What the European Union’s tourism policy means                 for Ireland                       Ray Keaney         IHI Ho...
Introduction• Background to tourism policy in the EU• New framework for tourism• Lessons for Ireland
Background to tourism policy in the EU• Policymakers slow to put political structures in place  to support tourism develop...
The Lisbon Treaty• Article 195 provides a legal basis for the  development of a coherent policy approach to  tourism• The ...
Key drivers of change• Economics:   – 1.8 million tourism businesses in Europe   – 12% of all jobs   – 10% of EU’s GDP• Pr...
The Commission’s framework• Objectives  – Stimulate competitiveness in the European tourism sector  – Consolidate the imag...
MFF 2014-2020• Overall budget €1,025 billion• Tourism related finances can be found in the  following proposals:   – Commo...
How should Ireland respond?• Global Irish Economic Forum 2011 recommended:   – The development of a strategic plan for the...
The challenges• Tourism sector is fragmented• Knowledge base is weak• Tourism is less visible than other sectors of the Ir...
Lessons for Ireland• Develop tourism policy initiatives to stimulate long-  term job creation and economic growth• Invest ...
Actions needed1. Industry groups should identify issues of strategic   importance and adopt a common agenda3. Government s...
Conclusion• The EU tourism framework offers Ireland a unique  opportunity• The choice is between a compelling future or  g...
Thank You
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Ihi conference may 2012

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Ihi conference may 2012

  1. 1. What the European Union’s tourism policy means for Ireland Ray Keaney IHI Hospitality Managers’ Conference May 2012
  2. 2. Introduction• Background to tourism policy in the EU• New framework for tourism• Lessons for Ireland
  3. 3. Background to tourism policy in the EU• Policymakers slow to put political structures in place to support tourism development in EU• Little direct intervention in tourism• Influence stemmed from policies in other areas e.g. transport, environment and consumer protection
  4. 4. The Lisbon Treaty• Article 195 provides a legal basis for the development of a coherent policy approach to tourism• The EU has specific powers to direct tourism activity to complement actions of member states• Article 195 excludes any harmonisation at European level relating to tourism
  5. 5. Key drivers of change• Economics: – 1.8 million tourism businesses in Europe – 12% of all jobs – 10% of EU’s GDP• Projected growth of international tourist arrivals to Europe: – An extra 240 million by 2020 – An extra 355 million by 2030
  6. 6. The Commission’s framework• Objectives – Stimulate competitiveness in the European tourism sector – Consolidate the image and profile of Europe – Promote the development of sustainable, responsible and high quality tourism – Maximise the potential of EU financial policies and instruments for developing tourism
  7. 7. MFF 2014-2020• Overall budget €1,025 billion• Tourism related finances can be found in the following proposals: – Common Strategic Framework €336 billion – Horizon 2020 €80 billion – Erasmus for All €19 billion – COSME €2.5 billion – Creative Europe €1.8 billion
  8. 8. How should Ireland respond?• Global Irish Economic Forum 2011 recommended: – The development of a strategic plan for the tourism sector – A vision for Ireland to become ‘the best small country in the world to do tourism’• The government’s policy advisory board, Forfás, recommended in 2011 that: – export opportunities in tourism should be addressed vigorously – allocation of government resources should better reflect current and future opportunities
  9. 9. The challenges• Tourism sector is fragmented• Knowledge base is weak• Tourism is less visible than other sectors of the Irish economy• Successive governments have prioritised the science and technology and agri-food sectors• Lack of joined-up thinking at the national, regional and local level• Focus on ‘short-term wins’ at the expense of strategic development
  10. 10. Lessons for Ireland• Develop tourism policy initiatives to stimulate long- term job creation and economic growth• Invest in tourism innovation, research and development• Give the tourism sector a focus equal to that of the agriculture and food, science and ICT sectors• Change the structures to facilitate the strategic development of Irish tourism
  11. 11. Actions needed1. Industry groups should identify issues of strategic importance and adopt a common agenda3. Government should lead the development of a strategic plan for Irish tourism5. Ireland should use its presidency of the European Council in 2013 to prioritise tourism in the MFF 2014-2020
  12. 12. Conclusion• The EU tourism framework offers Ireland a unique opportunity• The choice is between a compelling future or gradual decline• The challenge for industry and Government is to put in place the necessary structures to realise the sector’s potential
  13. 13. Thank You

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