Using Technology inNursing Education      Informatics for Nurse Educators MNE 605             Roberts Wesleyan CollegeMary...
SMART BOARDS
objectivesAT THE CONCLUSION OF THIS PRESENTATION THELEARNER WILL:1. DISCUSS THE USE OF SIMULATION IN NURSINGEDUCATION.2. D...
Evolution of Simulation in          Health CareHarvey CardiologySimmanSimbaby
High Fidelity Simulation                            A solution to preparing                            competent nurses to...
Advantages of HPS in Nursing                                        Protects patients                                   Pr...
Student-Centered Learning•   Collaboration•   Communication•   Standardized curriculum•   Minimizes variances to learning
Interactive learning in  today’s classroom
Smart boards allows the application of various tools to benefit active     learning in the classroom
Smart Boards support nursing education through                                   Distance                                 ...
VIRTUALTOURS     DEFINITIONA VIRTUAL TOUR IS ASIMULATION OF ALOCATION OREXPERIENCE.
ADVANTAGES OF VIRTUAL TOURS INTHE NURSING CLASSROOM                1. The class can go any where in                the wor...
VIRTUAL REALITIES   SECOND LIFE      AVATARS
AN EXAMPLE OF A VIRTUAL TOUR
Using Technology inNursing Educationsupports facultydevelopment throughtechnology to educatestudents for 21stcentury healt...
References Bell, M. ( 2002). Why use an interactive whiteboard: Abaker’s         dozen reasons. Teachers Net Gazette.     ...
References continuedHowse, E, Hamilton, D., Symons, L., (2000). The effect of a       SMART Board interactive whiteboard o...
References continuedhttp://slfieldtrip211sp08.blogspot.com/2008/05/ms-field-         trip.htmlhttp://www.caboces.org/iss/d...
References continuedSchlairet, M. C. (2011). Simulation in an undergraduate        nursing curriculum: Implementation and ...
Techonology in Nursing Education
Techonology in Nursing Education
Techonology in Nursing Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Techonology in Nursing Education

2,140 views
1,920 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Education
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,140
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Using technology in nursing education. Informatics for Nurse educators at Roberts Wesleyan College. Presented by Mary Attridge, Karen Green and Susan Stell
  • Welcome to informatics for the nurse educator. The use of modern technology has not only enhanced nursing education but increased access to an education to thousands. In this presentation we will explore three different technologies that are currently available for use by the nurse educator.
  • KAREN WILL DISCUSS THE USE OF SMART BOARDS IN THE CLASSROOM
  • AND SUSAN WILL BE PRESENTING VIRTUAL TOURS
  • The use of simulation in nursing education has evolved over the last fifty years. In the 1950’s, nursing students in the United Kingdom had access to Mrs. Chase, a life sized mannequin used to practice assessment skills. In the late sixties, medical students utilized Harvey Cardiology, a life size replication of a human which possessed approximately 25 heart functions reflective of the healthy or not so healthy heart. Blood pressure, pulse, respirations and various heart murmurs could be manipulated to enhance clinical assessment skills. At the turn of our current century, digital technology has refined human patient simulation, also referenced as high fidelity simulation using human patient simulators to augment nursing education by reinforcing knowledge, enhancing clinical performance and inspiring confidence and self- efficacy. Simman and simbaby are examples of high fidelity simulators that have the capacity to electronically interact with humans. They possess human qualities that provide students with the opportunity to experience real life situations in a controlled setting. The characteristics of the mannequins display human-like qualities that can be manipulated to challenge the learner. Cardiac and respiratory arrests, hemorrhaging, and complications with labor and delivery are all scenarios that can stimulate critical thinking in a controlled learning environment.
  • In an effort to address the nursing shortage, decreasing number of masters and doctoral prepared nursing educators, limited availability of facilities to support clinical opportunities the integration of high fidelity simulation provides a solution to preparing competent, clinically prepared nurses to enter the workforce. Utilization of high fidelity simulation is dependent on the financial resources of the institution. Human patient simulation varies from designated learning areas within the walls of nursing schools to hospital based simulation centers encompassing a spectrum of opportunities. These include multiple tools to enhance the experience such as designated observation areas, computers, monitors, high definition audiovisual equipment and debriefing rooms.
  • Although low fidelity simulation such as written case studies and role playing are useful tools guiding nursing students to make connections, the high fidelity simulation provides an opportunity for the learner to respond to a real life hypothetical clinical situation requiring implementation of assessment skills, nursing theory and the nursing process. Human patient simulation protects patients from unnecessary risks, prevents harmful mistakes, ensures patient and student safety. Mannequins are digitally manipulated to replicate a situation requiring students to use critical thinking, problem solving strategies and team communication. Debriefing enables the student to hear constructive feedback in a non-punitive fashion. Students can practice skills and remediate decision making if necessary to enhance competency.
  • Using a simulated learning environment which is student- centered reinforces connections utilizing the psychomotor, affective and cognitive learning domains to promote an educational and safe learning experience. The goal of using high fidelity simulation is to prepare clinically competent nurses to apply critical thinking based on experience from a simulated scenario. Integrating human patient simulation facilitates team collaboration and communication and provides educators with the capability to standardize curriculum with minimal variances so all receive that same instruction.
  • A virtual tour is a simulation of a location or experience. A tour can be made up of narration, text, sound effect, and images. The first virtual tour was a museum tour of Duddle castle in England in 1994. Since then virtual tours have been developed for all disciplines and are one tool used to enhance the nursing classroom
  • Second life is a three dimensional on line virtual world developed by Linden Lab. Students and teachers can interact with one another through avatars. Nurse educators can enhance the learning experience for their students by incorporating second life into the classroom.
  • Three dimensional virtual tours allow the nursing student to experience, through an avatar, what the patient is experiencing. These tours can be taken alone, in groups, or by the entire class. What a great way to get to know and understand your pt or experience nursing in another country.
  • Techonology in Nursing Education

    1. 1. Using Technology inNursing Education Informatics for Nurse Educators MNE 605 Roberts Wesleyan CollegeMary Attridge R.N. BSN, OCNKaren Green R.N. BSNSusan Stell R.N. BSN
    2. 2. SMART BOARDS
    3. 3. objectivesAT THE CONCLUSION OF THIS PRESENTATION THELEARNER WILL:1. DISCUSS THE USE OF SIMULATION IN NURSINGEDUCATION.2. DISCUSS THE USE OF SMART BOARDS INNURSING EDUCATION.3. DISCUSS THE USE OF VIRTUAL FIELD TRIPS ANDVIRTUAL TOURS IN NURSING EDUCATION.4. DISCUSS THE ADVANTAGE OF THE USE OF THESETHREE TYPES OF TECHNOLOGY IN NURSINGEDUCATION.
    4. 4. Evolution of Simulation in Health CareHarvey CardiologySimmanSimbaby
    5. 5. High Fidelity Simulation A solution to preparing competent nurses to enter the workforceHospital-based simulation Nursing schools
    6. 6. Advantages of HPS in Nursing Protects patients Prevent harmful mistakesEnsures patientand student safety Debriefing enables constructive feedback
    7. 7. Student-Centered Learning• Collaboration• Communication• Standardized curriculum• Minimizes variances to learning
    8. 8. Interactive learning in today’s classroom
    9. 9. Smart boards allows the application of various tools to benefit active learning in the classroom
    10. 10. Smart Boards support nursing education through Distance Learning Multiple Intelligences Tactile Learners Audio / Visual Learners Group Interaction
    11. 11. VIRTUALTOURS DEFINITIONA VIRTUAL TOUR IS ASIMULATION OF ALOCATION OREXPERIENCE.
    12. 12. ADVANTAGES OF VIRTUAL TOURS INTHE NURSING CLASSROOM 1. The class can go any where in the world without leaving the classroom. 2. The student can experience a situation or diagnosis they may never come across in clinical. 3. The student can have the full experience from beginning to end and not be limited to clinical time 4. Allows access to more students then a clinical situation would permit 5. Study and training tool 6. Help prepare students for their clinical experiences
    13. 13. VIRTUAL REALITIES SECOND LIFE AVATARS
    14. 14. AN EXAMPLE OF A VIRTUAL TOUR
    15. 15. Using Technology inNursing Educationsupports facultydevelopment throughtechnology to educatestudents for 21stcentury healthcarepractice to help themgrow into competentnurses.
    16. 16. References Bell, M. ( 2002). Why use an interactive whiteboard: Abaker’s dozen reasons. Teachers Net Gazette. Retrieved December 20, 2011 from http://teachers.net/gazette/JAN02/mabell.htmlBrewer, E. P. (2011). Successful techniques for usinghuman patient simulation in nursingeducation. Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, 43(3),311317.doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2011.01405.Hauber, R. P., Cormier, E., & Whyte I, (2010). Anexploration of the relationship between knowledgeand performance- related variables in high-fidelitysimulation: Designing instruction that promotesexpertise in practice. Nursing EducationPerspectives, 31(4), 242-246.
    17. 17. References continuedHowse, E, Hamilton, D., Symons, L., (2000). The effect of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard on concept learning, generation of ideas, group processes and user interaction satisfaction. Retrieved December, 18, 2011 from http://downloads01.smarttech.com/media/sitecore/en/p df/research_library/higher_ education/the_effect_of_a_smart_board_interactive_ whiteboard_on_concept_learning_generation_of_ideas_ group_processes_and_user_interaction_satisfaction.pdfhttp://shl.uiowa.edu/publications/lablink/201007/mtmercy.xml
    18. 18. References continuedhttp://slfieldtrip211sp08.blogspot.com/2008/05/ms-field- trip.htmlhttp://www.caboces.org/iss/distance-learning/virtual-field- tripsMechling, L., Gast, D., & Krupa, K. (2007). Impact of smart board technology: an investigation of sight word reading and observational learning. Journal Of Autism & Developmental Disorders, 37(10), 1869-1882.Reising, D. L., Carr, D. E., Shea, R. A., & King, J. M. (2011). Comparison of communication outcomes in traditiona versus simulation strategies in nursing and medical students. Nursing EducationPerspectives, 32(5), 323-327.
    19. 19. References continuedSchlairet, M. C. (2011). Simulation in an undergraduate nursing curriculum: Implementation and impact evaluation. Journal of Nursing Education, 50(10), 561-658.Schmidt, B., & Stewart, S. (2010). Implementing the virtual world of Second Life into community nursing theory and clinical courses. Nurse Educator, 35(2), 74-78. doi:10.1097/NNE.0b013e3181ced999Skiba,D, (2009). Emerging technologies center nursing education 2.0: a second look at Second Life. Nursing Education Perspectives, 30(2), 129-131.

    ×