2000 mathematics paper a

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An interactive voting lesson designed for use with Qwizdom Classroom Response Systems

An interactive voting lesson designed for use with Qwizdom Classroom Response Systems

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  • 1. 2000 MATHS PAPER A
  • 2. Mathematics Paper 2000 A Input your name and press send. Next Page
  • 3. Mathematics Paper Q1a Next Page Each card on the left matches one on the right. A B C D Which box matches this one?
  • 4. Mathematics Paper Q1b Next Page Each card on the left matches one on the right. A B C D Which box matches this one?
  • 5. Mathematics Paper Q1c Next Page Each card on the left matches one on the right. A B C D Which box matches this one?
  • 6. Mathematics Paper Q1d Next Page Each card on the left matches one on the right. A B C D Which box matches this one?
  • 7. Mathematics Paper Q2a Next Page 150 + ? = 500
  • 8. Mathematics Paper Q2a Next Page 172 - ? = 60
  • 9. Mathematics Paper Q3 Next Page Here is a jigsaw with one piece missing . Which one of the pieces below fits the hole in the middle? Word FIle
  • 10. Mathematics Paper Q4a Next Page Where would each of these numbers go on the sorting diagram? A B C D 40? Position: A B C D
  • 11. Mathematics Paper Q4b Next Page Where would each of these numbers go on the sorting diagram? A B C D 8? Position: A B C D
  • 12. Mathematics Paper Q4c Next Page Answers Where would each of these numbers go on the sorting diagram? A B C D 15? Position: A B C D
  • 13. Mathematics Paper Q4c Next Page Answers Where would each of these numbers go on the sorting diagram? 15 40 8 15? Position: A B C D
  • 14. Mathematics Paper Q5 Next Page
            • 369 + 251 =
  • 15. Mathematics Paper Q6a Next Page Answer key A shop sells batteries in packs of four and packs of two. Simon and Nick want two batteries each. They buy a pack of four and share the cost equally. How much does each pay? {Answer in pence}
  • 16. Mathematics Paper Q6a Next Page A shop sells batteries in packs of four and packs of two. Simon and Nick want two batteries each. They buy a pack of four and share the cost equally. How much does each pay? {Answer in pence} (a) Award TWO marks for the correct answer of 74p OR £0.74 Up to 2m If the answer is incorrect, award ONE mark for evidence of appropriate working, eg 148 ¸ 2 = wrong answer Accept for TWO marks 74 OR 0.74 OR £0. 74p OR .74 OR £.74 OR £.74p Accept for ONE mark £74p OR 0.74p as evidence of appropriate working. Calculation must be performed for the award of ONE mark.
  • 17. Mathematics Paper Q6b Next Page Answer key A shop sells batteries in packs of four and packs of two. Mary buys 2 packs of two batteries. Hamid buys 1 pack of four . How much more does Mary pay than Hamid? {Answer in pence}
  • 18. Mathematics Paper Q6b Next Page A shop sells batteries in packs of four and packs of two. Mary buys 2 packs of two batteries. Hamid buys 1 pack of four . How much more does Mary pay than Hamid? {Answer in pence} (b) Award TWO marks for the correct answer of 22p OR £0.22 Up to 2m If the answer is incorrect, award ONE mark for evidence of appropriate working, eg 2 × 85 – 148 = wrong answer Accept for TWO marks 22 OR 0.22 OR £0.22 OR .22 OR £.22 OR £.22p Accept for ONE mark £22p OR 0.22p OR £22 as evidence of appropriate working. Calculation must be performed for the award of ONE mark.
  • 19. Mathematics Paper Q7a Next Page This table shows the numbers of children who went walking, sailing or climbing at an outdoor centre. How many children went sailing in May, June and July altogether?   May June July walking 25 80 75 sailing 15 42 50 climbing 18 27 23
  • 20. Mathematics Paper Q7b Next Page This table shows the numbers of children who went walking, sailing or climbing at an outdoor centre. How many more children went walking in June than climbing in June ?   May June July walking 25 80 75 sailing 15 42 50 climbing 18 27 23
  • 21. Mathematics Paper Q8a Next Page These are the temperatures in York and Rome on a day in winter. How may degrees colder is it in York than in Rome ?
  • 22. Mathematics Paper Q8b Next Page Answer Key These are the temperatures in York and Rome on a day in winter. On another day, the temperature in York is 4°C Rome is 7 degrees colder than York. What is the temperature in Rome ?
  • 23. Mathematics Paper Q8b Next Page These are the temperatures in York and Rome on a day in winter. B) On another day, the temperature in York is 4°C Rome is 7 degrees colder than York. What is the temperature in Rome ? A) How may degrees colder is it in York than in Rome ? (a) 5 (b) – 3 OR minus 3 Accept ‘3 degrees below zero’ or similar OR –3’ written on either thermometer. Do not accept ‘3–’ OR a mark on the thermometers such as a cross, unless the numerical answer is written. Negative Numbers ppt?
  • 24. Mathematics Paper Q9 Next Page Here are some shaded shapes on a grid. Which three shapes have reflective symmetry ?
  • 25. Mathematics Paper Q10a Next Page A camping shop sells tents , sleeping bags and backpacks . This chart shows how many of each they sold in June. Items sold in June The shop had 20 sleeping bags at the beginning of June . How many of these sleeping bags did the shop have left at the end of June ?
  • 26. Mathematics Paper Q10b Next Page A camping shop sells tents , sleeping bags and backpacks . This chart shows how many of each they sold in June. Items sold in June In July , the shop sold three times as many tents as in June. How many tents did the shop sell in July ?
  • 27. Mathematics Paper Q11 Next Page Which two numbers add together to make 0.12?
    • 0.1
    • 0.5
    • 0.05
    • 0.7
    • 0.07
    • 0.2
  • 28. Mathematics Paper Q12 Next Page Answer Key Leon and Sara each started with different numbers. Leon and Sara both get the same answer. What numbers could they have started with?
  • 29. Mathematics Paper Q12 Next Page Leon and Sara each started with different numbers. Leon and Sara both get the same answer. What numbers could they have started with?
    • Any two numbers such that Sara’s number is thirteen greater than Leon’s, eg
    • Leon 10 Sara 23
      • Accept decimals, fractions, negative numbers and zero.
  • 30. Mathematics Paper Q13 Next Page Calculate ¾ of 840
  • 31. Mathematics Paper Q14a Next Page Answers The spinner is divided into nine equal sections.
    • Which two different numbers on the spinner are equally likely to come up?
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • 32. Mathematics Paper Q14a Next Page The spinner is divided into nine equal sections.
    • Which two different numbers on the spinner are equally likely to come up?
    • 1 2 x 1 out of 9 = 2/9
    • 2 5 x 2 out of 9 = 5/9
    • 3 1 x 3 out of 9 = 1/9
    • 4 1 x 4 out of 9 = 1/9
  • 33. Mathematics Paper Q14b Next Page Answer Key The spinner is divided into nine equal sections. Meera says, ‘ 2 has a greater than even chance of coming up’. Explain why she is correct.
  • 34. Mathematics Paper Q14b Next Page The spinner is divided into nine equal sections. Meera says, ‘ 2 has a greater than even chance of coming up’. Explain why she is correct.
    • (b) An explanation which recognises that more than half of the spinner sections have 2 in them, eg
      • · ‘More than half are twos’;
      • · ‘There are five twos out of the nine’;
      • · ‘There are more twos than all the other numbers altogether’;
      • · ‘Because 2 has a probability of ‘.
    • Do not accept vague or arbitrary explanations, eg
      • · ‘There’s more twos than any other number’;
      • · ‘It’s the easiest one to get’;
      • · ‘Twos are the most’.
  • 35. Mathematics Paper Q15a Next Page Answers Peanuts cost 60p for 100 grams . What is the cost of 350 grams of peanuts? Answer like so: £4.22
  • 36. Mathematics Paper Q15a Next Page Peanuts cost 60p for 100 grams . What is the cost of 350 grams of peanuts? 1 x 60p = 100g 2 x 60p (£1.20) = 200g 3 x 60p (£1.80) = 300g ½ x 60p (30p) = 50g 300g + 50g = 350g £1.80 + 30p = £1.80 + £0.30 = £2.10 TWO MARK QUESTION
  • 37. Mathematics Paper Q15a Next Page Raisins cost 80p for 100 grams . Jack pays £2 for a bag of raisins. How many grams of raisins does he get?
  • 38. Mathematics Paper Q15a Next Page Raisins cost 80p for 100 grams . Jack pays £2 for a bag of raisins. How many grams of raisins does he get? 80p = 100g £1.60 = 200g £1.60 + 40p = £1.60 + £0.40 = £2 = 250g TWO MARK QUESTION
  • 39. Mathematics Paper Q16a Next Page Kim has some rectangular tiles. Each one is 4 centimetres by 9 centimetres . She makes a design with them. Calculate the width of her design in cm.
  • 40. Mathematics Paper Q16b Next Page Kim has some rectangular tiles. Each one is 4 centimetres by 9 centimetres . She makes a design with them. Calculate the height of her design in cm. Pen tool?
  • 41. Mathematics Paper Q17a Next Page Answer key Tony and Gemma looked for snails, worms, slugs and beetles in their gardens. They each made a pie chart of what they found. Estimate the number of worms that Tony found.
  • 42. Mathematics Paper Q17a Next Page Tony and Gemma looked for snails, worms, slugs and beetles in their gardens. They each made a pie chart of what they found. Estimate the number of worms that Tony found. One quarter of 80 = 20 (a) An answer in the range 21 to 26 inclusive. No mark is awarded for an answer which is not a whole number.
  • 43. Mathematics Paper Q17b Next Page Answer key Tony and Gemma looked for snails, worms, slugs and beetles in their gardens. They each made a pie chart of what they found. Who found more snails ? Tony or Gemma. Explain how you know.
  • 44. Mathematics Paper Q17b Next Page Tony and Gemma looked for snails, worms, slugs and beetles in their gardens. They each made a pie chart of what they found. Who found more snails ? Tony: ¼ of 80 = 20 Gemma: ½ of 36 = 18
    • (b) An explanation which recognises that Tony’s snails are a quarter of 80 and that Gemma’s snails are half of 36, so that Tony found more, eg
      • · ‘Tony found 20 and Gemma found only 18’;
      • · ‘Quarter of 80 is more than half of 36’.
    • No mark is awarded for circling the correct answer of ‘Tony’.
    • Do not accept vague or arbitrary explanations, eg
    • · ‘Tony found loads more’;
    • · ‘Gemma found more but Tony’s amount is bigger’.
    • Accept a correct, unambiguous explanation even if the wrong name is circled.
  • 45. Mathematics Paper Q18 Next Page Answers Which two numbers multiply together to make 1 million ?
    • 10
    • 100
    • 1000
    • 10 000
    • 100 000
  • 46. Mathematics Paper Q18 Next Page Which two numbers multiply together to make 1 million ?
    • 10
    • 100
    • 1000
    • 10 000
    • 100 000
    100 x 10 000 = 1 000 000 Count the zeros 6 A and E also works!
  • 47. Mathematics Paper Q19 Next Page Liam has two rectangular tiles like this. He makes this L shape. What is the perimeter of Liam’s L shape in cm? Pen tool?
  • 48. Mathematics Paper Q20 (out of 23) Next Page Answer key
    • This sequence of numbers goes up by 40 each time.
      • 40 80 120 160 200 …
    • This sequence continues.
    • Will the number 2140 be in the sequence?
    • Explain how you know.
  • 49. Mathematics Paper Q20 (out of 23) Next Page
    • This sequence of numbers goes up by 40 each time.
      • 40 80 120 160 200 …
    • This sequence continues.
    • Will the number 2140 be in the sequence?
    • Explain how you know.
    • Explanation which recognises that the numbers in the sequence are multiples of 40 and that 2140 is not OR that only the even hundreds in the sequence have the numbers ending in 40, eg
    • · ‘it doesn’t divide by 40’;
    • · ‘140 isn’t in it so 2140 won’t be’;
    • · ‘it will go 2000, 2040, 2080, 2120, 2160 ... so there’s no 2140’.
        • No mark is awarded for circling ‘No’ alone.
        • Do not accept vague or arbitrary explanations, eg
          • · ‘It’s odd, so it won’t be there’;
          • · ‘It’s not part of the sequence’.
  • 50. Mathematics Paper Q21 (out of 23) Next Page Answers Calculate 8.6 – 3.75
  • 51. Mathematics Paper Q21 (out of 23) Next Page Calculate 8.6 – 3.75 Set out in the correct columns: U . 1/10 1/00 8 . 6 - 3 . 7 5 4 . 8 5 What is here? 0
  • 52. Mathematics Paper Q22a (out of 23) Next Page The shaded triangle is a reflection of the left hand triangle in the mirror line. What is the first co-ordinate of point A?
  • 53. Mathematics Paper Q22b (out of 23) Next Page The shaded triangle is a reflection of the left hand triangle in the mirror line. What is the second co-ordinate of point A? 11
  • 54. Mathematics Paper Q22c (out of 23) Next Page The shaded triangle is a reflection of the left hand triangle in the mirror line. What is the first co-ordinate of point B? 11 9 A = ? B =
  • 55. Mathematics Paper Q22d (out of 23) Next Page The shaded triangle is a reflection of the left hand triangle in the mirror line. What is the first co-ordinate of point B? 11 9 A = 15 ? B =
  • 56. Mathematics Paper Q23 – last question Answer key Leila knows that 65 × 3 = 195 Explain how she can use this information to find the answer to this multiplication: 165 × 3
  • 57. Mathematics Paper Q23 End of paper Leila knows that 65 × 3 = 195 Explain how she can use this information to find the answer to this multiplication: 165 × 3
    • Explanation which indicates that 300 can be added to 195, eg
    • · ‘It’s 3 × 100 more’;
    • · ‘You add another 300 on’;
    • · ‘3 × 65 = 195, 3 × 100 = 300 so it’s 495’;
    • · ‘100 has been added to 65, so multiply 100 by 3 and add it to 195’.
        • An answer to the multiplication is not required and no mark is awarded for it.
        • Do not accept vague answers such as:
          • · ‘You work it out’;
          • · ‘Do a sum’;
          • · ‘It’s nearly the same except it has 100 in front of it’.