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Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
Heizer mod e
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Heizer mod e

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  • This slide provides some reasons that capacity is an issue. The following slides guide a discussion of capacity.
  • This slide provides some reasons that capacity is an issue. The following slides guide a discussion of capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • This slide can be used to frame a discussion of capacity. Points to be made might include: - capacity definition and measurement is necessary if we are to develop a production schedule - while a process may have “maximum” capacity, many factors prevent us from achieving that capacity on a continuous basis. Students should be asked to suggest factors which might prevent one from achieving maximum capacity.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Operations Management Module E – Learning Curves PowerPoint presentation to accompany Heizer/Render Principles of Operations Management, 7e Operations Management, 9e© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–1
    • 2. Outline  Learning Curves in Services and Manufacturing  Applying the Learning Curve  Arithmetic Approach  Logarithmic Approach  Learning-Curve Coefficient Approach  Strategic Implications of Learning Curves  Limitations of Learning Curves© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–2
    • 3. Learning Objectives When you complete this module you should be able to: 1. Define a learning curve 2. Use the arithmetic concept to estimate times 3. Compute learning curve effects with the logarithmic and learning-curve coefficient approaches 4. Describe the strategic implications of learning curves© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–3
    • 4. Learning Curves  Based on the premise that people and organizations become better at their tasks as the tasks are repeated  Time to produce a unit decreases as more units are produced  Learning curves typically follow a negative exponential distribution  The rate of improvement decreases over time© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–4
    • 5. Learning Curve Effect Cost/time per repetition 0 Number of repetitions (volume) Figure E.1© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–5
    • 6. Learning Curves T x Ln = Time required for the nth unitT = unit cost or unit time of the first unitL = learning curve raten = number of times T is doubled First unit takes 10 labor-hours 70% learning curve is present Fourth unit will require doubling twice — 1 to 2 to 4 Hours required for unit 4 = 10 x (.7)2 = 4.9 hours© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–6
    • 7. Learning Curve Examples Learning- Curve Improving Cumulative Slope Example Parameters Parameter (%) Model -T Ford Price Units produced 86 production Aircraft Direct labor-hours Units produced 80 assembly per unit Equipment Average time to Number of 76 maintenance replace a group of replacements at GE parts Steel Production worker Units produced 79 production labor-hours per unit produced Table E.1© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–7
    • 8. Learning Curve Examples Learning- Curve Improving Cumulative Slope Example Parameters Parameter (%) Integrated Average price per Units 72 circuits unit produced Handheld Average factory Units 74 calculator selling price produced Disk memory Average price per Number of bits 76 drives bit Heart 1-year death rates Transplants 79 transplants completed Table E.1© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–8
    • 9. Uses of Learning Curves Internal: labor forecasting, scheduling, establishing costs and budgets External: supply chain negotiations Strategic: evaluation of company and industry performance, including costs and pricing© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E–9
    • 10. Arithmetic Approach  Simplest approach  Labor cost declines at a constant rate, the learning rate, as production doubles Nth Unit Produced Hours for Nth Unit 1 100.0 2 80.0 = (.8 x 100) 4 64.0 = (.8 x 80) 8 51.2 = (.8 x 64) 16 41.0 = (.8 x 51.2)© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 10
    • 11. Logarithmic Approach Determine labor for any unit, TN , by TN = T1(Nb) where TN = time for the Nth unit T1 = hours to produce the first unit b = (log of the learning rate)/ (log 2) = slope of the learning curve© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 11
    • 12. Logarithmic Approach Determine labor for any unit, TN , by TN = T1(Nb) Learning b where TN = time for the Nth unit Rate (%) T1 = hours to70 produce the – .515 first unit 75 – .415 b = (log of the learning rate)/(log 2) 80 – .322 = slope of 85 learning.234 the – curve 90 – .152 Table E.2© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 12
    • 13. Logarithmic Example Learning rate = 80% First unit took 100 hours TN = T1(Nb) T3 = (100 hours)(3b) = (100)(3log .8/log 2) = (100)(3–.322) = 70.2 labor hours© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 13
    • 14. Coefficient Approach TN = T1C where TN = number of labor- hours required to produce the Nth unit T1 = number of labor- hours required to produce the first unit C = learning-curve coefficient found in Table E.3© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 14
    • 15. Learning-Curve Coefficients Table E.3 70% 85% Unit Number (N) Unit Time Total Time Unit Time Total Time 1 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 2 .700 1.700 .850 1.850 3 .568 2.268 .773 2.623 4 .490 2.758 .723 3.345 5 .437 3.195 .686 4.031 10 .306 4.932 .583 7.116 15 .248 6.274 .530 9.861 20 .214 7.407 .495 12.402© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 15
    • 16. Coefficient Example First boat required 125,000 hours Labor cost = $40/hour Learning factor = 85% TN = T1C T4 = (125,000 hours)(.723) = 90,375 hours for the 4th boat 90,375 hours x $40/hour = $3,615,000 TN = T1C T4 = (125,000 hours)(3.345) = 418,125 hours for all four boats© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 16
    • 17. Coefficient Example Third boat required 100,000 hours Learning factor = 85% New estimate for the first boat 100,000 = 129,366 hours .773© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 17
    • 18. Strategic Implications To pursue a strategy of a steeper curve than the rest of the industry, a firm can: 1. Follow an aggressive pricing policy 2. Focus on continuing cost reduction and productivity improvement 3. Build on shared experience 4. Keep capacity ahead of demand© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 18
    • 19. Industry and Company Learning Curves In C du om st ry Price per unit (log scale) pa pr ny ice co st (c) Loss (b ) Gross profit (a) margin Figure E.2 Accumulated volume (log scale)© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 19
    • 20. Limitations of Learning Curves  Learning curves differ from company to company as well as industry to industry so estimates should be developed for each organization  Learning curves are often based on time estimates which must be accurate and should be reevaluated when appropriate© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 20
    • 21. Limitations of Learning Curves  Any changes in personnel, design, or procedure can be expected to alter the learning curve  Learning curves do not always apply to indirect labor or material  The culture of the workplace, resource availability, and changes in the process may alter the learning curve© 2008 Prentice Hall, Inc. E – 21

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