Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Fantastique
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Fantastique

1,734

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,734
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Hector Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique 5th Movement – Songe d’une nuit du sabbat
  • 2. EXPLORE
  • 3. EXPLORE French composer Hector Berlioz (1803 – 1869) wrote Symphonie Fantastique in 1830
  • 4. EXPLORE French composer Hector Berlioz (1803 – 1869) wrote Symphonie Fantastique in 1830 It is a symphony in five movements each with their own descriptive title
  • 5. EXPLORE French composer Hector Berlioz (1803 – 1869) wrote Symphonie Fantastique in 1830 It is a symphony in five movements each with their own descriptive title It is a perfect example of Programme Music and Berlioz even wrote his own Programme Notes to accompany the music
  • 6. EXPLORE French composer Hector Berlioz (1803 – 1869) wrote Symphonie Fantastique in 1830 It is a symphony in five movements each with their own descriptive title It is a perfect example of Programme Music and Berlioz even wrote his own Programme Notes to accompany the music Symphonie Fantastique is also called ‘An episode in the life of an Artist’ and Berlioz wrote the work after falling desperately in love with the actress, Harriet Smithson
  • 7. EXPLORE French composer Hector Berlioz (1803 – 1869) wrote Symphonie Fantastique in 1830 It is a symphony in five movements each with their own descriptive title It is a perfect example of Programme Music and Berlioz even wrote his own Programme Notes to accompany the music Symphonie Fantastique is also called ‘An episode in the life of an Artist’ and Berlioz wrote the work after falling desperately in love with the actress, Harriet Smithson His love was unrequited at first which nearly sent him mad but he persevered and they eventually married a few years later
  • 8. EXPLORE In the story, the ‘Artist’ (i.e. Berlioz), has taken opium and goes on a journey of five drug induced fantasies
  • 9. EXPLORE In the story, the ‘Artist’ (i.e. Berlioz), has taken opium and goes on a journey of five drug induced fantasies Berlioz uses one melodic theme throughout the entire work to represent the Artist’s love interest (Harriet Smithson)
  • 10. EXPLORE In the story, the ‘Artist’ (i.e. Berlioz), has taken opium and goes on a journey of five drug induced fantasies Berlioz uses one melodic theme throughout the entire work to represent the Artist’s love interest (Harriet Smithson) The theme is transformed in each movement to represent the character of that particular dream – this is called an ‘idée fixe’ which literally means ‘fixed idea’
  • 11. EXPLORE In the story, the ‘Artist’ (i.e. Berlioz), has taken opium and goes on a journey of five drug induced fantasies Berlioz uses one melodic theme throughout the entire work to represent the Artist’s love interest (Harriet Smithson) The theme is transformed in each movement to represent the character of that particular dream – this is called an ‘idée fixe’ which literally means ‘fixed idea’ The 5th movement is called Songe d’une nuit du sabbat or Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath and Berlioz creates a nightmarish version of his own funeral, complete with all sorts of ghouls and ghosts
  • 12. EXPLORE This is what Berlioz’ own notes say:
  • 13. EXPLORE This is what Berlioz’ own notes say: He sees himself at a witches’ sabbath, in the midst of a hideous gathering of shades, sorcerers and monsters of every kind who have come together for his funeral. Strange sounds, groans, outbursts of laughter; distant shouts which seem to be answered by more shouts. The beloved melody appears once more, but has now lost its noble and shy character; it is now no more than a vulgar dance tune, trivial and grotesque: it is she who is coming to the sabbath… Roar of delight at her arrival… She joins the diabolical orgy… The funeral knell tolls, burlesque parody of the Dies irae, the dance of the witches. The dance of the witches combined with the Dies irae.
  • 14. EXPERIENCE
  • 15. EXPERIENCE Listen to the 5th movement of Symphonie Fantastique – now that you know a bit of the background try and conjure up some images that the music might be portraying
  • 16. EXPERIENCE Listen to the 5th movement of Symphonie Fantastique – now that you know a bit of the background try and conjure up some images that the music might be portraying Now let’s take a closer look at the idée fixe to see how Berlioz transforms his theme:
  • 17. Here is the original theme as first seen in the opening of the first movement. As Berlioz himself said, it is of noble and shy character: Click here to listen: This is played by solo flute and the first violin section and the notes are very legato, creating a feeling of calm
  • 18. And here is the theme from the 5th movement, now a ‘vulgar dance tune, trivial and grotesque’: Click here to listen: This time, the melody is played on the Eb Clarinet but right up until bar 19 the notes are exactly the same as the original
  • 19. Let’s take a closer look at the first phrase of each of the two themes:
  • 20. Let’s take a closer look at the first phrase of each of the two themes: If we connect each note you will see that the pitches Berlioz uses are identical:
  • 21. Let’s take a closer look at the first phrase of each of the two themes: If we connect each note you will see that the pitches Berlioz uses are identical:
  • 22. Let’s take a closer look at the first phrase of each of the two themes: If we connect each note you will see that the pitches Berlioz uses are identical: In the second version of the theme, Berlioz has changed the time signature, made the note lengths shorter and added acciaccaturas and trills
  • 23. EXPERIENCE Watch the short film where Duncan Swindells, Principal Bass Clarinet in the RSNO, talks about the clarinet section, and how Berlioz uses the instrument to create different characters and moods in this piece
  • 24. RESPOND
  • 25. RESPOND What period of music is this piece from ?
  • 26. RESPOND What period of music is this piece from ? The 5th movement can easily be divided up into three sections: the opening section with the idée fixe theme, the Dies Irae which literally means Day of Wrath and the Ronde du Sabbat or Round Dance
  • 27. RESPOND What period of music is this piece from ? The 5th movement can easily be divided up into three sections: the opening section with the idée fixe theme, the Dies Irae which literally means Day of Wrath and the Ronde du Sabbat or Round Dance Click here to listen to the opening of the Dies Irae:
  • 28. RESPOND What period of music is this piece from ? The 5th movement can easily be divided up into three sections: the opening section with the idée fixe theme, the Dies Irae which literally means Day of Wrath and the Ronde du Sabbat or Round Dance Click here to listen to the opening of the Dies Irae: The theme, introduced by the bassoons, is made up of continuous dotted minims. The horns and trombones then repeat the theme but it has been altered. How has it changed?
  • 29. RESPOND What period of music is this piece from ? The 5th movement can easily be divided up into three sections: the opening section with the idée fixe theme, the Dies Irae which literally means Day of Wrath and the Ronde du Sabbat or Round Dance Click here to listen to the opening of the Dies Irae: The theme, introduced by the bassoons, is made up of continuous dotted minims. The horns and trombones then repeat the theme but it has been altered. How has it changed? The notes are the same but something has happened to the rhythm. What is the musical term for this?
  • 30. RESPOND The Round Dance takes its name from the musical form that it is written in. In music, what is a round? Can you think of another name for a more complicated and involved round?
  • 31. RESPOND The Round Dance takes its name from the musical form that it is written in. In music, what is a round? Can you think of another name for a more complicated and involved round? Click here to listen to the end of the fugue:
  • 32. RESPOND The Round Dance takes its name from the musical form that it is written in. In music, what is a round? Can you think of another name for a more complicated and involved round? Click here to listen to the end of the fugue: What is happening here? What two themes have been combined?
  • 33. RESPOND The Round Dance takes its name from the musical form that it is written in. In music, what is a round? Can you think of another name for a more complicated and involved round? Click here to listen to the end of the fugue: What is happening here? What two themes have been combined? What instrument does Berlioz use that makes it really obvious that this music is about a funeral?
  • 34. RESPOND The Round Dance takes its name from the musical form that it is written in. In music, what is a round? Can you think of another name for a more complicated and involved round? Click here to listen to the end of the fugue: What is happening here? What two themes have been combined? What instrument does Berlioz use that makes it really obvious that this music is about a funeral? Create your own 8 bar ‘idée fixe’ keeping the notes and rhythm very simple. Now, like Berlioz, change things like the time signature, rhythms, instruments and phrasing and see what happens

×