Shaping for peru tesol 2011

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This presentation supports a plenary that focuses on professional development in English Language Teaching in the Andean Region.

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  • Write 2 brief comments: 1 – If I can’t do what I want to do in class, it’s mainly because… 2 – The most important thing I try to accomplish in each class is…
  • Discuss getting students to think critically about grammar and vocabulary. Today, we will think critically about teaching. We are talking about reflective practice. I have 3 goals: 1 - to give a step-by-step approach to building a pro-professional development attitude 2 – to take a glance at professional development models 3 – to try to make this presentation as transfer-able as possible. I take issue with the plenary format and find myself struggling to undo expectations. Transfer of training works best when you can work in groups closer to a class size. To get around this, I will try to include some opportunities for you to speak with one another. There is another parallel here that is important. Going back to goal 1 – to look at building the right attitude toward professional development – I think that it is essential that a teacher not only model, but, if you will, “live” this attitude and, as such, be an example for her or his students. If a teacher’s willingness to try something new dies, how can we expect the students to be willing? Before beginning, two considerations: Consideration #1: How did you learn how to teach? Who taught you? Do you remember your first day in school? What did you do? How did you know what to do? Turn to a partner and share.
  • How many of you said that you learned to teach while a student at the university? How many wrote down that this began when you actually began teaching? Did any of you write that you learned even before you arrived at the university? Let’s look at Lortie’s 13,000 hour apprenticeship. (30 hrs/wk x 40 wks/yr x 12 yrs = 13,000 hours). Key: are we aware of this effect on our own teaching? Are we repeating generations of poor approaches? Are we continuing centuries of successful language teaching? Do we need to change? If so, how?
  • Consideration 2: If you wrote down an answer to “ If my lesson did not go well, it’s mainly because…” then get it ready. If you did not, that’s also ok. Please discuss your findings to that statement or the answer to this question with someone next to you. I’ll provide a hint. One of the main reasons I hear is classroom size. What are others? Let’s look at our list. Which of these is out of our control. I count only 3: classroom size, materials, time. But I think there are also strategies for dealing with these three as well. Classroom size: break into smaller groups. Materials: inject new resources. Time: extend class work to after-school. The others, I think, can be tackled directly through professional development.
  • Consideration 3 Why teachers are reluctant to go to professional development events. Tell story of someone messing with the slide. Can you help me correct it? I will try to touch upon the first five above and, indirectly, on the last one, which is also important.
  • One partner closes eyes. The other describes it to them. Tell them what you see!
  • Professor of Human Communication Study at California State University, Fullerton. Developed to help describe and understand cultural experiences -
  • Provide positive evaluation
  • Attributed to Karl Marx, in Communist Manifesto. Antithesis of all that teaching should be about: we need to teach others how to fish… for ideas But this does not work with teachers because we are supposedly in the most unselfish profession one can find. ACTIVITY: get teachers to change this into PD: Teach a teacher a new idea, and she can teach for a day. Sell a method, and a teacher can teach a specific kind of student in a certain way. Teach a teacher how to develop professionally, and you build a system where the teachers, students and school in general grow. NOTE: some language schools might think they have a monopoly on a certain approach, and only they can replicate it with success. While this may work for a few naïve customers, it will not work for a majority of learners. And as teachers, we should be suspicious of anyone who thinks they have the ultimate secret.
  • This photo shows a group of teachers watching a film clip of them giving sample lessons. Discuss how many are afraid of observation because they think it is evaluative; two seconds: tell someone sitting next to you that you’d like to observe their class (give them a good reason they should let you into their class); now let’s go one step further - the teacher being observed will will finish the sentence “Yes, and…” and provide some criteria. After doing this, ask: did any of you say, “Yes, and please let’s discuss my lesson afterward since I’d like some feedback.” Or, “Yes, and let’s discuss this before you come into my class so that you understand the context of the lesson you will observe.”
  • I will show an edited clip of one of the teachers. The module of this clip focuses on critical thinking. I would like you to try to answer some questions: How does has the teacher supported learning with visuals? What skills are covered? How much opportunity do the students have to speak? Are there any examples of critical thinking? What do you think came before the lesson? What would a good follow-up activity be?
  • Needs analysis – theme/speaker (syllabus) – logistics (schedules, space) – publicize – get feedback; use the teacher ass’n. Start with lesson plan swap shops or poster sessions!
  • Collaborative Study Groups, with participants taking turns as facilitator.
  • Students can be responsible for bringing in materials and creating activities - try warmer activities for a start. Do Tsui’s findings - find errors Take a few minutes, work with a partner, discuss which of these would work in your context/institution. Also, are there any ideas I have not mentioned?
  • What do you need to fish? What are the bare essentials? Write down. How many of you have actually fished? Moral: huge gap between knowledge and application.
  • Have a look at the visual here. The idea is to name the color of the words. Turn to a partner and see if you can do it. While sitting down (or standing if you have good balance), lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles with it. At the same time, repeatedly draw the number 6 in the air with your right hand. Your foot will change direction and without an awful lot of practice, there's nothing you can do to prevent it. I have these two examples here to prove a point. That it one thing to talk about new ideas and concepts, and it is another to actually try them out in the classroom. There is, unfortunately too often, a disconnect between our thoughts and our actions. What I am getting at here is TRANSFER. One can attend many workshops and professional development sessions; one can discuss strategies and theories with colleagues, but if one does not actually try to apply the ideas in class, then little is gained.
  • What do you need to fish? How many of you have actually fished? Moral: huge gap between knowledge and application.
  • Go back to your pieces of paper and pull out your notes on “ The most important thing I try to accomplish in each class is…” Let’s watch three teachers. Compare your notes. Explain GLAD: Guided Language Acquisition Design WHILE: take notes; determine the context of the teachers Post compare… Note how she speaks ON CAMERA! Note what is in the background (walls full of visuals) From SHAPING THE WAY…
  • Discuss getting students to think critically about grammar and vocabulary. Today, we will think critically about teaching. We are talking about reflective practice. I have 3 goals: 1 - to give a step-by-step approach to building a pro-professional development attitude 2 – to take a glance at professional development models 3 – to try to make this presentation as transfer-able as possible. I take issue with the plenary format and find myself struggling to undo expectations. Transfer of training works best when you can work in groups closer to a class size. To get around this, I will try to include some opportunities for you to speak with one another. There is another parallel here that is important. Going back to goal 1 – to look at building the right attitude toward professional development – I think that it is essential that a teacher not only model, but, if you will, “live” this attitude and, as such, be an example for her or his students. If a teacher’s willingness to try something new dies, how can we expect the students to be willing? Before beginning, two considerations: Consideration #1: How did you learn how to teach? Who taught you? Do you remember your first day in school? What did you do? How did you know what to do? Turn to a partner and share.
  • Shaping for peru tesol 2011

    1. 1. While waiting for this plenary to start, please complete these sentences on a scrap of paper… <ul><li>1 - If my lesson did not go well, it’s mainly because… </li></ul><ul><li>2 - The most important thing I try to accomplish in each class is… </li></ul><ul><li>http://reloandes.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://lima.usembassy.gov/relo2.html </li></ul>
    2. 2. Shaping the Way We Develop Professionally in the Andes David Fay Director, Regional English Language Office U.S. Embassy, Lima, Peru http://reloandes.com http://lima.usembassy.gov/relo2.html
    3. 3. Consider Lortie’s “13,000-hour apprenticeship of observation” <ul><li>Are these indelible imprints: </li></ul><ul><li>Good? </li></ul><ul><li>Bad? </li></ul><ul><li>Potentially both </li></ul>
    4. 4. What seem to be the biggest obstacles for English language teachers in Peru and in the region? <ul><li>Classes too large </li></ul><ul><li>Getting students to pronounce correctly </li></ul><ul><li>Motivating students to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher isolation from colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Poor level of English among teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Low quality of materials </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher motivation </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of teaching; methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Getting students to speak </li></ul><ul><li>Not enough time in curriculum for English </li></ul>
    5. 5. Why are so many teachers eager to develop professionally? <ul><li>There are so many opportunities to choose from </li></ul><ul><li>Lots of free time since school day is so short </li></ul><ul><li>All so eager to learn and try new methods </li></ul><ul><li>Feel comfortable in training environment (eager to use English with peers) </li></ul><ul><li>Often share weakness with other teachers; always ready to state they do not know everything </li></ul><ul><li>Tons of money with which to get to training site </li></ul>
    6. 6. 4 steps to help shape the way you develop professionally <ul><li>Have the right attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Expose yourself to new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt and try the new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to consider how the new ideas worked in your context </li></ul>
    7. 7. Describe what you see!
    8. 8. Stella Ting-Toomey’s 3 step process <ul><li>Describe </li></ul><ul><li>Interpret </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate </li></ul>
    9. 9. What do you see?
    10. 10. What do you see?
    11. 11. What do you see?
    12. 12. 4 steps to help shape the way you develop professionally <ul><li>Have the right attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Expose yourself to new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt and try the new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to consider how the new ideas worked in your context </li></ul>
    13. 13. A fish eat fish world? <ul><li>Sell a man a fish, and he can eat for a day. </li></ul>Teach a man to fish, and you lose a great business opportunity.
    14. 14. Accessing new ideas: Part I <ul><li>Classroom Observations </li></ul><ul><li>Team Teaching </li></ul>
    15. 15. http://oelp.uoregon.edu/shaping.html
    16. 16. Module 9: Critical Thinking <ul><li>Watch edited video clip at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5dodTlc1sc </li></ul>
    17. 17. Questions for Critical Thinking clip <ul><li>How does has the teacher supported learning with visuals? </li></ul><ul><li>What skills are covered? </li></ul><ul><li>How much opportunity do the students have to speak? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any examples of critical thinking? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think came before the lesson? What would a good follow-up activity be? </li></ul>
    18. 18. Accessing new ideas: Part II <ul><li>Mini-conference in institution: </li></ul><ul><li>cost effective </li></ul><ul><li>localized context </li></ul><ul><li>build confidence </li></ul><ul><li>build sprit de corps </li></ul><ul><li>(Read Brad Tipka’s Forum article for more info) </li></ul>
    19. 19. Accessing new ideas: Part III <ul><li>Form collaborative study groups </li></ul><ul><li>Keep dialogue journals with a peer or mentor ( Forum article by Diaz-Maggioli) </li></ul><ul><li>Write up and share short activities through newsletter; write review of new resource book </li></ul><ul><li>Practice English through book clubs, debate clubs, drama clubs, and tea parties </li></ul>
    20. 20. Accessing new ideas: For the truly brave! <ul><li>Allow students to ‘train’ you: bring in materials, create an activity, be responsible for a ‘warmer’ or ‘closer’ </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct action research: see Tsui’s article on how teachers collectively researched students’ reticence to participate in class </li></ul>
    21. 21. 4 steps to help shape the way you develop professionally <ul><li>Have the right attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Expose yourself to new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt and try the new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to consider how the new ideas worked in your context </li></ul>
    22. 22. Disconnect between theory and practice…
    23. 23. Key questions: <ul><li>What is the ideal context for the idea? </li></ul><ul><li>How is my context different? </li></ul><ul><li>What do I need to do to make this idea work? </li></ul><ul><li>What am I comfortable in trying? </li></ul>
    24. 24. 4 steps to help shape the way you develop professionally <ul><li>Have the right attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Expose yourself to new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Adapt and try the new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to consider how the new ideas worked in your context </li></ul>
    25. 25. Reflective Practice <ul><li>Were the goals of the session met? Why or why not? </li></ul><ul><li>What worked well? What didn’t? </li></ul><ul><li>Did learners act as expected? Why or why not? </li></ul><ul><li>How can the activity/lesson be improved to provide to provide opportunities for better learning? </li></ul>
    26. 26. Let’s see what others reflect upon: <ul><li>I believe that a good teacher… </li></ul><ul><li>The most important thing I try to accomplish in class every day is to… </li></ul>
    27. 27. Module 14: Reflective Teaching <ul><li>Watch edited video clip at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKVTh6HG-T4 </li></ul>
    28. 28. Shaping the Way We Develop Professionally in the Andes David Fay Director, Regional English Language Office U.S. Embassy, Lima, Peru http://reloandes.com http://lima.usembassy.gov/relo2.html

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