©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
MRKG 2312 E-Commerce
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
Agenda
• Roll Call
• Introduction
• Syllabus Review
• Introduction to eMarketing
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
Instructional Philosophy
• Out-Come based education
• Would rather discuss than lecture
• Requires...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
MRKG 2312 Outcomes
• Learn about the transformation of the traditional or physical
marketplace int...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
MRKG 2312 Outcomes (con’t)
• Understand how consumers use the Internet to research
and purchase go...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
If you want to survive...
• Read Material BEFORE the class discussion
• Use the additional resourc...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
Syllabus Overview
• Course grading
• Course calendar
• Assignment, midterm, and final overview
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1
E-Marketing 4/E
Judy Strauss, Adel I. El-Ansary, and Raymond Frost
Chapter 1: Convergence
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-2
Chapter 1 Objectives
• After reading Chapter 1 you will be able to:
• Explain how the Internet and...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-4
The Music Industry
• File sharing programs, such as KaZaA, enable
consumers to illegally download ...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-5
What will happen to the music industry?
• The actual cost of producing a CD is $10.17.
• Value = b...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-6
E-marketing Defined
• The use of information technology
• to create, communicate, and deliver valu...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-7
E-Business, E-Commerce, and
E-Marketing
• E-business is the continuous optimization of a
firm’s bu...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-8
The Internet
• A global network of interconnected networks.
• E-mail and data files move over phon...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-9
The Web Is One Aspect
of E-Marketing
E-mail
Internet
UPC Scanner
PDA
Cell Phone
Web
PC
Television
...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-10
Past, Present, and Future
• The first generation of e-business was like a
gold rush.
• From 2000-...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-11
Technology Peak of Trough of Slope of Plateau of
Trigger Inflated Disillusionment Enlightenment P...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-12
E-Marketing Today
• Power shift from sellers to buyers
• Marketing fragmentation: mass market to ...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-13
Consumer Control
• New technologies such as personal video
recorders (PVRs) and TiVo will increas...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-14
Improved Internet Strategy Integration
• Organizations will integrate information
technology seam...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-15
Refined Metrics
• Internet provides great deal of data, not all of
which is very useful.
• Tracki...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-16
Wireless Networking Increases
• Cell phones, PDAs and laptops connect to the
Internet via wireles...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-17
WiFi at Train Station in France
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-18
Appliance Convergence
• The receiving appliance is separate from the
media type.
• Computers can ...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-19
Semantic Web
The Semantic Web will utilize a standard
definition protocol that will allow users t...
©2006 Prentice Hall 1-20
Internet-Time Analogy
1949 Atomic1929 Quartz Crystal1600’s Mechanical1583 AD Pendulum3500 BC Sund...
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E marketing

  1. 1. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 MRKG 2312 E-Commerce
  2. 2. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 Agenda • Roll Call • Introduction • Syllabus Review • Introduction to eMarketing
  3. 3. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 Instructional Philosophy • Out-Come based education • Would rather discuss than lecture • Requires student preparation • Hate grading assignments • Especially LATE assignments • Use class interaction, assignments, quizzes and projects to determine if outcomes are met.
  4. 4. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 MRKG 2312 Outcomes • Learn about the transformation of the traditional or physical marketplace into the virtual marketplace through theoretical frameworks and applied practices and examples. • Understand the Internet environment and the opportunities and challenges organizations ( profit and nonprofit) face while entering into the electronic age. • Understand the following e-commerce components and be able understand the contribution of each component to electronic marketing • Business intelligence • Customer Relationship Management in electronic marketing • Supply Chain Management • Value Chains • Enterprise Resource Planning
  5. 5. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 MRKG 2312 Outcomes (con’t) • Understand how consumers use the Internet to research and purchase goods and services • Plan an electronic marketing strategy for a small business or for an e-commerce initiative within a larger firm • Be able to analyze and present an existing Case Study on electronic marketing • Be able to conduct research for, create and present a Case Study on electronic marketing
  6. 6. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 If you want to survive... • Read Material BEFORE the class discussion • Use the additional resources • ASK questions about what you didn’t understand in readings • DON’T do assignments and projects at last minute. • REVEIW lectures and notes • Seek HELP if you are having difficulties • OFFER feedback and suggestions to the instructor in a constructive manner
  7. 7. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 Syllabus Overview • Course grading • Course calendar • Assignment, midterm, and final overview
  8. 8. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-1 E-Marketing 4/E Judy Strauss, Adel I. El-Ansary, and Raymond Frost Chapter 1: Convergence
  9. 9. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-2 Chapter 1 Objectives • After reading Chapter 1 you will be able to: • Explain how the Internet and information technology offers benefits and challenges to consumers, businesses, marketers, and society. • Distinguish between e-business and e-marketing. • Describe the Internet and the use of intranets, extranets and the Web. • Explain how increasing buyer control is changing the marketing landscape. • Understand the distinction between information or entertainment as data, and the information receiving appliance used to view or hear it.
  10. 10. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-4 The Music Industry • File sharing programs, such as KaZaA, enable consumers to illegally download music. • The Recording Industry Association of America has sued over 400 consumers for piracy. • 14% U.S. consumers still download illegal files • CD sales plunged to $13 million in 1999; $10.6 billion in 2003 • Apple Computer introduced iTunes at .99 each. • http://www.usatoday.com/life/music/news/2006-01-04
  11. 11. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-5 What will happen to the music industry? • The actual cost of producing a CD is $10.17. • Value = benefits – costs • Value of CD vs MP3 to consumer? • Only $1.29 goes to the artist. • Value of CD vs MP3 to artist? • Online distribution makes sense. • What do you think will happen to the music industry? • What do you think will happen to the movie industry?
  12. 12. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-6 E-marketing Defined • The use of information technology • to create, communicate, and deliver value to customers. • for managing customer relationships to benefit the organization & stakeholders. • The result of information technology applied to traditional marketing.
  13. 13. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-7 E-Business, E-Commerce, and E-Marketing • E-business is the continuous optimization of a firm’s business activities through digital technology. • E-commerce is the subset of e-business focused on transactions. • E-marketing is one part of an organization’s e- business activities.
  14. 14. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-8 The Internet • A global network of interconnected networks. • E-mail and data files move over phone lines, cables and satellites. • Three types of networks form part of the Internet: • Intranet: network that runs internally in an organization. • Extranet: two joined networks that share information. • Web: how most people refer to the Internet.
  15. 15. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-9 The Web Is One Aspect of E-Marketing E-mail Internet UPC Scanner PDA Cell Phone Web PC Television Refrigerator Database Automobile
  16. 16. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-10 Past, Present, and Future • The first generation of e-business was like a gold rush. • From 2000-2002, over 500 Internet firms shut down in the U.S. • Almost 60% of dot-coms were profitable in the fourth quarter of 2003. • Today, the Internet is mainstream in industrialized nations. • 20 nations comprise 90% of all Internet users.
  17. 17. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-11 Technology Peak of Trough of Slope of Plateau of Trigger Inflated Disillusionment Enlightenment Profitability Expectation 1990-1996 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Equity Times Debt Times Positive Cash Flow Visibility Dot-Com Peak U.S. Recession E-Business Becomes “Just Business” E-Business Recovery Is Sweet
  18. 18. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-12 E-Marketing Today • Power shift from sellers to buyers • Marketing fragmentation: mass market to one customer • Death of distance • Time compression • Knowledge/database management is key • Marketing and technology: an interdisciplinary focus • Intellectual capital is important resource
  19. 19. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-13 Consumer Control • New technologies such as personal video recorders (PVRs) and TiVo will increase consumer control. • Convergence of television, radio, print, etc. • Customer-controlled entertainment, and shopping on demand.
  20. 20. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-14 Improved Internet Strategy Integration • Organizations will integrate information technology seamlessly into marketing strategy. • Multichannel marketing: Web site, retail store, and catalog • Integration of inventory databases • Integration of customer service across channels
  21. 21. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-15 Refined Metrics • Internet provides great deal of data, not all of which is very useful. • Tracking customer acquisition cost (CAC) and other key metrics is a critical marketing function still in its infancy. • Future metrics will provide better measures of performance, return on investment, etc. • Customer lifetime value • Profit derived from customer - CAC
  22. 22. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-16 Wireless Networking Increases • Cell phones, PDAs and laptops connect to the Internet via wireless modem worldwide. • Cafe' • Hotels and airports • Luxury liner (Airbus 380) • Airport, train stations • Customers will have information, entertainment and communication when, where and how they want it.
  23. 23. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-17 WiFi at Train Station in France
  24. 24. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-18 Appliance Convergence • The receiving appliance is separate from the media type. • Computers can receive digital radio and TV. • TV sets can receive the Web. • New types of “smart” receiving appliances will emerge. • Internet refrigerator is many digital appliances in one. • Global position systems (GPS) allow in-car communication and entertainment.
  25. 25. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-19 Semantic Web The Semantic Web will utilize a standard definition protocol that will allow users to find information based on its type, such as: • The next available appointment for a doctor • Details about an upcoming concert • Menu at the local restaurant • Represents the next huge advance: providing worldwide access to data on demand without effort. • http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/
  26. 26. ©2006 Prentice Hall 1-20 Internet-Time Analogy 1949 Atomic1929 Quartz Crystal1600’s Mechanical1583 AD Pendulum3500 BC Sundial Web is here in 2007

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