Excellence Through Values
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Excellence Through Values

  • 2,167 views
Uploaded on

Presentation by Vignana Bharathi on Engineers Day 2009.

Presentation by Vignana Bharathi on Engineers Day 2009.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • nice
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,167
On Slideshare
2,167
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
75
Comments
1
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Aahaar Nidra Bhay Maithunan cha Subhaashitaa. Tolerance, Universal acceptance, Infosys : Powered by intellect and driven by values Tata Code of Conduct Clause 1 National interest and 17 Ethical conduc t Vision Statement of Dr Vikram Sarabhai ‘… application of advanced technologies to the real problems of man and society ’
  • The pillars of Ashoka are a series of columns dispersed throughout the northern Indian subcontinent, and erected by the Mauryan king Ashoka during his reign in the 3rd century BCE . Originally, there must have been many pillars of Ashoka although only ten with inscriptions still survive. Averaging between forty and fifty feet in height, and weighing up to fifty tons each, all the pillars were quarried at Chunar, just south of Varanasi and dragged, sometimes hundreds of miles, to where they were erected. [1] Contents [hide] [ edit ] Overview The Asokan pillar at Lumbini The columns that bear the edicts of Ashoka include the two pillars at Delhi (originally located at Meerut and Topra in Haryana and were brought to Delhi during the reign of Firuz Shah Tughluq in 1356), the pillar at Allahabad (is believed as originally located at Kaushambi ) and the pillars found at Lauriya- Areraj , Lauriya-Nandangarh, Rampurva (with lion capital), Sankissa , Sanchi and Sarnath . The columns bearing dedicatory inscriptions were found in Lumbini and Nigalisagar . The pillars found at Vaishali (with single lion capital) and Rampurva (with bull capital) do not bear any edict. [2] These pillars were carved in two types of stone. Some were of the spotted red and white sandstone from the region of Mathura, the others of buff-colored fine grained hard sandstone usually with small black spots quarried in the Chunar near Varanasi . The uniformity of style in the pillar capitals suggests that they were all sculpted by craftsmen from the same region. It would therefore seem that stone was transported from Mathura and Chunar to the various sites where the pillars have been found, and there was cut and carved by craftsmen [3] The pillars have four component parts. The shafts are always plain and smooth, circular in cross-section, slightly tapering upwards and always chiselled out of a single piece of stone. The capitals have the shape and appearance of a gently arched bell formed of lotus petals. The abaci are of two types: square and plain and circular and decorated and these are of different proportions. The crowning animals are either seated or standing, always in the round and chiseled as a single piece with the abaci. [2] [ edit ] Description of the pillars The most celebrated pillar is the pillar with the lion capital at Sarnath. Here, four lions are seated back to back. The pillar at Sanchi also has a similar lion capital. There are two pillars at Rampurva, one with bull and the other with lion as crowning animal. The pillar at Sankissa has an elephant as crowning animal. Five of the pillars of Ashoka (two at Rampurva, one each at Vaishali, Lauriya-Areraj and Lauryia-Nandangarh were possibly marked the course of the ancient Royal highway from Patliputra to the Nepal valley. [ edit ] Pillar at Vaishali Front view of the single lion capital in Vaishali . There exists in Vaishali , a pillar with a single lion capital erected by Ashoka. The location of this pillar is contiguous to the site where a Buddhist monastery and a sacred coronation tank stood. Excavations are still underway and several stupas suggesting a far flung campus for the monastery have been discovered. This pillar is different from the earlier Ashokan pillars because it has only one lion capital. The lion faces north, the direction Buddha took on his last voyage. [4] Identification of the site for excavation in 1969 was aided by the fact that this pillar still jutted out of the soil. More such pillars exist in this greater area but they are all devoid of the capital. [ edit ] Pillars at Lauriya-Areraj and Lauriya-Nandangarh The column at Lauriya-Nandangarh , 23 km from Bettiah in West Champaran district , Bihar has a single lion capital. The hump and the hind legs of the lion project beyond the abacus. [2] The pillar at Lauriya-Areraj in East Champaran district , Bihar is presently devoid of any capital. [ edit ] Erecting the Pillars The Pillars of Ashoka may have been erected using the same methods that were used to erect the ancient obelisks . Roger Hopkins and Mark Lehrner conducted several obelisk erecting experiments including a successful attempt to erect a 25 ton obelisk in 1999. This followed two experiments to erect smaller obelisks and two failed attempts to erect a 25 ton obelisk. [5] [6] [ edit ] Languages Alexander Cunningham , one of the first to study the pillars, remarks that they are written in eastern, middle and western prakrits which he calls "the Punjabi or north-western dialect, the Ujjeni or middle dialect, and the M&gadhi or eastern dialect." [7] They are written in the Brahmi script . [ edit ] History of discovery The first Pillar of Ashoka was found in the 16 century by Thomas Coryat in the ruins of ancient Delhi. Initially he assumed that from the way it glowed that it was made of brass, but on closer examination he realized it was made of highly polished sandstone with upright script that resembled a form of Greek. In the 1830s James Prinsep began to decipher them with the help of Captain Edward Smith and George Turnour. They determined that the script referred to King Piyadasi which was also the epithet of an Indian ruler known as Ashoka who came to the throne 218 years after Buddha's enlightenment. Scholars have since found 150 of Ashoka's inscriptions, carved into the face of rocks or on stone pillars marking out a domain that stretched across northern India and south below the central plateau of the Deccan. These pillars were placed in strategic sites near border cities and trade routes. [ edit ] Background of construction Ashoka ascended to the throne in 269 BCE inheriting the empire founded by his grandfather Chandragupta Maurya. Ashoka was reputedly a tyrant at the outset of his reign. Eight years after his accession he campaigned in Kalinga where in his own words, "a hundred and fifty thousand people were deported, a hundred thousand were killed and as many as that perished..." After this event Ashoka converted to Buddhism in remorse for the loss of life. Buddhism didn't become a state religion but with Ashoka's support it spread rapidly. The inscriptions on the pillars described edicts about morality based on Buddhist tenets. Legend has it that Ashoka built 84,000 Stupas commemorating the events and relics of Buddha's life. Some of these Stupas contained networks of walls containing the hub spokes and rim of a wheel, while others contained interior walls in a swastika shape. The wheel represents the sun, time, and Buddhist law (the wheel of law, or dharmachakra), while the swastika stands for the cosmic dance around a fixed center and guards against evil. [8] [9]
  • Parāśara is a Rigveda Mahārśi and author of many ancient Indian texts. Parāśara was the grandson of Vasishtha , the son of Shakti-muni, and the father of Vyasa . There are several texts which give reference to Parāśara as the author/speaker. Modern scholars believe that there were many individuals who used this name throughout time. Hindus believe that the same Parāśara taught these various texts and the time of writing them varied. The actual sage himself never wrote the texts, he was known as a traveling teacher, and the various texts attributed to him are given in reference to Parāśara being the speaker to his student It has been claimed that Kashyapa, later known as Kanada ( Sanskrit : कणाद ; also transliterated as Canada as well as other forms) was a Hindu sage and philosopher who founded the philosophical school of Vaisheshika . [1] He talked of Dvyanuka (biatomic molecule ) and tryanuka (triatomic molecule ). He probably lived around the 2nd century BCE, [2] while other sources claim he lived in the 6th Century BC. [3] [4] It is believed that he was born in Prabhas Kshetra (near Dwaraka ) in Gujarat , India . His primary area of study was Rasavādam , considered to be a type of alchemy . He is said to have believed that all living beings are composed of five elements: water, fire, earth, air, ether. Vegetables have only water, insects have water and fire, birds have water, fire, earth and air, and Humans, the top of the creation, have ether - the sense of discrimination (time, space, mind) are one. He theorized that Gurutva was responsible for the falling of objects on the Earth. Many believe that Kanada originated the concept of atom . An interesting story states that this theory occurred to him while he was walking with food in his hand. As he nibbled at the food in his hand, throwing away the small particles, it occurred to him that he could not divide the food into further parts and thus the idea of a matter which cannot be divided further came into existence. He called that indivisible matter as ' Anu ' .i.e. atom. Bharadwaja ( भरद्वाज / भारद्वाज ) was one of the greatest Hindu sages ( Maharshis ) descendant of rishi Angirasa, whose accomplishments are detailed in the Puranas . Bharadwaja rishi was father of Dronacharya and grand father of Ashwatthama . Bharadwaja Maharshi, a sage of the Vedic period, is renowned for his thirst for knowledge. He attained extraordinary scholarship and the power of meditation. He was one of the Saptarshis (Seven Great Sages Rishi ) in the present Manvantara ; with others being Atri , Vashishtha , Vishvamitra , Gautama , Jamadagni , Kashyapa Agastya ( अगस्त्य in devanagari , pronounced /ə gus tyə/) or Agathiyar( அகதியர் in Tamil ) was a Vedic sage or rishi . Agastya and his clan are also credited [ who? ] to have "authored" many mantras of the Rig Veda , the earliest and most revered Hindu scripture, in the sense of first having the mantras revealed in his mind by the Supreme Brahman . Agastya is also the author of Agastya Samhita[ref: Dharma Bharathi]. In some reckonings, Agastya is the greatest of the Seven Sages or Saptarshis . The word is also written as Agasti . A-ga means a mountain, Asti, thrower. Also a name of Lord Shiva . Agastya the Rishi, was born of both Gods, Mitra and Varuna , from Urvashi. Agastya is also the Indian astronomical name of the star of Canopus , is said to be the 'cleanser of waters', since its rising coincides with the calming of the waters of the Indian Ocean . Another reference is in the Mahabharata in Sauptikaparva as the teacher of Guru Drona , who gave Drona, the greatest of weapons, Brahmastra (used by both Arjuna and Ashwatthama at the end of the war). Agastya ( अगस्त्य in devanagari , pronounced /ə gus tyə/) or Agathiyar( அகதியர் in Tamil ) was a Vedic sage or rishi . Agastya and his clan are also credited [ who? ] to have "authored" many mantras of the Rig Veda , the earliest and most revered Hindu scripture, in the sense of first having the mantras revealed in his mind by the Supreme Brahman . Agastya is also the author of Agastya Samhita[ref: Dharma Bharathi]. In some reckonings, Agastya is the greatest of the Seven Sages or Saptarshis . The word is also written as Agasti . A-ga means a mountain, Asti, thrower. Also a name of Lord Shiva . Agastya the Rishi, was born of both Gods, Mitra and Varuna , from Urvashi. Agastya is also the Indian astronomical name of the star of Canopus , is said to be the 'cleanser of waters', since its rising coincides with the calming of the waters of the Indian Ocean . Another reference is in the Mahabharata in Sauptikaparva as the teacher of Guru Drona , who gave Drona, the greatest of weapons, Brahmastra (used by both Arjuna and Ashwatthama at the end of the war). Daivajna Varāhamihira ( Devanagari : वराहमिहिर ; 505 – 587), also called Varaha, or Mihira was an Indian astronomer , mathematician , and astrologer who lived in Ujjain . He is considered to be one of the nine jewels ( Navaratnas ) of the court of legendary king Vikramaditya (thought to be the Gupta emperor Chandragupta II Vikramaditya ). Though little is known about his life, he supposedly hailed from South Bengal , where in the ruins of Chandraketugarh there is a mound called the mound of Khana and Mihir. Khana was the daughter-in-law of Varaha and a famous astrologer herself. Modern Shakadvipi brahmins, esp astrologers, regard Varah Mihir as their ancestor, although there is no ancient documentary proof in favour of this belief.
  • Parāśara is a Rigveda Mahārśi and author of many ancient Indian texts. Parāśara was the grandson of Vasishtha , the son of Shakti-muni, and the father of Vyasa . There are several texts which give reference to Parāśara as the author/speaker. Modern scholars believe that there were many individuals who used this name throughout time. Hindus believe that the same Parāśara taught these various texts and the time of writing them varied. The actual sage himself never wrote the texts, he was known as a traveling teacher, and the various texts attributed to him are given in reference to Parāśara being the speaker to his student
  • Education : B.A. from Madras University in 1881 civil engineering at the College of Science, Pune (College of Engineering, Pune) Job : First job with the Public Works Department (PWD) of Bombay Then tookup a job in Irrigation dept He implemented an extremely intricate system of irrigation in the Deccan area designed and patented a system of automatic weir water floodgates flood protection system to protect the city of Hyderabad from floods system to protect Visakhapatnam port from sea erosion also instrumental in charting out the plan for road construction between Thirumala and Tirupati As Dewan of Mysore State KRS dam , first electricity generation plant in Asia , Mysore Soap factory, Parasitoide laboratory, Bhadravati Steel factory, Sri Jayachamarajendra Polytechnic Institute (SJP) Polytechnic Institute, the Bangalore Agricultural University, the State Bank of Mysore, the Mysore sugar mills and many more As Visionary As far back as 1934, Visveswarayya published his Planned Economy for India and thus laid the foundation of India's five-year Plans which began in 1952. Awards isvesvaraya was made  Knight Commander  of the  Order of the Indian Empire  by the British for his myriad contributions to the public good After  India  attained independence, Sir M. Visvesvaraya was given the nation's highest honour, the  Bharat Ratna , in 1955. honorary membership of the international  Institution of Civil Engineers  (based in  London ) and a fellowship of the  Indian Institute of Science  (based in Bangalore ). He was president of the 1923 Session of the  Indian Science Congress. .
  • 1.Took up research in 1894 and took an oath to devote his entire life to scientific research. Experiment of waves travelling through solid walls in 1894 and 1895 2.“In May 1901, Bose wrote to his friend Rabindranath Tagore: "...the proprietor of a reputed telegraph company...came himself with a Patent form in hand...He proposed to take half of the profit and finance the business in the bargain. This multi-millionaire came to me abegging. My friend, I wish you could see that terrible attachment for gain in this country, that all engaging lucre, that lust for money and more money. Once caught in that trap there would have been no way out for me." 3.Discriminated at Presidency college as he was paid only half of two thirds of actual salary. Refused to receive that salary and worked without pay for three years, after which Govt paid him in full with retrospective effect. Repaid his father’s debts inspite of settlement.
  • Within the first 12 years of his proposal of raman effect, more than 1800 research papers were presented throughout the world. ‘ Handbuckder Physik’ was a German Journal, which entertained only German scientists to contribute to it His research included Optics, Sound Raman Effect Sometimes a rainbow appears and delights our eyes. We see in it shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. The white ray of the sun includes all these colors. When a beam of sunlight is passed through a glass prism a patch of these *color- bands are seen. This is called the spectrum. The Spectro- meter is an apparatus used to study the spectrum. Spectral lines in it are characteristic of the light passing through the prism. A beam of light that causes a single spectral line is said to be monochromatic. When a beam of monochromatic light passes through a transparent substance (a substance which allows light to pass through it), the beam is scattered. Raman spent a long time in the study of the scattered light.. On February 28, 1928, he observed two low intensity spectral line corresponding to the incident mono- chromatic light. Years of his labor had borne fruit. It was clear that though the incident light was monochromatic, the scattered light due to it, was not monochromatic.Thus Raman's experiments discovered a phenomenon which was lying hidden in nature. The 16th of March 1928 is a memorable day in the history )f science. On that day a meeting was held under the joint auspices of the South Indian Science Association and the Science Club of Central College, Bangalore; Raman was the Chief Guest. He announced the new phenomenon discovered by him to the world. He also acknowledged wit h affection the assistance given by K.S. Krishnan and Venkateshwaran, who were his students.
  • In 1936, Bhabha collaborated with Walter Heitler to formulate a theory on cosmic ray showers. They conjectured that the showers were formed by the cascade production of gamma rays and positive and negative electron pairs. In this process, high energy electrons passing through matter would turn into high energy photons by means of the bremsstrahlung process. The photons then produced a positive and negative electron pair, which then led to additional production of photons. This process continued until the energy of the particles went below a critical value. [8] In 1936, the two published a paper, "The Passage of Fast Electrons and the Theory of Cosmic Showers" in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, Series A , in which they used their theory to describe how primary cosmic rays from outer space interact with the upper atmosphere to produce particles observed at the ground level. Bhabha and Heitler then made numerical estimates of the number of electrons in the cascade process at different altitudes for different electron initiation energies. The calculations agreed with the experimental observations of cosmic ray showers made by Bruno Rossi and Pierre Victor Auger a few years before. [8] Bhabha later concluded that observations of the properties of such particles would lead to the straightforward experimental verification of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity. In 1937, Bhabha was awarded the Senior Studentship of the 1851 Exhibition, which helped him continue his work at Cambridge until the outbreak of World War II in 1939. [7] In 1939, Bhabha went back to India for a brief holiday. In September, World War II broke out, and Bhabha decided not to return to England for the time being. [10] He accepted an offer to serve as the Reader in the Physics Department of the Indian Institute of Science , then headed by renowned physicist C. V. Raman . He received a special research grant from the Sir Dorab Tata Trust, which he used to establish the Cosmic Ray Research Unit at the institute. [11] Bhabha selected a few students, including Harish-Chandra , who would later serve as the IBM von Neumann Professor in the School of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study , to work with him. [10] He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on 20 March 1941 . With the help of J. R. D. Tata , he established the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Bombay. With the end of the World War II and Indian Independence , he received a commendation from Jawaharlal Nehru for his efforts towards peaceful development of atomic energy. He established the Atomic Energy Commission of India in 1948. Homi J. Bhabha was also a close friend of Jawaharlal Nehru and he, along with Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru , had played a significant role for developing the Indian nuclear program as well as education reforms in India . He represented India in International Atomic Energy Forums, and as President of the United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, in Geneva , Switzerland in 1955.
  • 1 -- Rejected lucrative offers from British instituions to serve the country. 2 -- 'When nuclear energy has been success- fully applied to power production in, say, a couple of decades from now, India will not have to look abroad for its experts, but will find them ready at hand.' Bhabha wrote this letter almost a year before the atom bombs fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki! India got independence on August 15, 1947. Eleven days later, on August 26, 1947, Bhabha addressed the Atomic Energy Research Committee as follows: "We meet today at the beginning of a new chapter in our history. We have great hopes that this new chapter will be a glorious one. The development and use of atomic energy is a question of national importance. We hope to establish soon an Atomic Research Center comparable with those in the most advanced countries." 3. Caused a reverse brain drain. Gave a call to the scientists in other countries and convinced them to serve the motherland.. Provided the required facilities to carry n the research work for those who returned. Dr AS Rao, Vikram Sarabhai etc.
  • Scientist – Family – Exhibition Meeting with one lakh kids to secure the future of the country in the area of science and technology,
  • In 1963, a huge  tidal wave  washed away parts of  Pamban Bridge  that connected  Rameshwaram  to mainland  Tamil Nadu . The Railways set a target of six months for the bridge to be repaired while Sreedharan's boss, under whose jurisdiction the bridge came, reduced it to three months. Sreedharan was put in-charge of the execution and he restored the bridge in just 46 days.  [1]  The  Railway minister's Award  was given to him in recognition of this achievement.
  • Sreedharan resigned as the managing director DMRC, taking  moral responsibility  for the collapse of an under-construction bridge  Not even a single corruption charge Mr Sreedharan wakes before  dawn , meditates, reads the  Bhagavad Gita  and does  yoga  every morning.  "Why do you want to write about me?". "Write about the project.“ Almost all his take home salary of 30,000 goes to charity and he lives on his pension.

Transcript

  • 1. Vignana Bharathi, Hyderabad
  • 2.
    • Significance of Today – Sep 15
    • Core Theme - Excellence thru Values
    • Past Legends
    • Sir MV – Achievements
    • Sir MV - Life
    • Sir MV – Life Values
    • More Recent Legends
    • Take away
  • 3.
    • A memorable day in the annals of the engineering fraternity
    • Birthday of Sir Mokshagundam Visvesvarayya
    • Renowned Indian Engineer and Statesman
    • Honoured by the country’s highest civilian award, the Bharat Ratna, in the year 1955
    • Provides good opportunity for us engineers to focus on relevant topic of national importance
  • 4.
    • Important theme for this year.
    • ex·cel·lence
    • - The state, quality, or condition of excelling
    • - The quality of being eminently good
    • val.ues (moral, ethical)
      • - a set of moral principles of conduct or guiding philosophy governing an individual or a group
    • Excellence through Values
      • - Reaching and performing at the excelling state through (leveraging, not compromising on) moral principles of conduct for the overall good of our culture, nation and entire human race on the whole.
  • 5.
    • Key to Success
      • Top Leaders, Nations, Companies achieved their positions through excellence in respective areas
    • Need of the present
      • Mediocrity not acceptable
      • Fast changing world with intense competition
      • Mistakes (process/quality) can be fatal
    • Realize dream for future
      • Both for self and nation
  • 6.
    • The Art we have mastered
    • Real differentiator among the great ones
    • Life fulfilling experience
    • Message of the great –
      • “ We want that education by which character is formed, strength of mind is increased, the intellect is expanded, and by which one can stand on one's own feet.”
        • – Swami Vivekananda
    • Hire/Fire differentiator for Corporates
      • Enforced through Vision Statements, Compliance trainings, Policy Documents and so on.
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • “ Today, the western scientific progress has physically united the world. It has not only got rid of the ‘space’ factor, it has also equipped the various countries of the world with deadly arms. But they have not yet learnt the art of knowing and loving one another. If we want to save humanity at this most critical juncture, the only option is the Indian approach.”
    • - Dr. Arnold Joseph Toynbee (1889-1975), British Historian
  • 9.
    • (I want to see) "Some blood transfusion from the East to the West, to save Western science from spiritual anaemia."
      • - Erwin Schroedinger (1887--1961) Austrian theoretical physicist, the Nobel prize winner for Quantum Mechanics in 1933.
  • 10.
    • "So far as I am able to judge, nothing has been left undone, either by man or nature, to make India the most extraordinary country that the sun visits on his rounds. Nothing seems to have been forgotten, nothing overlooked."
    • - Mark Twain (1835-1910)
  • 11.
    • Pushpak Vimana (Ramayana)
    • Yantra driven boat & continuous circulating fish (Mahabharata)
    • Harappan Civilization (3500 BCE?)
    • Ashoka Pillar (3 rd century BCE)
    • Perpetual Motion Machine (Aryabhatta, 5 th Century)
    • Khajurao Temples (9 th century)
    • Gola-adhyaya and Graha Ganita (Bhaskar, 12 th century)
    • Military powered rockets of Tipu Sultan (18 th Century)
  • 12. Parashara Kanada Bharadwaja Agastya Charaka Sushruta Varahimihira Earlier Legends…
  • 13.  
  • 14. JC Bose Homi J Bhabha Vikram Sarabhai Sir CV Raman The legacy continues… APJ Abdul Kalam E Sreedharan Narayan Murthy
  • 15. A living sample of excellence
  • 16.
    • One of the many living contributions of Sir M visvesvarayya
    • Unique example of hi-tech engineering and excellence
    • Built in 1932 on Kaveri River
    • In Mandya Disc, near Mysore, Karnataka
    • At the time of Krishnaraja Wodeyar IV
    • Height – 125 feet, Length 8600
    • Capacity – 49 billion cubic feet
    • The first dam in the world to use automatic sluice gates
    • Has attached terrace garden popularly known as Brindavan Garden
    • Legacy of Sir MV
  • 17.
    • KRS Dam
    • Brindavan Garden
    • Bhadravati Steel Plant
    • Bank of Mysore
    • Irrigation system in the Deccan area
    • Automatic weir water floodgates (near Pune)
    • Flood protection system for Hyderabad
    • Prevent erosion at Visakhapatnam port
    • Plan for road construction between Thirumala and Tirupati
    • First electricity generation plant in Asia
    • Mysore Soap factory
    • Parasitoide laboratory
    • Sri Jayachamarajendra Polytechnic Institute
    • The Bangalore Agricultural University
    • The State Bank of Mysore
    • The Mysore sugar mills
  • 18.
    • Born on 15 Sep 1861 (Muddenahalli, Chikballapur, Kingdom of Mysore)
    • B.A. (Madras University), Civil engineering (CoE, Pune)
    • Key Jobs
      • PWD Bombay
      • Indian Irrigation Commission
      • Dewan of Mysore State
    • Honours
      • Bharat Ratna (1955)
      • Knight Commander of Order of Indian Empire
      • Honorary membership of International Institution of Civil Engineers
      • Fellowship of Indian Institute of Science
      • Popularly known as “Father of modern Mysore State”
    • Last Breath on 14 April 1962
  • 19.
    • Living the idea
    • Sincerity
      • Deewan of Mysore state offer
      • Last day of service
    • Time management
    • Dedication to the cause
      • Leading delegation to US
      • SJP Institute
    • Long term vision
      • Krishna Raja Sagar Dam and Brindavan Gardens
      • Consulting relatives over taking up the job of diwan only under the assurance that no relative would seek any favour.
    • Multifaceted
  • 20.  
  • 21.
    • Established life in plants
    • Accredited with the invention of wireless before Marconi
    • First ever Indian to get a patent
    • Inventor of Crescograph
    • Experiments involving Coherer used by the Navy for communication.
    • Honors
      • Companion of the Order of the Indian Empire (CIE) (1903)
      • Companion of the Order of the Star of India (CSI) (1912)
      • Knighthood, 1917
      • Fellow of the Royal Society (1920)
      • Member of the Vienna Academy of Science, 1928
      • President of the 14th session of the Indian Science Congress in 1927.
  • 22.
    • Took up research and devoted his entire life to scientific research.
    • Opposed Patents
    • Upheld self esteem by opposing discrimination at Presidency College
    • If anybody ever intends to dedicate himself to a great mission, let him not expect a fruitful end. If his patience be infinite then alone he will come to understand that a day will come when his perseverance, inspite of repeated failures will bring him success….
  • 23.
    • First Asian to be awarded Noble prize in Physics.
    • Proposed the breakthrough theory ‘Raman effect’
    • Co-proposer of Raman-Nath theory along with Nagendra Nath
    • Only non-German whose paper was published in ‘Handbuckder Physik’
    • A field of study, Raman Spectrography, Has been named after him
    • Honors
      • Knight Bachelor (1929)
      • Nobel Prize in Physics (1930)
      • Bharat Ratna
      • Lenin Peace Prize
  • 24.
    • Sacrificed his high salary Govt job for carrying out research
    • Given due credit to his students who helped him in his breakthrough discovery Raman effect.
    • Presented Raman effect at swedish Academy using Alcohol and avoided the same in the evening party.
    • Abruptly left a high profile meeting in the middle, to search for future scientists in school children.
    • Laid emphasis on “Swadeshi”
  • 25.
    • Father of Indian Nuclear Program
    • Bhabha presented, with Heitler, the 'Cascade Theory of Electron Showers', in 1937.
    • Electron-positron scattering was later named ’Bhabha scattering’
    • Bhabha recognized heavy electron particles in cosmic rays and called them 'Meson'.
    • He played pivotal role in establishing the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research(1945) in Bombay, and the Atomic Energy Commission of India three years later.
    • Three Atomic Reactors ('Apsara', 'Cirus' and 'Zerlina‘) are the Results of his efforts.
  • 26.
    • Country First
      • Stayed back during WW2
      • Rejected British institution offers
    • Visionary
      • Nuclear energy for power production
    • Talent for the country
      • Reversed brain drain
    • Self Reliance
      • In Nuclear Energy
  • 27.
    • Missile man Of India
    • Pioneer work on development of ballistic missile and space rocket technology
    • Inspired young to see India a developed country by 2020
    • Pivotal organisational, technical and political role in India's Pokhran-II nuclear test in 1998
    • Heavily involved in the development of India's first indigenous Satellite Launch Vehicle (SLV-III)
    • Honors
      • First Asian to be bestowed the Hoover Medal, America's top engineering prize (2009)
      • Doctorate from 30+ universities
      • Padma Bhushan in 1981
      • Padma Vibhushan in 1990
      • Bharat Ratna in 1997
  • 28.
    • Visionary
      • Vision 2020
    • Innovation and Application
      • callipers for the polio affected
    • Simple living high thinking
    • Empathy
      • Exhibition
    • Humble
      • People’s President
  • 29.
    • Managing Director Delhi Metro project
      • On or before schedule, within budget
    • Successful on-time progress/completion of the Konkan Railway 
      • 760 kms line, 150 briedges, 93 tunnels in 82 kms
    • Restored Pamban Bridge in 46 days against 3 months available
    • Member of the advisory board foundation for the Restoration of National Values
    Delhi Metro Chief
  • 30.
    • High moral standards
      • Resignation on bridge collapse
    • Unquestioned Honesty & Integrity
    • Disciplined Lifestyle
      • Daily routine maintained
    • Selfless / Focus on work
      • Message to media
    • Philanthropic
  • 31.  
  • 32.
    • I was raised in Tamilnadu in South India, in the ashram of Sri Ramana Maharishi, of an English father and a Polish mother. Both were dedicated followers of Sri Ramana Maharishi. Therefore as a child growing up in the small town of Tiruvannamalai, Tamilnadu, I was fluent in Tamil and was surrounded by Indians who were proud of their nationality and heritage, and believed they had a lot to teach us Europeans. I still speak enough Tamil to get by, and feel that my roots are indeed in India. I must be only professed "vellakaaren" (=white) Tamilian in America.
    • After all, how could anyone, even an English boy, grow up in Tiruvannamalai, in the ashram of Sri Ramana Maharishi, and not acquire a pride in his roots?
    • It is therefore with some misgivings that today I find myself dealing with Indians, many of who do not feel proud of their Indianness. Indian Americans represent the most affluent minority in America, ahead of Jewish Americans and Japanese Americans. This is a statistic and not an opinion.
    • Indians are recognized throughout America as technically superior.
    • Since the day Indians learn pride, India will rapidly move out of its third world status to become one of the world’s inductrial powers.
  • 33.
    • Just matching my preference with the groups choice 
    • Nation First
      • With harmony of personal goals with national interest
    • Honesty and Integrity
    • Discipline
    • Let us come up with top 3 as a group…
  • 34. “ Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life – think of it, dream of it, live on idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.  ”  - Swami Vivekananda
  • 35.