RECUWATT Conference - Stephanie Thiel lecture
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

RECUWATT Conference - Stephanie Thiel lecture

on

  • 1,081 views

SECTION V: COMPLEMENTARITY OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY IN A WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ...

SECTION V: COMPLEMENTARITY OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY IN A WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
“TMB and incineration in a waste management system: experience in Germany” by Mr. Stephanie Thiel, VIVIS Consult, Germany

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,081
Views on SlideShare
1,081
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
79
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

RECUWATT Conference - Stephanie Thiel lecture RECUWATT Conference - Stephanie Thiel lecture Document Transcript

  • Mechanical‐Biological Treatment (MBT) and  incineration in a waste management system:  experience in Germany Dr.‐Ing. Stephanie Thiel Professor Dr. Dr. h. c. Karl J. Thomé‐Kozmiensky vivis Consult GmbH Dorfstraße 51 D ‐ 16816 Nietwerder Tel.: +49 3391 4545 0 Fax: +49 3391 4545 10 E‐Mail: tkverlag@vivis.deRECUWATT Conference – Recycling and Energy, 25th March 2011 Outline 1. Introduction 2. Incineration of residual waste 2.1. Status quo in Germany 2.2. Technology of waste incineration 2.3. Problems and subjects of optimisation 3. Mechanical‐biological treatment of residual waste 3.1. Status quo in Germany 3.2. Technology of mechanical‐biological waste treatment 3.3. Technical, economic and ecological problems  3.4. Output streams and mass balances 4. Conclusions and Summary 2
  • Waste Management System – simplified illustration for household and commercial waste – 3 Outline1. Introduction2. Incineration of residual waste 2.1. Status quo in Germany 2.2. Technology of waste incineration 2.3. Problems and subjects of optimisation3. Mechanical‐biological treatment of residual waste 3.1. Status quo in Germany 3.2. Technology of mechanical‐biological waste treatment 3.3. Technical, economic and ecological problems  3.4. Output streams and mass balances4. Conclusions and Summary 4
  • Thermal treatment of mixed municipal waste in Germany Number of plants and their capacity• 67 Waste incineration plants• 1 Pyrolysis plantTotal 68 plants about 19 million t/a 5 Grate furnace with a post‐combustion chamber 6
  • Example of a waste incineration plant 7 Reduction in emissions of pollutants from WIPsBasis of data: Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety, 2008 8
  • Problems posed by the incineration of waste  and subjects of optimisation • corrosion in the steam generatorCorrosion damage on a tube wall Weld‐cladding of a tube wall Superheater tubes with claddingSource: CheMin GmbH Source: Uhlig Rohrbogen GmbH Source: CheMin GmbH• fouling of the heating surfaces• reduction of nitrogen oxides – selective non catalytic reduction (SNCR)• availability• waste throughput• energy efficiency• economic efficiency 9 Outline 1. Introduction 2. Incineration of residual waste 2.1. Status quo in Germany 2.2. Technology of waste incineration 2.3. Problems and subjects of optimisation 3. Mechanical‐biological treatment of residual waste 3.1. Status quo in Germany 3.2. Technology of mechanical‐biological waste treatment 3.3. Technical, economic and ecological problems  3.4. Output streams and mass balances 4. Conclusions and Summary 10
  • Mechanical(‐biological) waste treatment plants  in Germany61 M(B)T plantsPlant throughputs:25,000 – 300,000 t/aTotal capacity:6.4 million t/a 11 Material Stream Separation 12
  • Process flowsheetMechanical Processing of the BMA Dresdenminimum basic equipment:• comminution• screening• magnetic separationfurther possible aggregates:• air classification• ballistic separation• eddy current separation• near‐infrared spectroscopy (NIR sorting)• x‐ray sensors• colour sensors in the range of visible light• hard material separation• long parts separation• manual sorting• thermal drying• pelletization 13Biological Treatment• intensive and secondary  rotting• biological drying• fermentation – and secondary rotting – and aeration of the digestate• percolation process 14
  • Flue Gas Purification • dust filter • biofilter • acid scrubber • Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) left:  acid scrubber right:  RTO 15 Problems posed by the  mechanical‐biological treatment of waste IMechanical processing• High level of wear, tear and energy requirement  with processing and conveying aggregates,  e.g. comminution, pelletization• Blockages and contamination,  e.g. during screening and ballistic separation• increased time and effort for cleaning, maintenance and repairs, thereby reduction of time availability and throughput• Personnel requirement often significantly underestimated 16
  • Problems posed by the  mechanical‐biological treatment of waste II Fermentation • At 5 plants operating with wet fermentation and aeration of the digestate in sludge activation tanks, partly serious operational errors occurred during the commissioning, including deflagration/fire and bursting of a fermentation reactor • strongly fluctuating Typical production of gas in the MBT Ha nnover plant – smoothed waveform production of biogas due to discontinuous substrate‐entry  • waste water:  possibility of high amount,  complex and very costly treatment is necessarySource: Vielhabe r, B.; Nülle, C. (2008), revised. 17 Problems posed by the  mechanical‐biological treatment of waste III Flue Gas Purification – Regenerative Thermal Oxidation (RTO) • blocking of the ceramic honeycomb structure through siloxanes in the flue gas   • dimensioning frequently too small and lacking redundancy  • corrosion in the casing of the RTO and the gas pipes • energy requirement frequently underestimated Landfill fraction • The landfill fractions from MBT have a higher organic proportion, and therefore  a higher biological activity than ash/slag from waste incineration plants Methane emissions (climate‐damaging)  increased mobilisation of pollutants such as heavy metals • It was not possible to comply with the assignment criteria specified for the  landfilling of ash/slag from waste incineration plants less strict criteria were defined for landfilling of secondary waste from MBT Corrosion  • e.g. buildings, ventilation system of the rotting system, RTO 18
  • CostsThe waste disposal costs with MBT plants are similar to  those with waste incineration plantsThey comprise the costs for• construction and operation of the MBT plant• combustion of solid recovered fuel (SRF) and further combustible fractions for waste incineration plants (WIP)• landfilling of the landfill fractions• transportsWaste disposal costs for municipal solid waste  in Germany: approximately 100 Euro per ton 19False reasoning:Reality: in every MBT plant solid recovered fuel solid recovered fuel is produced power stations intermediate storage 20
  • Comparison of the systems of MBT and WIP 21 Mass balance of M(B)T plants  throughout Germany  estimation, 11/2007 22
  • Outline 1. Introduction 2. Incineration of residual waste 2.1. Status quo in Germany 2.2. Technology of waste incineration 2.3. Problems and subjects of optimisation 3. Mechanical‐biological treatment of residual waste 3.1. Status quo in Germany 3.2. Technology of mechanical‐biological waste treatment 3.3. Technical, economic and ecological problems  3.4. Output streams and mass balances 4. Conclusions and Summary 23 Conclusions and Summary – Incineration • the most developed residual waste treatment process • ideal combination of waste treatment and energy supply  (electricity, process heat, district heating and/or remote cooling)• combined heat and power generation is pre‐condition for high energy efficiency• pollutant sink for harmful substances in waste• emissions of pollutants: dramatic fall in comparison with the period prior to 1990 – clear undercut of the limit values on annual average• problem of corrosion – solutions for reduction are disposable• availability, energy efficiency and economic efficiency are further  optimised in several plants 24
  • Conclusions and Summary – Mechanical‐biological treatment• MBTs are complex waste treatment plants with a wide ranging variety of technical configurations• various technical, economic and ecological problems, partly solved and partly still subject of optimisation• MBT cannot replace waste incineration  – MBT is only a pre‐treatment of waste prior to its incineration• incineration is simply delayed – more complex system  with more material streams and treatment steps• altogether in Germany almost 60 wt % of the waste input  of MBTs finally are incinerated• in Germany waste disposal costs with MBTs and WIPs are similar 25 Reserve‐Folien 26
  • ENERGY CONVERSION THROUGH WASTE  INCINERATION IN GERMANY Evaluation of 64 of 68 plants  for the thermal treatment of municipal waste 44 plants:  both electrical power as well as heat  (as district heat or steam)  Combined heat and power9 plants: electrical power only9 plants: Provision of steam to an external user (full) (generally to a power station or a combined heat and power plant)2 plants: district heat only CONTRIBUTION OF WASTE INCINERATION TO THE SUPPLY OF ENERGY19 million t of waste are incinerated in Germany: ~ 5 million MWh electricity ~ 15 million MWh district heat Energy efficiency Measures to increase energy efficiency – examples • combined heat and power generation • heat utilisation as process heat, district heating, remote cooling (examples: Wien, Kassel) • reduction of the flue gas temperature • reduction of the flue gas volume • elevation of the live steam temperature and pressure • reheating • preheating of secondary air • preheating of condensate 28
  • Energy efficiencyTechnical/scientific definition Attainable net efficiency net energy efficiency (depending on the individual basic conditions): • pure electricity generation: up to > 30 % • concurrent generation of electricity and district heating/process heat:  overall efficiency: 70‐80 % • pure generation of process heat: up to > 90 Political definition % gross energy efficiency assessed by the R1 formula – range of german WIPs 29 Mechanical‐Biological Stabilization 30
  • Mechanical‐Physical Stabilization 31Mechanical(‐Biological) Pre‐Treatment  prior to Incineration 32
  • 33Processes for the purification of waste water (simplified)Source: Schalk, P. (2003) 34
  • In case of a planned opening of the plants that are currently under  construction – Projects are not considered– End of 2011  presumably: 36 plants 4.81 million t/a 35 Mass balances of exemplary M(B)T plants with production of high‐quality SRF 36