><li>bring the outside world in </li></ul><ul><li>encourage experimentation </li></ul>
    36. 37. Internal communications
    37. 38. Internal communications
    38. 39. Ceci n’est pas un précis
    39. 40. Bring the outside world in attrition  Laura Leviton  obesity  Annual Report  directions  nursing  literacy  childhood obesity  Community Health Leaders  staff  Executive Nurse Fellows  employment  childhood obesity  obesity  Laura Leviton  literacy  obesity  staff  Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education  chronic care  nursing  frank karel  employment
    40. 41. Bring the outside world in attrition  Laura Leviton  obesity  Annual Report  directions  nursing  literacy  childhood obesity  Community Health Leaders  staff  Executive Nurse Fellows  employment  childhood obesity  obesity  Laura Leviton  literacy  obesity  staff  Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education  chronic care  nursing  frank karel  employment
    41. 42. Encourage experimentation <ul><li>Take key RWJF functions and perform them differently </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reviewing grants: crowd sourcing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Issuing publications: release them as wikis </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure they can fail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And set them up as proper experiments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hypotheses, measures, analysis, reflection </li></ul></ul></ul>
    42. 43. Strategy pull <ul><li>establish overarching metrics for what it means to be a web 2.0 organization </li></ul>
    43. 44. Reactions? <ul><li>To the vision: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is it appealing? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is it bold enough? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>To the strategy: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Does it make sense? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What else will it take? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>How does it make you feel?? </li></ul>
    44. 45. What you can do <ul><li>Start listening to sources (RSS, Twitter) </li></ul><ul><li>Get help & training: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>go to the wiki - &quot;who knows how to do what“ – ask someone to help you out </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>NPO academy and upcoming webinars </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Get your feet wet </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use the guidelines </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Share your reactions and ideas through the Web 2.0 blog   </li></ul>
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