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How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
How specific is SLI - slides
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How specific is SLI - slides

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Slides to accompany RALLI video "How specific is Specific Language Impairment"

Slides to accompany RALLI video "How specific is Specific Language Impairment"

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  • 1. How specific isSpecific Language Impairment?Dorothy V M Bishop
  • 2. Specific language impairment (SLI)• Identified when language development falls wellbehind that of other children of the same age• No obvious explanation. Typically exclude cases with:– Permanent hearing loss– Generally slow development in all areas– Language problems after brain damage– Medical syndromes– Classic autism– Physical abnormalities of mouth and tongue– Problems just with second language learning
  • 3. Other problems often occur with SLIDyslexiaSLIBishop, D. V. M., & Snowling, M. J. (2004). Developmental dyslexia and SpecificLanguage Impairment: Same or different? Psychological Bulletin, 130, 858-886.
  • 4. Other problems often occur with SLI -2SLIADHDTirosh, E., & Cohen, A. (1998). Language deficit with attention-deficit disorder: Aprevalent comorbidity. Journal of Child Neurology, 13, 493-497.
  • 5. Other problems often occur with SLI -3SLIHill, E. L. (2001). Non-specific nature of specific language impairment: a review of theliterature with regard to concomitant motor impairments. International Journal ofDevelopmental co-ordinationdisorder(“dyspraxia”)
  • 6. Other problems often occur with SLI - 4SLIBishop, D. V. M., & Norbury, C. F. (2002). Exploring the borderlands of autistic disorderand specific language impairment: A study using standardised diagnostic instruments.Autistic spectrumdisorderSee also our slidesharepresentation on Autismand SLI
  • 7. Putting it all together!Developmental co-ordinationdisorder(“dyspraxia”)DyslexiaSLIADHDAutistic spectrumdisorderBishop, D., & Rutter, M. (2008). Neurodevelopmental disorders: conceptual approaches.In M. Rutter, D. Bishop, D. Pine, S. Scott, J. Stevenson, E. Taylor & A. Thapar (Eds.),Rutters Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (pp. 32-41). Oxford: Blackwell.
  • 8. Boundaries between differentconditions are not clearcut
  • 9. Dyck, M. J., et al. (2011). The validity of psychiatric diagnoses: The case of specificdevelopmental disorders. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32(6), 2704-2713.608 children aged 3 – 14 years 449 Typically-developing 30 Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) 24 Mental retardation (MR = UK learning disability) 30 Receptive-expressive language disorder (SLI) 22 Developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD) 53 Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Assessments of IQ, language, motor, attention,social cognition, executive functionWestern Australian study
  • 10. TypicalAutismMRSLIDCDADHDDyck et al: Differences between childrencaptured by two dimensionsFunction 1N.B.No sharp boundariesbetween disorders.SLI overlap with otherconditions
  • 11. A consequence of the overlaps:Same child, different diagnosis• Speech and language therapist: SLI• Educational psychologist: Dyslexia• Psychiatrist: Autism spectrumdisorder (ASD)• Neurologist: Developmentalco-ordination disorder (DCD)• Paediatrician: ADHD
  • 12. Why are there overlaps between disorders?• Technical term for co-occurrence is comorbidity• One condition could increase the risk for the other:e.g. Child with language problems may be inattentive if theycan’t understand instructions• Another possibility: different conditions but with commoncause:e.g. Genetic factors may affect development of brainregions that are important for both motor and languagedevelopment• Disentangling the possibilities is complicated! Seereference list for more information
  • 13. For further readingsee reference list on:http://www.slideshare.net/RALLICampaign/how-specific-is-SLI

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