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REFLESS Project - MA Linguistics Programme Information

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TEMPUS project "Reforming Foreign Language Studies in Serbia", Working visit to University of Southampton, MA Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, MA English Language Teaching, MA Applied …

TEMPUS project "Reforming Foreign Language Studies in Serbia", Working visit to University of Southampton, MA Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching, MA English Language Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics Research Methodology

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  • 1. MA Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching MA English Language Teaching MA Applied Linguistics Research MethodologyIPhD Applied Linguistics/ English Language Teaching
  • 2. 1. General overview of the programmesThe four postgraduate programmes described in this Handbook are inter-connected. The MAin Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT) and MA English LanguageTeaching (MAELT) programmes have two major aims: to provide a general postgraduateeducation in applied linguistics/ language teaching which is both rigorous and broadly based;and to provide continuing development for language professionals, enhancing yourprofessional knowledge and skills and enlarging your employment opportunities in language-related fields. The MA Applied Linguistics Research Methodology (MAALRM) offersresearch training in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and language acquisition. TheIntegrated PhD in Applied Linguistics/ English Language Teaching (IPhD) offers anintegrated programme of research training plus a research thesis.The MAALLT programme has been running successfully since 1992. ‘Applied Linguistics’can be defined as the empirical and theoretical study of real-world problems in whichlanguage is a central issue. It is often associated with the teaching of foreign languages andespecially English as a Foreign Language, and we have welcomed many foreign languageeducators onto the programme. However our interpretation of applied linguistics is a broadone, and this programme is suitable for students from varied backgrounds who wish todevelop language-related knowledge and skills for a wide variety of career goals.The MAELT programme ran for the first time in 2001–02. Sharing some modules with theestablished MAALLT programme, this programme provides a more focused track for Englishlanguage professionals who wish to develop advanced vocational skills in English languagecurriculum, pedagogy and assessment.The MAALRM programme ran for the first time in 2004–05. It provides a formal trainingroute in applied linguistics for prospective researchers and is an ideal first step towardsdoctoral study.The IPhD programme started in 2008–09. This four year programme provides a combinationof formal training in research methods plus professional study, as the foundation forindependent research and completion of a doctoral thesis.All four programmes are associated with the Centre for Applied Language Research, based inthe Modern Languages section of the Faculty of Humanities. Modern Languages atSouthampton was ranked in the top two UK universities for European Studies in the 2008Research Assessment Exercise, an indication that our research is of international, cuttingedge quality. At the same time, the staff team are involved in the direct teaching of modernlanguages and EFL, linguistics, initial and in-service teacher education, and research anddevelopmental work in applied linguistics and language learning, as well as cultural, mediaand literary studies. Their widely ranging interests mean that we are able to offer advancedteaching in subjects ranging from linguistic description and discourse analysis to languagepolicy and planning, language and nationalism, and literacy education. This blend oftheoretical expertise and ongoing practical experience is one of the distinguishing features ofour programmes.Our postgraduate students are typically returning to study with some well developedacademic interests and professional experience, and have a clear view of what they expect togain from their chosen postgraduate programme. You will be encouraged to pursue your1
  • 3. personal interests especially in the choice of option modules, your coursework, and yourdissertation. You will develop your presentation skills (oral and written), your informationtechnology skills, and your ability to handle numerical data. A special strength is theopportunity to develop your research skills, working with staff who are themselves activeresearchers.2. Overview of full time MA study routeAll three MA programmes normally comprise one year of full time study. The taughtcomponent, occupies the University’s normal teaching year (2 semesters from October toMay), and consists of a number of core modules, plus further options. There are lectures,seminars and workshops, during all of which you will be encouraged to participate actively;all participants are expected to reflect on and present language-related problems and solutionsfrom their own experience, and to lead workshop sessions. Assessment of individual modulesis by coursework, with advice and support from module tutors on choice of topic, writing andpresentation.You will be expected to submit all MA coursework by the deadlines set for the individualmodules. If your coursework is satisfactory you will then proceed with the dissertation, to becompleted by the last working day of September. The dissertation offers the chance to buildon what you have learned during the year, and develop an individual area of interest, withguidance from a personal supervisor.3. Overview of part time MA study routeThe MA programmes are also available part time, for professionals living and working in theSouthampton region. As a part timer you will complete the same programme of study as fulltimers, and attend the same daytime classes. However, your programme extends over 24months, so that you can complete the required number of study modules over four semestersrather than two. There is considerable flexibility over the rate and sequencing with whichmodules can be taken, though part timers are advised to concentrate on core modules duringYear 1, and on options during Year 2.The taught element of the part time programme is complete by the end of May in the secondyear of study. Provided the portfolio is satisfactory, part time students will submit theirdissertation by the last working day of September in their second year of study.4. Overview of IPhD study routeThe IPhD is a full time programme normally lasting for four years. During the first year (2semesters), you complete much of the taught component, alongside full time MA students,and then prepare a substantial research proposal. In Years 2–4 you will concentrate mainly onyour research thesis, with the guidance of a supervisory team, and complete further minorcoursework requirements ef 2
  • 4. Fuller details of all these aspects of the programmes are given in separate sections of thisHandbook, and /or in the Faculty of Humanities Postgraduate Studies handbook. Overall, theprogrammes are governed by the University’s regulations as these appear in the University ofSouthampton Calendar. (See www.calendar.soton.ac.uk for details.)5. MA Applied Linguistics for Language TeachingProgramme aimsThis programme aims to provide advanced training in applied linguistics/ language ineducation, including an element of research training, to graduates with professional interestsin language (typically but not exclusively language teachers). We aim to provide this trainingin an integrated manner, both to professionals operating in the UK and to those operatinginternationally, typically in an EFL context.Intended learning outcomesHaving successfully completed the programme, you will be able to demonstrate knowledgeand understanding of: A1 the principles underlying the analysis and description of language; A2 current theories of language learning, language in use, and language education; A3 a comparative perspective on language education policy and practice; A4 how to challenge professional practice, and undertake improvement-oriented enquiry and innovation; A5 how to undertake small-scale classroom research.You will be able to operate with the following subject-specific skills: B1 recognise the significance of different epistemological positions in applied linguistics, and their relationship with theory construction, research design, and the selection of analytical techniques; B2 make use of academic, professional, and public perspectives on language to explore educational policy and practice; B3 formulate researchable problems in language classrooms, and choose among alternative approaches to classroom research; B4 apply analytical procedures to English and other language data; B5 describe the roles of language in social behaviour and compare different approaches to describing language in social interaction; B6 describe current models of language acquisition and learning, and recognise the main distinguishing features of differing theoretical approaches; B7 assess the implications of theoretical and practical developments in applied linguistics for the education professions.3
  • 5. You will be able to operate with the following transferable skills: C1 communicate applied linguistic and educational work in varied written formats; C2 communicate your response to applied linguistic and educational work orally, in discussion and in formal presentations; C3 identify, select and draw upon relevant resources, printed and electronic; C4 develop and maintain a personal bibliography; C5 use information technology appropriately to support and present your research; C6 demonstrate interpersonal skills whilst working with others in the investigation of problems, and in the presentation of arguments and evidence; C7 take appropriate ethical issues into account in linguistic and educational work.Structure and content of the programmeThe MAALLT programme comprises eight taught modules (four core, four options, each 15credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits)The programme shares several modules with the other two MAs; for summary information onall modules see Appendix 1. All 15-credit modules are semester-length, with two class hoursper week. Some modules (at present LING6001, LING6004, LING6005, LING6013) haveadditional timetabled workshops.Semester 1 Core Modules LING6001 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 1 LING6004 Description of Language LING6005 Second Language Learning* Option Modules LING6007 Assessment of Language Proficiency LING6011 Writing and Written Language LING6022 Principles of Communicative Language Teaching LING6014 English as a World LanguageSemester 2 Core Modules LING6006 Language in Society* LING6017 Research Skills (Dissertation) Option Modules LING6002 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 2 LING6008 Autonomy and Individualisation in Language Learning LING6009 Discourse Analysis LING6010 Language Teacher Education LING6013 Current Issues in Language Teaching Methodology LING6028 Intercultural Communication* You must take at least one of these two modules as a core module 4
  • 6. Dissertation LING6016 DissertationYou will be asked at registration to enroll formally for your chosen eight 15-credit modules,as well as for the 60-credit ‘dissertation module’ LING6016. These credit-bearing elementsare supplemented with the following: • Regular Course meetings • Introduction to study resources (library, IT resources etc) and study skills sessions • Visiting speaker programmes (Centre for Applied Language Research/ Centre for Transnational Studies: normally one event per week during semester time)6. MA English Language TeachingProgramme aimsThe MAELT is a post-experience programme which provides teachers of English as a foreignlanguage from the UK and overseas with the opportunity to reflect on their professionalexperience, develop a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of English languageteaching, and gain the skills and competences required for leadership roles in ELT.Intended learning outcomesHaving successfully completed the programme, you will be able to demonstrate knowledgeand understanding of: A1 the analysis and description of language; A2 the relationship between the language curriculum and language pedagogy; A3 the principles of current language teaching practice, and the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; A4 how to challenge current professional practice, and undertake improvement- oriented enquiry and innovation;You will be able to operate with the following subject-specific skills: B1 comment critically on current approaches to curriculum design, pedagogy and assessment in the ELT field; B2 make use of the relationship between academic, professional, public and user conceptions of language to clarify educational policy and practice; B3 apply analytical procedures to English and other language data; B4 design and evaluate language learning/ teaching programmes and materials, using information technology where appropriate; B5 assess the implications of theoretical and practical developments in English language teaching and applied linguistics for the teaching profession.5
  • 7. You will be able to operate with the following transferable skills: C1 communicate language teaching, applied linguistic and educational work in a variety of written formats; C2 communicate your response to applied linguistic and educational work orally, in discussion and in formal presentations; C3 identify and use a wide range of reference resources, printed and electronic; C4 develop and maintain a personal bibliography; C5 use information technology appropriately when presenting your work and in your teaching; C6 demonstrate interpersonal skills whilst working with others in the investigation of problems, and in the presentation of arguments and evidence.Structure and content of the programmeThe MAELT programme comprises eight taught modules (four core, four options, each 15credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits).The programme shares several modules with the other two MAs; for summary information onall modules see Appendix 1. All 15-credit modules are semester-length, with two class hoursper week. Some modules (at present LING6001, LING6004, LING6005, LING6013) haveadditional timetabled workshops.Semester 1 Core Modules LING6004 Description of Language LING6012 A Critical Appraisal of Language Teaching Methodologies Option Modules LING6001 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 1 LING6005 Second Language Learning LING6007 Assessment of Language Proficiency LING6011 Writing and Written Language LING6014 English as a World LanguageSemester 2 Core Modules LING6013 Current Issues in Language Teaching Methodology LING6017 Research Skills (Dissertation) Option Modules LING6002 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 2 LING6006 Language in Society LING6008 Autonomy and Individualisation in Language Learning LING6009 Discourse Analysis LING6010 Language Teacher Education LING6028 Intercultural Communication 6
  • 8. Dissertation LING6016 DissertationYou will be asked at registration to enroll formally for your chosen eight 15-credit modules,as well as for the 60-credit ‘dissertation module’ LING6016. These credit-bearing elementsare supplemented with the following: • Regular Course meetings • Introduction to study resources (library, IT resources etc) and study skills sessions • Visiting speaker programmes (Centre for Applied Language Research/ Centre for Transnational Studies: normally one event per week during semester time)7. MA Applied Linguistics Research MethodologyEducational Aims of the ProgrammeThe MAALRM programme aims to provide you with broad-based training in linguistics/applied linguistics research methods; to equip you with the knowledge and skills needed toundertake doctoral research in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and language acquisition;and to develop your analytical, research and personal skills relevant to a range of careers inapplied linguistics research. The programme combines general training in social science andeducational research methods, with specialist applied linguistics training.Intended learning outcomesHaving successfully completed the programme, you will be able to demonstrate knowledgeand understanding of: A1 Broad principles of research design, data collection and data analysis in the social sciences, as specified in ESRC Postgraduate Training Guidelines Section E; A2 The philosophy, epistemology and ethics of research in applied linguistics; A3 General principles and major traditions of research design, data collection and data analysis in applied linguistics; A4 Applied linguistics research techniques and skills, including qualitative, quantitative and computational methods; A5 Descriptive and inferential statistical techniques and the handling of multivariate data; A6 Standard descriptive terminology and concepts in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and/or language acquisition, plus in-depth knowledge of description, theory and research in at least one of these subfields.You will be able to operate with the following subject-specific skills: B1 Understand the significance of alternative epistemological positions in applied linguistics and the social sciences, and their relationship with theory construction, research design, and the selection of analytical techniques;7
  • 9. B2 Understand the relationship between academic, professional, public and user conceptions of language, and the ideological assumptions of linguistic research; B3 Understand and evaluate existing traditions of description, theory and research in at least one of applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and language acquisition; B4 Formulate researchable problems in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, and/or language acquisition, and choose among approaches to applied linguistic research; B5 Understand, evaluate and apply applied linguistics research methods and tools; B6 Manage research, including collecting and managing data and conducting and disseminating research in line with professional practice and research ethics; B7 Design, implement and evaluate an independent research investigation in applied linguistics; B8 Assess the practical implications of theoretical developments in linguistics and related disciplines.You will be able to operate with the following transferable skills: C1 communicate applied linguistics research in a variety of written formats; C2 communicate applied linguistics research orally, including giving independent formal presentations; C3 identify and use a wide range of research resources, printed and electronic; C4 develop and maintain a personal research bibliography; C5 use information technology appropriately to support and present your research; C6 demonstrate interpersonal skills whilst working with others in the investigation of problems, and in the presentation of arguments and evidence; C7 understand ethical and legal issues involved in applied linguistics research.Structure and content of the programmeThe MAALRM programme comprises eight taught modules (5 core, 3 options), each 15credits, plus a dissertation (60 credits).Semester 1 Core Modules LING6001 Research and Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 1 LING6004 Description of Language LING6005 Second Language Learning* Option Modules LING6005 Second Language Learning (if not taken as Core) EDUC6223 Small Group/ Classroom Interaction EDUC8003 Case Study Research LING6014 English as a World Language* You must take at least one of these two modules as a core module 8
  • 10. Semester 2 Core Modules LING6002 Research and Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 2 LING6006 Language in Society* EDUC6219 Quantitative Methods and Statistical Processes Option Modules LING6006 Language in Society (if not taken as Core) LING6009 Discourse Analysis EDUC6199 Philosophical Issues in Education Research EDUC6207 Action Research STAT6005 Statistical Data Analysis LING6028 Intercultural CommunicationDissertation (15,000–20,000 words.) LING6015 DissertationYou will be asked at registration to enroll formally for your chosen eight 15-credit modules,as well as for the 60-credit ‘dissertation module’ LING6016. These credit-bearing elementsare supplemented with the following: • Regular Course meetings • Introduction to study resources (library, IT resources etc) and study skills sessions • Visiting speaker programmes (Centre for Applied Language Research/ Centre for Transnational Studies: normally one event per week during semester time)The programme has been accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council as a fullresearch training programme in Linguistics, preliminary to doctoral study. UK/EU graduatesof the programme may be eligible to apply for ESRC doctoral studentships. (ESRC fundingarrangements for doctoral study are in transition and further information will be available in2011.)8. Integrated PhD in Applied Linguistics/ English Language TeachingEducational aimsThe aims of the programme are to: • Provide you with broad based training in applied linguistics research methods; • Equip you with the knowledge and skills needed to undertake doctoral research in applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, language acquisition and/or English language teaching (ELT); • Develop your analytical, research and personal skills relevant to a range of careers in applied linguistics/ ELT research and teaching;9
  • 11. • Support you to devise, implement and successfully complete a substantial research investigation (the PhD thesis), which will make an original contribution to knowledge in the field.The programme comprises a taught element, incorporating research skills and subject specificknowledge; professional and transferable skills development; and a research project leadingto submission of a PhD thesis.Programme StructureThis 4 year full time programme consists of a mix of taught modules, research seminars andworkshops, and research supervision. Through these activities you will earn a total of 120study credits at Masters level (Level M), and 420 study credits at Doctoral level (D level).The taught modules comprise both research methods and content modules, plus workshopsoffering further research and subject specialist training. The taught modules follow a coreplus options structure, and are drawn from a wide range of postgraduate modules in appliedlinguistics/ English language teaching offered in the Faculty of Humanities, and from theResearch Training Programme of the School of Education.You will register initially as an MPhil/ PhD student. Progression to Year 2 of the programmeis conditional on successful completion during Year 1 of M level study modules comprising120 credit points, and on formal submission of a satisfactory research proposal (5000 words:15 credit points at D level). Thereafter, progression to upgrade from MPhil to PhD dependson successful completion of further assessed modules and an Advanced Skills Portfolio(totalling 45 credit points at D level). This upgrading process to PhD registration willnormally take place at latest by the end of Year 3.Year 1 (M Level: 120 credit points; D Level: 15 credit points)In the first year you will study 8 M level modules each rated at 15 credit points as follows: Core Modules LING6001 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 1 LING6002 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 2 LING6004 Description of Language EDUC6219 Quantitative Methods & Statistical Processes And one of: LING6005 Language Learning OR LING6006 Language and Society OR LING6014 English as a World Language Option Modules (three, to be drawn from) LING6005 Language Learning (if not taken as core) LING6006 Language and Society (if not taken as core) LING6007 Assessment of Language Proficiency LING6009 Discourse Analysis LING6010 Language Teacher Education LING6011 Writing and Written Language LING6012 A critical appraisal of language teaching methodologies LING6013 Current Issues in Language Teaching methodology 10
  • 12. LING6014 English as a World Language (if not taken as core) LING6028 Intercultural Communication TRAN6006 Language, Discourse, Identity (20 credits) EDUC6199 Philosophical Issues in Educational Research STAT6005 Statistical Data Analysis EDUC6207 Action Research EDUC6213 Ethnographic Research EDUC8004 Case Study Research EDUC6209 Communicating and Disseminating Research.You will also complete an extended research proposal (5000 words) for formal submissionand assessment at the end of Year 1 (15 D level credits).Year 2 and Year 3 (D level: 45 credit points)To be admitted to Year 2, you will have submitted a satisfactory extended research proposalfor formal assessment (rated at 15 D level credits). Having finalised your proposal, duringYear 2 you can expect in addition to undertake substantial development of your literaturereview and theoretical framework, to formulate your research questions, to create yourfieldwork design and to undertake pilot fieldwork, where applicable.Two further taught modules relevant to your research project and to your wider professionalinterests and needs will also be taken in Years 2 and 3, selected from the list of optionmodules given above (total 30 credits). These modules will be complemented by furtherworkshops and seminars leading to formal assessment at D level through specially tailoredassignments in the form of short conference papers or articles for possible publication.Finally, the “Advanced Skills Portfolio” is also submitted for formal assessment at D level(15 credits) by the end of Year 3. The role of the Portfolio is to document the development ofyour transferable and generic skills. Following self-assessment of your skills developmentneeds using the Research Activities Record, you will work towards completion of thisPortfolio. To achieve this you will be expected to attend an appropriate selection of researchtraining activities offered by the Faculty of Humanities during Years 2 and 3, and to play anactive part in the activities of the Centre for Applied Language Research, including itsstudent discussion group and annual student conference. The Portfolio itself will comprisee.g. records of presentations given, of teamwork activities undertaken, of personaldevelopment activities such as CV writing or careers consultations, or examples of theapplication of bibliographic or IT skills, plus reflective evaluations of the activities described.Year 3 and Year 4 (Research Thesis: 360 Credit Points)During Years 3 and 4 the main focus of your Integrated PhD will be your individual researchproject. In Year 3 you can expect to finalise the design of your project, to carry out your mainfieldwork, and to begin data analysis. An important goal for this year is the formalassessment of your progress through the Upgrading procedure which results in transfer toPhD candidature.In Year 4 you will work throughout on completion of your PhD thesis with the support ofyour supervisory team. You will be expected to submit the completed thesis (75,000 words)at the end of Year 4 (or no later than September of the following year).11
  • 13. Throughout Years 3 and 4 you will be expected to continue your participation in the activitiesof the Centre for Applied Language Research, including regular presentation and discussionof your own ongoing research and that of others. An ongoing programme of workshops andseminars will be provided by the Faculty and the Discipline in which you will further developyour transferable skills, e.g. developing your professional career plan and vocationalapplications of your research. 12
  • 14. Appendix 1: Module Summaries(LING modules only – details of EDUC and STAT modules will be provided separately forMAALRM and IPhD students)LING6001 Research and Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 1Prof. Rosamond Mitchell & Dr William BakerIn the first part of this module, we explore some key concepts and ‘ways of knowing’ whichare central to taking a research perspective on language learning and language teaching: thenature of theory, data, ‘truth’, idealisation, modelling, falsification etc. In the second part ofthe module, we study rationales for language classroom research, and a range of researchapproaches which have been adopted for classroom research, including systematicobservation, ethnography, teaching experiments, and action research. Students also gainpractice in using a number of specific research techniques (e.g. observation, interview,questionnaire design), and in reading the research literature.Method of assessment: Interaction analysis project, 3,000 (60%) and research review, 1,000–1500 words (40%)LING6002 Research & Enquiry in Applied Linguistics 2Prof. Rosamond Mitchell and Dr William BakerThe aims of this module are to extend students’ practical experience in using a range ofresearch techniques and skills relevant for larger scale applied linguistics research and tocomplement the prerequisite module REAL1, so that together the modules provide a two partin-depth survey of applied linguistics research methods. The module covers a range oftechniques and skills including: a) the design and use of larger scale surveys, tests and formaltechniques for elicitation of linguistic data; b) the use of qualitative methods for ethnographicand sociolinguistic research, including interviewing, recording and transcription of linguisticdata, and the use of a software package such as NVIVO for analysis of qualitative data sets;and c) the use of computational methods including the use of linguistic corpora (e.g. BritishNational Corpus, local Southampton corpora and international CHILDES corpora of learnerlanguage) and appropriate analysis software (e.g. Wordsmith, ELAN, CHILDES suite).Method of assessment: Reports on research investigations (2, each 2000 words, 80%); oralpresentation (20%)LING6004 Description of LanguageDr Glyn Hicks and Prof. Jennifer JenkinsThe module explores selected approaches to linguistic description and analysis, providing anoverview of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Links are made with languageteaching and learning, and the adequacy and usefulness of pedagogical grammars areassessed. The main language of exemplification is English, but some reference is made toother languages, and you will have opportunities to apply some of the principles of linguisticdescription to other languages.
  • 15. Method of assessment: Phonetics assignment (30%), 3,000 word essay (60%), grammarexercises assignment (10%)LING6005 Second Language LearningProf. Rosamond Mitchell and Dr Sarah RuleThis module introduces the different theoretical approaches which have been adopted forstudying the acquisition of language, and examines and assesses current theories of first andsecond language acquisition in the light of empirical evidence. Particular attention is paid tothe following issues in second language acquisition: Similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition the acquisition of grammar and of vocabulary bilingual development the role played by Universal Grammar the role played by cognitive mechanisms the role played by social factors and individual differences the influence of the first language variability and incomplete success in second language learning.Method of assessment: one 4000 word essay or project (80%); oral presentation (20%).LING6006 Language in SocietyDr Jaine Beswick and Dr Richard VigersThe starting point for this course is the view that while it is possible to study linguistic forms(sounds, words, sentences etc.) in isolation, the functions and use of language and languagescan be analysed and understood only in relation to the social and political environment inwhich linguistic activity takes place. Indeed, the fundamental premise is that ‘language’ and‘society’ are not independent entities, but rather exist in a necessarily reciprocal relationship.The course will be divided into two parts. The first part is dealing with key ideas andconcepts of sociolinguistic theory, and individual seminars will explore a range of topicsfrom both micro- and macro-sociolinguistic perspectives. In this part of the course we will bediscussing the agenda of research on language in society and its historically shifting focus.The theme of the second part is language, power and ideology, and the emphasis here will beon critical approaches to the study of language use, especially in relation to educationalcontexts.Method of assessment: Book review, 1,000 words, (30%), essay, 3,500 words, (70%)LING6007 Assessment of Language ProficiencyChristopher Sinclair and Prof. Rosamond MitchellA range of key constructs in assessment theory and currently popular techniques in assessinglanguage proficiency are reviewed and critically discussed. The overall processes involved in
  • 16. designing and implementing assessment procedures which are valid, reliable and fit forpurpose are explored. An important component of the module is the design, trialling and/orreview of particular assessment instruments relevant to participants’ professional activities,and you will be expected to contribute actively to this dimension of the module in theworkshop sessions.Method of assessment: 4000–5000 word test design/ evaluation project.LING6008 Autonomy and Individualisation in Language LearningVicky WrightThis course explores the themes of learner autonomy, resourced-based and open and distancelearning and their practical outworking in an institutional context. You will be encouraged tothink through ways of facilitating learning and in particular to consider the role of a self-accessresources centre in the language learning process, including the place of technology. There willbe plenty of opportunity to observe and work with learners using the Centre for Language Study(CLS) Language Resources Centre. Apart from the theoretical base which underpins the conceptof learner autonomy, the topics covered, and their precise focus, will be selected in consultationwith the course participants and the final programme will be drawn up after the first meeting.Method of assessment: one 4–5000 word essay or portfolioLING6009 Discourse AnalysisDr Alasdair ArchibaldThis option provides an overview of the main contemporary currents in the diverse field ofdiscourse analysis. Topics to be covered include the role of grammar, vocabulary andinformation structure in discourse; the psychology of discourse processing and discoursecomprehension; distinctive characteristics of spoken and written discourse; genre analysis;and critical discourse analysis. Applications in language education will be discussed, and youwill gain extensive experience of the practical analysis of a variety of text types.Method of assessment: Textual analysis task (2000 words); essay (3000 words).LING6010 Language Teacher EducationDr Julia Hüttner and Dr Patricia RomeroParticipants will become familiar with the more experiential and reflective approaches toteacher education current in international ELT, and also with the competency basedapproaches which dominate teacher education in many mainstream school systems. Themajor components of language teacher education programmes will be reviewed, including:developing teachers’ knowledge about language; developing teachers’ pedagogic knowledgeand skills; the role of mentoring, field placements and teaching practice; the assessment oftrainee teachers’ skills.Method of assessment: Coursework portfolio (3 items, each 1,500 words)
  • 17. LING6011 Writing and Written LanguageDr Alasdair ArchibaldThe aims of this module are to: examine major issues concerning writing, written language,and literacy in a second language; provide a linguistic analysis of written text structure andexamine areas of theoretical concern in second language writing; provide an overview ofissues concerning writing, written language, and literacy which are of particular relevance toteachers and learners of a foreign language. The module is structured in four parts whichexamine process, product, context, and instruction of writing in a second language. The firstdeals with composing and the writer in relation to the text; the second deals with the textproduced, its structure and organisation; the third with the text and the writer in relation tosocial context; and the fourth with the teaching, assessment, and acquisition of writing in asecond language.Method of assessment: one 4–5000 word project.LING6012 A Critical Appraisal of Language Teaching MethodologiesDr Julia HüttnerAfter providing an overview of general learning theories, the core of this module will focus onthe methodologies of teaching foreign languages, with English being used as the most frequent,but not the only, example. Modern approaches and methods will be discussed in the light oftheir theoretical underpinnings, including their conceptualisations of language and languagelearning. A clear focus will be given to Communicative Language Teaching and itsdevelopments, including Task-Based-Language Teaching and Content and LanguageIntegrated Learning. The elements of planning a course, including discussion of curricularissues, will focus on syllabus types and their implementation. Assessment procedures will bediscussed in the light of more general issues of standardisation.Method of assessment: one 4,500 word project (90%). Participation in class (presentation,contributions to blackboard discussions, regular tasks) (10%).LING6013 Current Issues in Language Teaching MethodologyDr Julia HüttnerBuilding on existing knowledge of language teaching methodologies, the core of this modulewill focus on current issues in language teaching methodologies and so address morespecialised or advanced areas. Key points will address implementation and adaptation ofmethodologies in the light of a discussion on critical pedagogy. The large area of languageplanning in education will lead to a focus on multilingual education, addressing bothprogrammes that aim at multilingualism and the approaches towards a “didactics ofmultilingualism” A further key point will address specific learner groups, e.g. English forSpecific or Academic Purposes. Finally, the application of discourse and genre theories aswell as of corpus linguistics to language teaching will be explored.Method of assessment: Portfolio consisting of 4 written tasks (90%). Participation in class(presentation, contributions to blackboard discussions, regular tasks) (10%).
  • 18. LING6014 English as a World LanguageProf. Jennifer JenkinsThe aims of this module are to explore the rise of English to its current status as the world’sdominant global language, and to consider the implications for English languageprofessionals and for teaching/testing English, now that native varieties of English can nolonger be assumed to be the most intelligible and appropriate varieties of English world-wide.You will have the opportunity to study the following topics: the spread of English; theestablishing of English language standards; the nature of non-native and native varieties ofEnglish; English-based pidgin and creole languages; English as an international linguafranca; English language ideology and attitudes to non-native varieties of English; the role ofpower, exploitation and language rights; the future of English alongside other globallanguages.Method of assessment: one essay 4500 words maximum.LING6017 Research Skills (Dissertation)Dr Laura Dominguez and Dr Will BakerThe aims of this module are to further develop the research, study and time management skillsyou will need for a substantial independent research investigation (the MA dissertation);support you in formulating a suitable research topic for your dissertation, and deepening yourpersonal knowledge and skills in relevant fields; and to support you in developing anappropriate research plan and instrumentation.Method of assessment: 2000 word annotated bibliography (50%); dissertation proposal (40%);oral presentation (10%).LING6022 Principles of Communicative Language TeachingDr Julia HüttnerThis module will provide you with a theoretical framework for CLT together with examplesand practice in how these principles may be applied to language teaching in the classroom. Wewill first examine the broader context of approaches to language teaching, tracing the originsand development of the communicative approach. We will then focus on the learner, theclassroom environment and practical applications of a communicative approach to languageteaching.Method of assessment: one 2–2500 word practical project (50%) and one 2–2500 wordassignment (50%).LING6028 Intercultural CommunicationDr Will Baker, Dr Rugang LuThis module will combine a theoretical understanding of intercultural communication withreflections and evaluations of your own intercultural experiences and applications of this topedagogic settings. Topics covered will include: theories of communication, culture andlanguage; theories of intercultural communication; culture and identity; ‘native’ and ‘other’
  • 19. cultures and the role of generalisations and stereotypes; intercultural communication andlanguage teaching including intercultural communicative competence and cultural/interculturalawareness. You will have the opportunity to apply this knowledge and these skills to teachingcontexts of relevance to you and gain practical experience in analysing examples ofintercultural communication.Method of assessment: one 15-minute oral presentation (20%) and one 4000 wordassignment (80%).LING6015/6016 DissertationDr Alasdair Archibald, Dr Julia Hüttner, Prof. Rosamond Mitchell and individual supervisorsThe MA dissertation gives you the opportunity to undertake an extended piece ofindependent research, with guidance from a supervisor. You will develop a theoreticalframework and research design relating to your chosen topic, choose, apply and evaluate arange of relevant research procedures, make a small scale original contribution to appliedlinguistics and/or English language teaching, and prepare for professional activity in whichindependent research is a component.Method of assessment: 15–20,000 word dissertation.