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Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
Feminist Film Theory Quiz
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Feminist Film Theory Quiz

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Quiz to re-cap feminist film theory

Quiz to re-cap feminist film theory

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  • 1. A2 Film QUIZ TIME
  • 2. 30 points up for grabs . Winners win chocolate
  • 3. Question 1
    • Fill in the missing words:
    • Although it may appear that “gazing” is merely looking at someone, it signifies a relationship of _ _ _ _ r , in which the holder of the gaze is superior to the
    • _ _ j _ _ _ of the gaze.
    2 points
  • 4. Question 2
    • What 2 words can be used to explain the pleasures of looking
    2 points
  • 5. Question 3
    • According to Mulvey, two processes work together in cinematic texts:
    • Voyeuristic o _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tion of female characters
    • Narcissistic i _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tion with male characters
    2 points
  • 6. Question 4
    • As a result of these processes is the audience/ spectator masculinized or feminised ?
    1 point
  • 7. Question 5
    • Based on Freudian theory, the meaning of woman is sexual difference – her lack of penis implies a threat of castration and unpleasure.
    • How is this resolved in the cinematic text – name 2 possible routes ?
    2 points
  • 8. Question 6
    • How does Mulvey’s theory view the spectator: passive or active ?
    • Extra points for explaining why…
    1 point 2 points
  • 9. Question 7
    • Describe a sequence from any given text that supports Mulvey’s theory.
    3 points
  • 10. Question 8
    • Jackie Stacey looks at how audiences use and make meanings from texts , (whereas Mulvey looks at how the audience is constructed by the text ).
    • How does Stacey’s theory view the audience: active or passive ?
    2 points
  • 11. Question 9
    • Name the 3 pleasures that Stacey states cinema-goers get from texts
    3 points
  • 12. Question 10
    • Who introduced ‘ Queer Theory ’?
    • What do they consider gender is?
    1 point 1 point
  • 13. Question 11
    • Name/describe sequences from The Piano that demonstrate the power of:
    • The gaze (in general)
    • The male gaze
    • The female gaze
    3 points
  • 14. Question 12
    • Fill in the gaps…
    • The theme of c_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ relates to p_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.
    • Ada resists by being _ _ _ _.
    3 points
  • 15. Question 13
    • Name a scene from Holy Smoke that demonstrates the blurring of gender boundaries ?
    • How does Campion try to unmask female sexuality ?
    2 points
  • 16. A2 Film ANSWER TIME
  • 17. Question 1
    • Fill in the missing words:
    • Although it may appear that “gazing” is merely looking at someone, it signifies a relationship of , in which the holder of the gaze is superior to the
    • of the gaze.
    2 points power object
  • 18. Question 2
    • What 2 words can be used to explain the pleasures of looking
    2 points scopophilia voyeurism
  • 19. Question 3
    • According to Mulvey, two processes work together in cinematic texts:
    • Voyeuristic o _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tion of female characters
    • Narcissistic i _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ tion with male characters
    2 points objectification identification
  • 20. Question 4
    • As a result of these processes is the audience/ spectator masculinized or feminised ?
    1 point masculinized
  • 21. Question 5
    • The meaning of woman is sexual difference – her lack of penis implies a threat of castration and unpleasure.
    • How is this resolved in the cinematic text – name 2 possible routes ?
    2 points Punishment or Fetish Object
  • 22. Question 6
    • How does Mulvey’s theory view the spectator: passive or active ?
    • Extra points for explaining why…
    1 point 2 points passive The text is seen as constructing the audience as male – audience doesn’t make meaning
  • 23. Question 7
    • Describe a sequence from any given text that supports Mulvey’s theory.
    3 points
  • 24. Question 8
    • Jackie Stacey looks at how audiences use and make meanings from texts , (whereas Mulvey looks at how the audience is constructed by the text ).
    • How does Stacey’s theory view the audience: active or passive ?
    2 points active
  • 25. Question 9
    • Name the 3 pleasures that Stacey states cinema-goers get from texts
    3 points escapism identification consumption
  • 26. Stacey
    • Escapism – cinema offers solutions to social problems – a utopian experience
    • Identification –stars can generate fantasies of power, control and self-confidence
    • Consumption – Rather than seeing the text/spectator position as being one of domination, exploitation and control -sees consumption is a site of negotiated meanings and resistance.
  • 27. Question 10
    • Who introduced ‘ Queer Theory ’?
    • What do they consider gender is?
    1 point 1 point Medhurst and Simpson performance
  • 28. Question 11
    • Name/describe sequences from The Piano that demonstrate the power of:
    • The gaze (in general)
    • The male gaze
    • The female gaze
    3 points
  • 29. Question 12
    • Fill in the gaps…
    • The theme of c_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ relates to p_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.
    • Ada resists by being _ _ _ _.
    3 points colonization patriarchy mute
  • 30. Question 13
    • Name a scene from Holy Smoke that demonstrates the blurring of gender boundaries ?
    • How does Campion try to unmask female sexuality ?
    2 points
  • 31. Exam Questions
    • How important is gender in the critical analysis of films? Refer in detail to your own studies.
    • According to Mulvey – gender is important. Films are structured for the male gaze. The Piano demonstrates the power of the gaze and tries to subvert it – privileging the female gaze and centering the female protagonist. However according to Stacey, gender is not all important and audiences can get pleasure from other aspects of the text. In addition, Medhurst and Simpson claim gender is a performance and therefore fluid as exemplified in Performance, All About My Mother and Holy Smoke. Clover states we engage in transgender identification – so whether the hero is male or female doesn’t matter. Each presents a compelling argument/theory and we can find texts that support / demonstrate each theory. In conclusion...
  • 32. Exam Questions
    • Taking the gendered perspective when viewing films allows us to see them in a different way and makes us more aware of the underlying meanings of the narrative (myths), the representation of roles in society and how cinematic devices can privilege certain points of view. However, I tend to agree with Stacey in that we the audience are active in how we read a text – whatever gender/sex.
  • 33. IMPORTANT
    • Ensure you make continual references to texts:
        • Sequences
        • Techniques (cinematography, mise-en-scene etc.)
        • Themes
        • Representations of gender

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