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Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible
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Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible

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A presentation by Professor Tom Welton of Imperial College - given at the Open Science Showcase held by the Royal Society of Chemistry on 26 February 2014.

A presentation by Professor Tom Welton of Imperial College - given at the Open Science Showcase held by the Royal Society of Chemistry on 26 February 2014.

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Transcript

  • 1. Open Data: Touching Upon the Intangible Prof. Tom Welton Department of Chemistry Imperial College
  • 2. Open Access Pre-Finch/RCUK • A social movement spearheaded by academics. • Science is for all and not just those who can afford to pay for it. • To open science to the public, who did after all pay for most of it. • To wrest scientific publishing from money- grabbing commercial publishers.
  • 3. Open Access Post-Finch/RCUK • Overbearing government control opposed by academics. • An attack on academic freedom. • A disaster in the making that will take money away from research and prevent the free publication of results. • A gift to money-grabbing commercial publishers. • Patchy uptake.
  • 4. How did we get here? • Academics are as mad as a bag of cats. • Steam ahead and they’ll get used to it and move on to the next catastrophe/attack on their academic freedom.
  • 5. View from the HoD’s office • Policies and procedures are helpful to determine how things can happen. • They are not why things happen. • The most effective way to ensure that something will not happen is for the HoD to give an instruction that it should. • The best way to get an academic to do anything is for it to be their idea.
  • 6. Intangible Value • Is there something that we are not considering? • Which is more valuable?
  • 7. Reasons to Publish What the publishers say • The RSC: – To be foremost in the world at promoting and developing the chemical sciences for the benefit of society. • The ACS: – Improving people’s lives through the transforming power of chemistry. • Wiley: – aspires to be a valued and respected provider of products and services that make important contributions to advances in knowledge and understanding...
  • 8. Reasons to Publish What academics say • To extend the benefits of science to the wider world. • To have the greatest impact for my research. • To advance the subject. • Communicate my results to peers. • Advance my career. • Attract further funding.
  • 9. Reasons to Publish The Terrible Truth
  • 10. Reasons to Publish The Terrible Truth • Perceived Status!
  • 11. Reasons to Publish The Terrible Truth • Perceived Status! • Prestige
  • 12. Reasons to Publish The Terrible Truth • Perceived Status! • Prestige • Reputation –“Of course we don’t take league tables seriously, but we are number ten in the…”
  • 13. Reasons to Publish The Terrible Truth • Perceived Status! • Prestige • Reputation – “Of course we don’t take league tables seriously, but we are number ten in the…” • These intangible benefits are just as important as tangible benefits.
  • 14. What are we trying to achieve? • To use open data to extend the benefits of science to the wider world. • To do the best science possible. • To provide data in useable form • To provide data in a sustainable way. • To provide tools that allow data to be used imaginatively. • This needs more than regulatory compliance.
  • 15. What do we need to decide? • Do we really mean all data? – Oops! I dropped the flask. – Who answers this? – Who is trusted to do the curation? – Is the answer different for different subjects? • Does ‘freely available’ mean the same as ‘free to make money from’? • Who holds the data? – University repositories, professional bodies, publishers?
  • 16. How will it happen? • Somebody needs to do the practical stuff. – Businesses must be allowed to succeed. – Is it O.K. to have businesses that sell our own data back to us? – Data must be protected from being lost behind a single commercial product. • Academics need to supply the data in the best possible form. – This requires that prestige be delivered for doing so.

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