Alberdi et al ggaa 2013

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Alberdi et al ggaa 2013

  1. 1. This work has been funded by BATFARM Interreg-Atlantic Area Project (2009-1/071): Evaluation of best available techniques to decrease air and water pollution in animal farms. September 0 50 100 150 200 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 Time, h % Ventilation rate ∆ CH4 concentration CH4 Emission December 0 50 100 150 200 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 Time, h % Ventilation rate ∆ CH4 concentration CH4 Emission RESULTS • 52,000 hens were housed in a commercial laying hen unit, Gamiz-Fika (Basque Country). • CH4 concentration was measured continuously by a photoacoustic infrared gas analyzer (INNOVA 1412). •Ventilation rate was 5-minutes interval recorded. Each fan was individually calibrated using a hot wire anemometer (Testo 425). CONCLUSION •CH4 emission is affected by hourly pattern. •CH4 emission increased throughout the light hours. •There was not seasonality in CH4 emission. INTRODUCTION MATERIAL & METHODS •Scarce literature on methane (CH4) emission from laying hen houses. •Objective: to study daily pattern of CH4 emissions in a laying hen facility adapted to the welfare Directive (1999/74/EC) in two periods: cool (December) and mild (September). Figure 2. Average hourly pattern (calculated as % of mean value for each day) for each month. •Average CH4 emission (4.0 kg CH4 day-1) did not differ in both periods (P>0.05). •Ventilation rate was proportional to outdoor temperature (R2= 0.8 P<0.001), being more than two fold higher in September with respect to December, with 124 and 46 m3 day-1 hen-1. •Ventilation and CH4 emission (Figure 2) were affected by the hour of the day for both periods (P<0.05). • Methane emission was 30-40% higher during light hours (P<0.05). Figure 1: (a) Laying hen houses, (b) vertical tiered cage system , (c) air flow calibration, (d) gas monitoring system, (e) air collector. Alberdi, O.1*, Estellés, F.2, Arriaga, H.1, Calvet, S.2, Merino, P.1 (1) NEIKER-Tecnalia, Environment Quality Department, 48160, Derio (Bizkaia), SP (2) Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Institute of Animal Science and Technology, 46022, Valencia, SP *Corresponding author: oalberdi@neiker.net (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) DAILY VARIATION OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM A LAYING HEN FACILITY IN NORTHERN SPAIN

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