Regus Work:life Balance Index 2013Boomers struggle tofind their balanceWork:life balance improvement slows, but Generation...
1ContentsManagement summary............................................................................................2Ke...
2Management summaryMembers of Generations X and Y are more likelythan Baby Boomers to feel their work:life balancehas impr...
3Key findings and statistics•	 The Regus Work:life Balance Index reveals thatthe work:life balance rate of improvement has...
4IntroductionIt is one of the features of the current businessenvironment that, while millions of people around theworld a...
5Nevertheless, there is evidence that manyprofessionals feel that some balance can beachieved. A report by management cons...
6By contrast, the BRICS countries continue to leadthe field, as Figure 1 indicates, even though they allsaw their individu...
7Battle of the generationsThis year’s Index also considers the differing attitudesof members of two distinct workplace gro...
8Traditionally, Baby Boomers would have been proudof working hard and of being effective and productiveemployees. Now, the...
9Upsetting the balanceWorkers in general report being worn down by havingto do more work as a result of staff cutbacks in ...
10And yet a little under half of respondents believethat there is continued and consistent improvementin this area. With a...
11There is no doubt that these are challenging times.Businesses the world over – and not just in the highlyindustrialised ...
12Country highlightsAustraliaAustralia has seen a sharp fall in its Work:lifeBalance Index score – equal second largest –t...
13MethodologyOver 26,000 businessrespondents from over90 countries wereinterviewed duringJanuary 2013.The Regus Work:life ...
14About RegusRegus is the world’s largest provider of flexibleworkplaces, with products and services rangingfrom fully equ...
Copyright © 2013. Regus Plc. All rights reserved.Whilst every effort has been taken to verify the accuracy of this informa...
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  1. 1. Regus Work:life Balance Index 2013Boomers struggle tofind their balanceWork:life balance improvement slows, but GenerationsX and Y know how to get it right
  2. 2. 1ContentsManagement summary............................................................................................2Key findings and statistics............................................................................................3Introduction...............................................................................................................4The index.....................................................................................................................5Shifting balance............................................................................................................5Battle of the generations...............................................................................................7Bosses tip the scales....................................................................................................8Upsetting the balance...................................................................................................9Conclusion...............................................................................................................11Country highlights..................................................................................................12Methodology............................................................................................................13About Regus............................................................................................................14
  3. 3. 2Management summaryMembers of Generations X and Y are more likelythan Baby Boomers to feel their work:life balancehas improved in the past year. While Boomersare struggling with health issues and the needs ofageing parents, the younger generations believethey are achieving more at work, finds the latestRegus Work:life Balance Index, which assesseshow individuals are balancing the various elementsin their professional and home lives.The second iteration of the Index, which thisyear surveyed more than 26,000 professionalsin more than 90 countries, shows that the rateof improvement has slowed marginally over thepast year. A proportion of workers around theworld continue to suffer additional workloadstaken on as a result of workforce cuts in thedownturn and are spending less time at homeor with their families as a consequence. It is stillthe case that fewer than half of respondents areseeing continued and consistent improvement inbusinesses helping workers cut the often gruellingcommutes that are detrimental to the enjoymentof work.However, there are encouraging signs. The mythof the workaholic business owner has beenshattered as the people running organisations arefound to have a much better work:life balancethan employees. This finding endorses the long-held view that stress – a key element in measuringwork:life balance and enjoyment of work – isassociated less with hard work than with lack ofcontrol. Increasingly, business owners are seeingthe benefits of ensuring their employees sharethis sense of control through the adoption ofmore flexible working practices, leading to higherproductivity and talent retention.In view of the continuing difficult economicenvironment, it is understandable that the work:lifebalance rate of improvement has slowed. Butorganisations need to maintain momentumbecause research shows that work:life balanceis closely connected with business success. Oneway that businesses can make strides in the rightdirection is through a greater commitment toflexible working. This is a win-win to help improveworkers’ quality of life through reducing stressand related illnesses, while benefiting the businessthrough reductions in fixed office space andimprovements in productivity and retention.
  4. 4. 3Key findings and statistics• The Regus Work:life Balance Index reveals thatthe work:life balance rate of improvement hasslowed marginally since last year.• The overall Work:life Balance Index has fallenslightly to 120 compared to May 2012 when itwas 124.• Some indicators that point to the slowdownin improvement stem from the fact thatglobal workers are still experiencing the sameadditional workload taken on during thedownturn and not yet shared out among newstaff. Two fifths (42%) spend less time at home/with family than they used to because of work.• Just under half of respondents think thatbusinesses are making continued progress tocut gruelling commutes (49%).• But businesses need to keep up momentumgiven that work:life balance is intimatelyconnected to productivity and talent retention.1• Generations X & Y (123) are more likely to feelthat work:life balance has improved in the lastyear than jaded Baby Boomers (117), who arestruggling with their own deteriorating healthand the needs of ageing parents.2• Generations X & Y are also more likely to feelthey achieve more at work (81%) than BabyBoomers (69%).• Surprisingly, the workaholic business ownermyth is debunked as the Index reveals thatbusiness owners have a higher index value (124)than employees (115).• Business owners are also likely to enjoy workmore than last year (74%), compared withemployees (66%).• As they see market conditions improve and feelthey have made it through the worst part of thedownturn, it is understandable that businessowners should be feeling more positive aboutwork. This positivity, however, has not yetfiltered through to employees in the same wayand business owners need to urgently addressthe issue.• Flexible working is a way of improving work:lifebalance, which, according to 72% of workers,increases productivity,3so it’s a win-win solutionfor businesses and can improve the qualityof life of workers, help reduce stress andstress-related illness, save money onfixed office space, improve retention andincrease productivity.1 Mercer, Attraction andRetention Survey, 20122 My PA, Baby BoomersStriving For Work-LifeBalance, 30th January2012; HR Hero, Boomers(and their employers) facework/life challenges, 17thApril 2012; American Instituteof CPAs, What Is ThisWork/Life Balance EveryoneKeeps Talking About?,18th July 20113 Regus, Flexibility drivesproductivity, 2011
  5. 5. 4IntroductionIt is one of the features of the current businessenvironment that, while millions of people around theworld are seeking ‘quality jobs’, millions of others havemore work than they might want. Across the countriesthat are members of the OECD (Organisation forEconomic Co-operation and Development), 12 percent of men work ‘very long hours’ (i.e. more than50 hours a week on average). Women fare better– fewer than 5 per cent work very long hours.4But that shortfall is made up by extensive amountsof unpaid domestic work because the averagewoman in an OECD country spends an averageof 279 minutes a day on cooking, cleaning orcaring, compared with just 131 minutes for hermale counterpart.5Work:life balance is oftenviewed as an issue that only affects ‘high-fliers’trying to ‘have it all’. But it is clearly much morewidespread. For instance, reports suggest that 18per cent of European workers think that they havea poor work:life balance.6The extent of long hours varies considerablybetween OECD countries, with a few surprises.The UK and the USA are close to the overallaverage, with 11.7 per cent and 10.9 per centof the workforce respectively working very longhours.7In Germany, the figure is 5.1 per cent, littlemore than the 4.5 per cent recorded in Belgiumand rather less than the 8.6 per cent seenin France.8A recent report in Australia has found thatfull-time working women’s dissatisfaction with theirwork:life balance had almost doubled from 15.9per cent to 27.5 per cent between 2008 and 2012,while men’s had hardly changed.9Mexico andBrazil are other countries with a high proportion– 28.9 per cent and 12.5 per cent respectively – ofthe workforce working long hours.10In 2012 theBrazilian government introduced a new law to makeanswering emails after hours count as overtime.11Canada, which, according to the OECD, has 3.9per cent of workers working very long hours, wouldtherefore appear to be in a much better position thanits southern neighbour, the USA.12This improvementis reflected in the Work:life Balance Index, which sawthe largest score increase in Canada.Meanwhile, as many western countries are strugglingto maintain the progress made in this area in theface of extreme economic pressures, many Asiannations are changing their approach. Japan has longbeen noted for the devotion of its workers and this isconfirmed by the OECD finding of 29.5 per cent ofthe workforce working very long hours.13However,companies such as Toyota and Nissan have beguninitiatives to limit overtime, introduce telecommutingand enforce breaks.14Eighty-two per cent ofrespondents in other Asian countries, including China,Hong Kong, India and Korea, said their companiesneeded to do more to help them balance their workand life demands.15Technology can help by aiding flexibility. But it isimportant not to see it as the complete answer.A survey by Virgin Media Business found that 54per cent of the UK’s mobile workers thought thatblanket connectivity would shorten their workingday significantly but didn’t think it would improvetheir work:life balance.16Only 10 per cent thoughtthat working fewer hours would improve how theyseparated work and private lives.4 OECD Better Life Index2012: Work Life Balance5 ibid.6 The European Foundationfor the Improvement of Livingand Working Conditions:Fifth European WorkingConditions Survey, 20107 OECD Better Life Index2012: Work Life Balance indetail by country8 ibid.9 The University of SouthAustralia, Balance Still a BigSqueeze for Aussie Workers,24th September 201210 OECD Better Life Index2012: Work Life Balance indetail by country11 The Huffington Post,Brazil’s Email Overtime:New Law Counts CheckingSmartphones After Hours AsWork, 1st December 201212 OECD Better Life Index2012: Work Life Balance indetail by country13 Ibid.14 Business Destinations,The threat of Karoshi,27th April 201215 Wall Street Journal Blogs,Work Life balance achallenge for both gendersin Asia, 17th May 201216 Virgin Media Business, Allwork and no play doesn’tkeep the stress away,13th September 2012
  6. 6. 5Nevertheless, there is evidence that manyprofessionals feel that some balance can beachieved. A report by management consultancyAccenture published in early 2013 found that morethan two-thirds of respondents felt they could haveit all.17However, half felt they could not have it all thetime, with 52 per cent globally saying they had turneddown jobs due to concerns about the impact ontheir work:life balance. In South Africa the proportionturning down jobs was 67 per cent.18As the European Foundation for the Improvementof Living and Working Conditions says: “Win–winarrangements should be promoted. Workingconditions likely to be associated with higherwell-being of workers are also associated with highmotivation, commitment, and sustainable work.”19It adds: “Current employment policy priorities to raiseemployment levels, prolong working life, increasethe participation of women, and increase flexibilityand productivity depend for their success not just onchanges in the external labour market but also on thesuccessful management of life at work and at home,by all parties concerned, as well as on appropriatesocial support.”The indexIn order to provide business leaders and policymakers with an up-to-the-minute barometer ofworker and manager satisfaction with their work:lifebalance and measure real improvement, the RegusWork:life Balance Index analysed the opinions ofmore than 26,000 business managers and businessowners from over 90 countries. In addition toenquiring about whether they felt that improvementshad been made to their work:life balance in the pastyear, the report analysed their views on factors andbehaviours that typically affect work:life harmony.These included satisfaction with the amount of timespent at home or with their families, working hours,time spent at work, job enjoyment and sense ofachievement and whether additional duties taken onduring the downturn had finally been reassigned tonew members of staff.Shifting balanceAfter signalling a rise over the two years since2010, the Regus Work:life Balance Index rate ofimprovement has slowed slightly in the past year.This might seem surprising in view of the fact thatit is now half a decade since the financial crisis andsome countries are starting to see something of arecovery. However, these are still very challengingtimes for many businesses and, as a result, manyemployees will still be feeling under a lot of pressureand, rather than believing that balance is returningto their lives, think their time at work is as stressfulas ever. A possible explanation why the UK andGermany continue to languish towards the bottomof the rankings comes in a 2011 report by Avaya,which found that 81 per cent of UK and GermanSME decision makers blamed demanding workcommitments for struggles in their private lives.20Eighty-nine per cent reported that they had sufferedfrom stress or ill health, while 37 per cent said thattheir relationships had experienced strife, or they hadbeen separated or divorced. Thirty-five per cent hadhad to miss holidays due to work commitments.17 Accenture: Defining Success2013 Global ResearchResults, 8th March 201318 Business Day, Employees‘prefer work, life balance tomore pay’, 5th March 201319 Eurofound, Fifth EuropeanWorking Conditions Survey,201220 RealWire, The Trouble andStrife of Working Life: Avayaresearch reveals the hiddendangers of overworking,30th August 201121 Wall Street Journal Blogs,Work Life balance achallenge for both gendersin Asia, 17th May 201222 Financial Times, China’syoung warm to the west’swork:life balance, 6thMarch 2012MexicoFranceIndiaBrazilChinaSouth AfricaCanadaGlobal AverageNetherlandsUSAAustraliaUKJapanBelgiumGermany0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160The Regus Work:life Balance Index 2013Figure 1
  7. 7. 6By contrast, the BRICS countries continue to leadthe field, as Figure 1 indicates, even though they allsaw their individual index scores slip to some extent.Some of this continued strength could be down toculture since family life plays such a large role in manyof these countries. A quarter of respondents to a pan-Asian survey said their focus was split between workand life, with 15 per cent saying it was the family.21Indian respondents showed the greatest support forthe balanced approach. Even in China, where strivinghas been a way of life since the country began toopen up its economy, there has reportedly begun tobe a move away from such workaholic ways towardsa more balanced approach.22As Figure 2 shows, Australia, as a result of asignificant slip in its score, has fallen below average.Although surprising for those who think of Australiansas laid-back citizens enjoying an enviable outdoorlife, this development is hardly at odds with surveys.A recent report found that a third of both men andwomen felt they had more work than one personcould do, while the proportion of full-time workingwomen claiming to be dissatisfied with their work:lifebalance nearly doubled between 2008 and 2012.23Interestingly, it has been replaced by Canada, whichsaw a strong improvement last year.The size of Australia’s fall was matched by China,which nevertheless managed to retain its positiontowards the top of the table of countries analysed –like Brazil, which dropped from second place last yearto third this year on the back of a 14-point reductionin its score. It is possible that these countries couldbe suffering from rising expectations as theireconomies – and hence the aspirations of theirworkforces – develop.A somewhat smaller drop in its individual score wasenough to send France to the bottom of the table ofcountries analysed in place of its old rival, Germany.This, again, might seem surprising, but France isundergoing a lot of change at the moment and it ispossible that French workers are coming to termswith the new world order. French workers workmarginally longer hours than those in Germany andthe UK and – while they receive extensive holidays –often work in situations of high stress and in constantfear of losing their jobs.2421 Wall Street Journal Blogs,Work Life balance achallenge for both gendersin Asia, 17th May 201222 Financial Times, China’syoung warm to the west’swork:life balance, 6thMarch 201223 The University of SouthAustralia, Work:life BalanceStill a Big Squeeze for AussieWorkers, 24th September201224 The Guardian, FrenchStereotypes: They do notwork that hard, 25th March2011The Regus Work:life Balance Index 2012-2013Figure 22013 Index 2012 Index DifferenceAustralia 116 129 -13Belgium 103 104 -1Brazil 137 151 -14Canada 122 113 9China 136 149 -13France 100 109 -9Germany 101 95 6Global Average 120 124 -4India 138 139 -1Japan 106 105 1Mexico 149 153 -4Netherlands 118 120 -2South Africa 129 135 -6UK 109 104 5USA 117 123 -6
  8. 8. 7Battle of the generationsThis year’s Index also considers the differing attitudesof members of two distinct workplace groups – theBaby Boomers (those born between 1945 and 1964)and Generations X (born 1965-80) and Y (bornafter 1980).Overall, as Figure 3 shows, Generations X & Yenjoyed a better Work:life Balance Index score (123)than the Baby Boomers (117). However, there weresome national variations. Notably, with the exceptionof Mexico, Baby Boomers outscored the youngergenerations in the top four ranked countries analysed;the only other nations where this was the case wereGermany and Belgium.Evidence suggests that Baby Boomers are fallingbehind in the work:life balance area because of thevarious conflicts in their own lives. Traditionally, theyhave strongly identified themselves with their workand – in many cases – with their place of work.25Asa result, they have worked hard and set standardsfor others to follow without thinking too much ofthe sacrifices they have made. Increasingly, though,they are finding that – just as they are starting to seetheir own health deteriorate - they are having to carefor ageing relatives at the same time as continuingto look after children who may need more supportfor longer than earlier generations because theeconomic situation is making it harder for them toestablish their own careers.26Because of their ownhigh standards,27they know that they are not givingas much attention to work as they should – especiallysince many will be senior executives on account oftheir experience – and, as a result, they are feelingunder stress.Enabling such workers to remain working – as manywill wish to because of their commitment to theirwork – while also enabling them to deal with the otherresponsibilities they face, is a tough challenge, so it isnot surprising that many businesses are findingit hard.The dilemma confronting the Baby Boomers, who areseen as so fortunate in many respects by subsequentgenerations, is also illustrated by Figure 4.25 My PA Baby Boomers Striving For Work-Life Balance, 30th January 2012; HR Hero, Boomers (and their employers) face work/life challenges,17th April 2012; American Institute of CPAs, What Is This Work/Life Balance Everyone Keeps Talking About?, 18th July 201126 The Sandwich Generation, Kathy Quan27 Reducing Employee Stress – Practice Consideration-Oriented Leadership and Let Them, Debra Lopez, Ph.D.; Mark T. Green, Ph.D.,Meghan Carmody-Bubb, Ph.D.; Diana Garza-Ortiz, Ph.D.; Our Lady of the Lake University, Leadership Review Vol. 11 Spring 2011MexicoFranceBrazilSouth AfricaGlobal AverageNetherlandsUKBelgium0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160IndiaChinaCanadaUSAAustraliaJapanGermanyWork:life Balance Index for Generations X and Yand Baby BoomersFigure 3South AfricaUKIndiaBelgiumCanadaAustraliaGermanyJapan50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%MexicoBrazilGlobal AverageNetherlandsUSAChinaFranceGenerations X and Y and Baby Boomers: who feels theyachieve more at work?Figure 4  Baby Boomers  GenerationsX and Y  Baby Boomers  GenerationsX and Y
  9. 9. 8Traditionally, Baby Boomers would have been proudof working hard and of being effective and productiveemployees. Now, they have their doubts. And theyoung Generations X and Y – who have many fewerresponsibilities and less loyalty to their employers– are claiming to be able to achieve more at work,perhaps also because they have been more ready totake up and demand flexible working options.Bosses tip the scalesBusiness owners are feeling the glow of havingweathered the downturn and are feeling morepositive than employees (Figures 5 and 6). As recentRegus research highlighted, they are expectinggrowth and translating their bullishness into intentionsto hire.28Only in Belgium do business owners fareworse than non-owners when it comes to work:lifebalance and enjoying their work. This appearsto debunk the myth that businesses owners areworkaholics incapable of enjoying themselves. But itcould also be an illustration of the long-held view thatstress - a key element in measuring work:life balanceand enjoyment of work - is associated less with hardwork than with lack of control. In other words, anemployee who is unable to make changes to theirworking habits is likely to be more stressed than abusiness owner who can decide when and where towork, while enjoying the thrill of running an enterprisewith all the risks and rewards involved.A further explanation could be that business ownersare relieved to have survived the years since thefinancial crisis and perhaps are starting to enjoy thechallenge of finding new ways of developing theirbusinesses. In short, their view of the future may beless gloomy than that of their employees.IndiaSouth AfricaCanadaJapanUSAGermanyBelgium0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160ChinaBrazilNetherlandsGlobal AverageAustraliaUKFranceWork:life Balance Index for business owners and non-ownersFigure 5IndiaUKBrazilChinaFranceGlobal AverageAustraliaBelgium40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%MexicoSouth AfricaNetherlandsCanadaJapanUSAGermanyBusiness owners and non-owners: who enjoys work more?Figure 628 Just the Job, Regus Business Confidence Index, April 2013  Non businessowners  Businessowners  Non businessowners  Businessowners
  10. 10. 9Upsetting the balanceWorkers in general report being worn down by havingto do more work as a result of staff cutbacks in thedownturn. Although the numbers reporting this (seeFigure 7) are on the whole slightly lower than lastyear, they are still significant enough to have an effecton employees’ sense of wellbeing. Indeed, in somecountries – notably Japan and France – workers arefeeling even more frustrated.The extent to which workers are feeling overstretchedis even more graphically illustrated by Figure 8.Employees throughout the world – but particularly inJapan and Australia – say they are spending moretime away from home on work-related matters. Thiswould inevitably lead to a conflict with family life,especially for those with responsibilities beyond theimmediate family unit.Commuting, particularly in big cities, is one of thebiggest factors in work:life balance. It is often theactivity workers most look forward to not having to dowhen they retire or work from home. It is tiring evenwhen everything runs smoothly; when it doesn’t – asis often the case with creaking transport systems – itcan lead to stress and, of course, a great loss ofproductivity. Trying to reduce time spent commutingis one of the key drivers for organisations introducingflexible working.BrazilIndiaJapanUKGlobal AverageMexicoChinaNetherlandsBelgiumSouth AfricaUSAAustraliaFranceCanadaGermany30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%I have taken on additional duties during the slowdown, whichhave not been picked up by a new employeeFigure 7JapanChinaBelgiumGermanySouth AfricaAustraliaUKMexicoNetherlandsIndiaFranceGlobal AverageUSACanadaBrazil0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 60%50%I spend more time away from homeFigure 8  2013  2012  2013  2012
  11. 11. 10And yet a little under half of respondents believethat there is continued and consistent improvementin this area. With all attention focused on survival,many companies will claim that they cannot applythe energy to it; others will argue that it is notpractical for them. However, the lack of progressis clearly frustrating to many employees and this isan important measure that business owners couldintroduce to help employees improve their work:lifebalance too. With congestion in major cities – and notjust in western countries – becoming worse ratherthan better, the issue is likely to grow in importanceand will need to be addressed by organisationslooking to retain and motivate their best employees.The scale of the problem confronting businessesand individuals alike is illustrated by Figure 10. TheWork:life Balance Index has only risen in the past yearin large companies. The reversal from last year, whenthe Index was significantly higher in small companiesthan in larger counterparts, is perhaps a sign thatonly the larger businesses have the resilience todeal with an issue so important to employees at thesame time as handling the many other crises andchallenges caused by the prolonged tough economicenvironment.BrazilFranceIndiaMexicoNetherlandsUSABelgiumAustraliaGlobal AverageCanadaSouth AfricaChinaUKJapanGermany0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%I feel companies are doing more to help reduce commutingFigure 9SmallMedium95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130LargeWork:life Balance Index 2012-2013 by Company SizeFigure 10  2013  2012
  12. 12. 11There is no doubt that these are challenging times.Businesses the world over – and not just in the highlyindustrialised western countries that bore the brunt ofthe financial crisis – are struggling to build sustainablegrowth and profitability. So it is natural that theyshould focus on ensuring their survival and looking foropportunities to help secure their futures.But they only stand a chance of achieving this if theyhave the very best people. Repeated research hasshown that in all sorts of industries it is people whomake the difference between success and failure.Despite the tough circumstances, employees –younger ones, in particular – do not feel they have toremain loyal to an employer. They will go whereverthey think will further their careers and increasinglywherever will enable them to work in the way thatthey want, allowing them to juggle their variousinterests and responsibilities. The financial crisis mayhave changed perceptions of employment a little, but– to the surprise of many – it has not changed all thatmuch. Well-qualified people still think they can makedemands of their employers.Increasingly, those demands are about flexibility.Workers want the flexibility to work when they wantand how they want. Rather than compromising, theywant to have it all. Some businesses will see thisas a threat. But by being flexible themselves, smartemployers will be able to attract the best workers andsee them become even better through being happierand better motivated. What is more, by movingaway from the idea that they need to have their staffworking in the same ways and same places, they willsee productivity gains and also be able to cut theirfixed costs. It is a situation in which everybody wins –except those who insist on resisting flexibility.Conclusion
  13. 13. 12Country highlightsAustraliaAustralia has seen a sharp fall in its Work:lifeBalance Index score – equal second largest –taking it back below the global average after amarked improvement in 2012.BelgiumBelgium’s business owners are among the lowestof the Work:life Balance Index with 103 points.BrazilBrazilian workers – like last year – were the mostlikely to claim they were overworked. More than70% said they had picked up additional duties inthe slowdown that had not yet been taken on bynew employees.CanadaCanadian workers saw the biggest rise in theirWork:life Balance Index score; the country’s 122taking it just above the global average.ChinaAmong countries analysed, 81% of Chinesebusiness owners felt they achieved more at workthan last year.FranceFrench workers claim the worst Work:life Balance,with an Index score of just 100, down nine pointson a year ago.GermanyGerman workers’ improvement rate grew on lastyear. The country’s Work:life Balance Index scoreof 101 was six points higher than last year’s andenough to nudge it above France.IndiaIndian business owners were the most likely toreport that they were enjoying work more than lastyear (88%).JapanJapanese workers have moved ahead of theirChinese counterparts in claiming they spend moretime away from home.MexicoAmong countries analysed, Mexico topped theWork:life Balance Index for the second yearrunning, with 149 points.The NetherlandsThe Netherlands is the top European countryanalysed in terms of workers feeling companiesare making continued and consistent improvementto help reduce commuting.South AfricaFully 94% of South Africa’s Generations X and Yclaim they are achieving more at work.UKThe UK was one of only four countries to see arise in the Work:life Balance Index, but is still belowthe global average.USADespite a sharp drop in its Work:life Balance Indexscore this year, the USA is still close to the globalaverage.
  14. 14. 13MethodologyOver 26,000 businessrespondents from over90 countries wereinterviewed duringJanuary 2013.The Regus Work:life Balance Index calibrates anumber of different factors to produce an indexvalue that reflects overall levels of personal-worklife harmony.Not only are opinions about enjoyment andsense of achievement measured, but actualworking behaviours are also taken into account.Taking over additional duties, working hours,commute length and actual time spent away frompersonal pursuits are all ‘hard’ factors consideredalongside individual perceptions in this model,which uniquely balances opinion with realworking practice.= 500The Regus Work:life Balance Index calibrates anumber of different factors to produce an indexvalue that reflects overall levels of personal-worklife harmony.
  15. 15. 14About RegusRegus is the world’s largest provider of flexibleworkplaces, with products and services rangingfrom fully equipped offices to professionalmeeting rooms, business lounges and theworld’s largest network of video communicationstudios. Regus enables people to work theirway, whether it’s from home, on the road orfrom an office. Customers such as Google,GlaxoSmithKline, and Nokia join hundredsof thousands of growing small and mediumbusinesses that benefit from outsourcing theiroffice and workplace needs to Regus, allowingthem to focus on their core activities.Over 1,300,000 customers a day benefit fromRegus facilities spread across a global footprintof 1,500 locations in 600 cities and 99 countries,which allow individuals and companies to workwherever, however and whenever they wantto. Regus was founded in Brussels, Belgium in1989, is headquartered in Luxembourg and listedon the London Stock Exchange.For more information please visit:www.regus.com
  16. 16. Copyright © 2013. Regus Plc. All rights reserved.Whilst every effort has been taken to verify the accuracy of this information,Regus cannot accept any responsibility or liability for reliance by any person onthis report or any of the information, opinions or conclusions set out in this report.

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