Invasives Workshop for Gardeners 2.18.11

3,196 views
3,195 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,196
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2,448
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Invasives Workshop for Gardeners 2.18.11

  1. 1. Invasive Species 101: A Primer for Gardeners Robert Emanuel, Ph.D.Water Resources and Community Development Faculty, Tillamook and Clatsop counties
  2. 2. IntroductionWhat are invasive species?Why should we care?Biology & managementSome common invadersWhat can gardeners do about them?Resources for more information.
  3. 3. Invasive species means an alien specieswhose introduction does or is likely tocause economic or environmental harmor harm to human health.
  4. 4. Biological invaders destroy habitats or  out‐compete native plants and  animals. Why should we care?Invasive species costs Americans about  $143 billion/year! At least 30 new potential biological  invaders enter the US every day…
  5. 5. Understanding Biological Invasions
  6. 6. Definitions: Invasive Plants “Weed” Exotics A plant (non‐native) growing  where you do Lots of beneficial  not want it.species: Crops, pasture, forestry  “Noxious”& ornamentals. A regulatory  designation. “Invasive” Spreads outside of  Natives cultivation, and  Co‐evolution  causes human,  with other  environmental,  species, our  economic harm. natural heritage
  7. 7. What makes a plant invasive?Lack normal environmental constraintsFast growth and reproductionHighly adaptable a wide range of conditionsOften can transform their environmentPromoted by new or existing disturbancesLess biodiversity in the native ecosystemSometimes work with other invasive species
  8. 8. Key Stages in Plant Invasions New Range Limits? Escape Adaptation? Lag Time Invasion IntroductionArea Infested Time
  9. 9. The Wildfire Model
  10. 10. How do we manage invasive plants?Prevention *Quarantine before introductionMonitoring & mappingChemical treatment (herbicides)Biological controls (biocontrol)Cultural treatment (hand pulling, cutting, etc.)
  11. 11. Some Invasive Species
  12. 12. Photo ‐ knotweed Japanese Knotweed: Fallopia cuspidatum
  13. 13. Glenn Miller, ODAGiant Knotweed: Fallopia sachalinese
  14. 14. Himalayan Knotweed: Polygonum polystachyum
  15. 15. Photo ‐ knotweed  Knotweed: Fallopia x bohemicum
  16. 16. knotzillaweed?
  17. 17. Photo ‐ English ivyEnglish Ivy: Hedera helix
  18. 18. English Ivy Photos – black walnut tree covered 2002 by English ivy 2006
  19. 19. Policeman’s Helmet: Impatiens gladulifera
  20. 20. Garlic Mustard, Alliaria petiolata
  21. 21. Parrot feather, Myriophyllum aquaticum
  22. 22. Photo: OSUYellow Flag Iris: Iris pseudacorus
  23. 23. Photo: WikimediaOld Man’s Beard: Clematis vitalba
  24. 24. Old Man’s Beard: Clematis vitalba
  25. 25. Shining Geranium, Geranium lucidum
  26. 26. Lynn Ketchum, OSU EESC 
  27. 27. Photo: University of GeorgiaHerb Robert: Geranium robertianum
  28. 28. Spurge Laurel: Daphne laureola
  29. 29. Photo ‐ butterfly bush infestation in  Lane Co.Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii) Photo: OSU
  30. 30. Photo – butterfly bush infestation in  Lane Co.Butterfly Bush: Buddleja davidii
  31. 31. Purple Loosestrife: Lythrum salicaria
  32. 32. English Holly: Ilex aquifolium
  33. 33. Lynn Ketchum, OSU EESCCommon Gorse: Ulex europaeus
  34. 34. French Broom: Genista monspessulana
  35. 35. Portuguese Broom: Cytisus striatus
  36. 36. Jubata Grass:  Cortaderia jubata
  37. 37. Fennel: Foeniculum vulgare
  38. 38. But wait! There’s MORE!
  39. 39. Cotoneaster: Cotoneaster spp.
  40. 40. Photo: Kurt W. HeckerothPetasites japonica var. giganteum
  41. 41. Giant Reed: Arundo donax
  42. 42. Photo: University of Georgia Hydrilla verticillata
  43. 43. Photo: Nancy Ness, Grays Harbor, WA; insert: King CountyYellow Archangel: Lamiastrum galeobdolon
  44. 44. Orange Hawkweed: Hieracium aurantiacum
  45. 45. Capeweed: Arctotheca calendula
  46. 46. Ice Plants:  Mesembryanthemum, Lampranthus, Delosperma, Carpobrotus
  47. 47. Periwinkle: Vinca major
  48. 48. Crimson Fountain Grass: Pennisetum setaceum
  49. 49. Tree of Heaven: Ailanthus altissima Photo: USFS
  50. 50. Black Locust: Robinia pseudoacacia
  51. 51. Orange wisteria: Sesbania punicea
  52. 52. Lollipop Tree: Myoporum laetum
  53. 53. Salt Cedar: Tamarix ramosissima
  54. 54. Only you can prevent the invasion!
  55. 55. What can gardeners do?Know the enemy & teach others about themGrow native & non‐invasive wherever possibleHelp others to do the sameHelp the public with information on treatmentMonitor and report new invadersCheck clothes, vehicles, pets when out & about
  56. 56. What can gardeners do?Don’t share unless you know it’s not invasiveCheck seed mixes before you buy themStay away from generic wildflower mixturesWatch for hitchhikers in nursery stockUse weed‐free soil and mulchWatch introductions for aggressive behaviorDon’t dump your yard clippings in the wild!
  57. 57. If you have a known invasive  (but can’t part with it)Deadhead faithfullyUse root barriersDispose of plant material properly—bagged in the garbage or burned (completely)Please don’t share your invader with others! Contain it, control it, or cage it!
  58. 58. For Water GardenersAlways wash new introductions (think snails)Keep water garden separate from native watersNever dump water garden materials or water into native watersResearch your plants for invasive potential—many commonly used aquatics are!
  59. 59. Some Resources
  60. 60. http://plants.usda.gov/java/noxiousDriver
  61. 61. www.plantright.org
  62. 62. Robert M. Emanuel, Ph.D.Water Resources & Community DevelopmentTillamook & Clatsop counties2204 Fourth StreetTillamook, OR 97141(503) 842‐5708 X 2   robert.emanuel@oregonstate.edublogs.oregonstate.edu/h2onc

×