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  • Nog een kaart ertussen met waar we allemaal werken? Nu is overgang van risk naar lake N wel groot.
  • This is work from a WF assessment Companies are asking question about their supply chain like never before and here they want to know the impacts in places where they source. This is a first step to prioritising and setting out strategy for improving their water use and identifying risk.
    Roos 9,2 l/stuk
    Koffie 140 l/kop
    Appel 70 l/stuk
    Biefstuk 15.000 l/kg
    Katoenen shirt 2.700 l/stuk
  • The Lake Naivasha Basin is at the heart of Kenya’s floriculture industry accounting for more than 70% (€ 220 million) of the country’s cut flower exports. Kenya’s cut flower exports account for more than 40% of the EU retail market
    The Naivasha Basin generates 9% of Kenya’s total foreign exchange revenue.
    It’s estimated that 45% of the revenue generated by a typical cut flower farm is spent on production costs on the farm – implying that the contribution of the floriculture industry to Lake Naivasha’s local economy is approx €95 million
    It’s estimated that the flower industry in Naivasha employs approx 40,000 people directly and a further 400,000 jobs are created in the associated service and informal sector businesses
  • The Imarisha Lake Naivasha Management Board was created in 2011 by official gazette to manage the Lake Naivasha Catchment Restoration Programme. It is broadly representative of all stakeholder groups involved in use and management of the Lake and catchment, water and natural resources. Board members include representatives of local and national government, civil society/ community groups, land/ resource managers, private sector and business community (see details in SDAP: Imarisha Naivasha, 2012- annex 8 ). It has strong support from Government of Kenya (Office of the Prime Minister, with oversight by an Inter-Ministerial Technical Committee) and private sector (especially Naivasha flower growers, UK and other European flower retailers) and is in effect created as a PPP. The specific functions of Imarisha are to:
    Develop a programme (“Imarisha Naivasha Programme”) to coordinate the activities of various players engaged in the conservation of the lake and its catchment, and for that purpose to review and approve projects;
    Monitor compliance with the laws and regulations governing the environment of the lake and its catchment in collaboration with the relevant Ministries;
    Develop and enforce codes of conduct to be observed by the players in order to improve the environment and establish sustainability of the lake and its catchment in partnership with the relevant stakeholders;
    Develop, adapt and execute a Trust or other instrument to receive financial resources from within or outside Kenya to finance the implementation of programmes, for which the Board shall be fully accountable for proper and prudent management and for the loss of which it shall be liable;
    Collaborate with all the stakeholders, including research institutions and promote their active participation in the Imarisha Naivasha Programme within the lake and its catchment;
    Report on a quarterly basis to the Inter-Ministerial Technical Committee and seek guidance on policy and technical [issues] from the Committee.
    Perform any other tasks as requested by the Inter-Ministerial Technical Committee.
    Gazette Notice 5368 of 20th May, 2011

Transcript

  • 1. Water for All Shared risk and opportunity: PPPP Governance of water Bart Geenen – WWF Adopted by Joris van Oppenraaij (NWP) for Rain meeting 11 December 2013
  • 2. Consumers Choices
  • 3. Business Risks
  • 4. What are companies saying? ‘A survey of 350 companies found that 92% agree that a water crisis is looming and 70% believe that the risks of water scarcity are equal to those of carbon emissions.’ WSP Environment & Energy, September 2009
  • 5. What are companies doing?
  • 6. Context • 2nd largest freshwater lake Kenya • Economic hub in Kenya – – – – – – Floriculture heart (70% Kenyan export) 2-3% Kenyan GDP Leading foreign exchange earner (9%) 40% of EU retail market (50% NL) Geothermal existing and expanding Regional market • Rich Biodiversity • Employment (20.000 direct, 350,000 indirect) • 80% water quantity problems due to irrigation • 80% water quality problems due to poor practices upstream
  • 7. How did we get there? Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 7
  • 8. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 8
  • 9. 7 February 2014 - 9
  • 10. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 10
  • 11. 7 February 2014 - 11
  • 12. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 12
  • 13. 7 February 2014 - 13
  • 14. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 14
  • 15. Results • Groundwater abstraction permits survey • Freeze abstraction licensing • Groundwater protection zone • WRUAs got water management and fee collection mandate (empowerment) • (Simple) Water Allocation Plan adopted • Payment for Environmental Services (PES) • ... • More than considered realistic before 2009! • ... and it is the stakeholders collectively steering the process
  • 16. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable the problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 16
  • 17. Sense of urgency Convening power Shared problem, risk & vision Joint planning, joint action Quantifiable the problem Collective/good governance, communication and transparency Measurable results within reach Mainstreaming good practice, to economic interdependency Business case Celebrating success & communication 7 February 2014 - 17
  • 18. PPPP Governance Structure: Imarisha - PPPP body mandated by Government - representatives of local and national government, civil society/ community groups, land/ resource managers, private sector and business community - Sustainable Development Action Plan - Coordinate the activities of various players - Transparency and data sharing - Monitor compliance with the laws and regulations governing LN - Develop and enforce codes of conduct - Develop, adapt and execute a Trust (€ in/outside Kenya)
  • 19. Value chain  Place based interventions Certification international trade (eg flowers) Catchment –wide governance of water for sustainability Beyond certification Beyond IWRM
  • 20. IWRAP 1. Improved governance WRMA and WRUAs: NL RWA, WGC 2. Improved quantitative water resource management and monitoring: NL RWA, ITC, Deltares 3. Headwater protection (CFM): WWF 4. Prepare scaling PES in riparian farmland: WWF 5. Good stewardship in LNB floriculture through adoption of national standards and certification: KFC, IDH 6. Strengthened Imarisha Naivasha for execution of the SDAP: Imarisha 7. LN PPP Sustainable Development Fund (LNB-3PSDF): WWF (NL), ITC, Imarisha, NL & UK retail, IDH, GIZ
  • 21. Project  Partnership Governance? - PPPP on basis of added value: chain of barriers becomes chain of opportunities - Paradigm change: no pre-fixed projects - Demand-driven, Sensing, Probing & Scaling, Open ended - Changing partners: transition (private sector ~ business plan) - Funding & finance - Adaptive, Changing, Risk capital, Enabling - Become engaged - Long-term commitment / Collective action - FIETS sustainability and thus multi stakeholder