Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Assessments Through the Learning Process - A Questionmark Presentation

2,259
views

Published on

Assessments Through the Learning Process - A Questionmark Presentation. Make sure to check out the speaker notes for more information about each slide.

Assessments Through the Learning Process - A Questionmark Presentation. Make sure to check out the speaker notes for more information about each slide.

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,259
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Assessment solutions can be designed and deployed for:Learning – as part of the learning process to analyze needs, determine skills gaps, guide the learning experience, survey what participants thought of the learning experience (did they like it? Was it relevant? Were the learning materials and environment ok?), and to gauge how much participants learned.Qualification – Summative Assessments “Sum Up” a person’s knowledge, skill and/or abilities. (e.g. Graduation exams, Pre-employment Skills Tests, Certification/Licensure Exams)Performance – We can define the performance metrics that we want to measure and analyze them. For example, if measuring performance in a call center, these could be very job-specific (e.g. number of calls completed; average hold/wait time; etc.) or might be at an organization or business-unit level (e.g. sales/revenue; customer satisfaction, etc.)Accumulation and subsequent analysis of this data enables effective evaluation and data-driven decision making. During this presentation, we’ll focus on how assessments are used through the “learning” process
  • Learning, education and training are now delivered in many ways including classroom instruction, video lectures, online courses, podcasts, and short on-the-job learning modules. Whatever the delivery method, it’s critical to understand how people learn, what they have in fact learned, and whether this knowledge is useful for their particular role. Well-crafted assessments can guide people to powerful learning experiences; reduce learning curves; extend the forgetting curve; confirm skills, knowledge and attitudes; and motivate people by giving them a solid sense of achievement. Assessments are used at specific times during the learning process in order to achieve one or more results.
  • The diagram above is a useful reference to show the points at which assessments can be used. Here are details about the purpose of each type of assessment: Job Task Analysis – given to those doing a job to harvest data about their activities in order to determine instructional goals and objectivesNeeds Analysis – given to groups of people to determine the types of learning opportunities that should be made availablePre-Learning Test – given as preparation prior to a formal learning event to promote intrigue, establish benchmarks, and gather data to help the instructorIn/As Learning Assessments – given during work and learning experiences to improve memory recall and to correct misconceptionsOf Learning Assessments – given to establish what has been learned and whether a person is qualifiedCourse Evaluations - provide feedback to help improve the environment and make it more conducive for learningSlow Forgetting Curve – given to provide retrieval practice, which helps learners strengthen memory and potentially improve skills.
  • Diagnostic assessments are typically used in pre-learning assessments, before a person engages in a learning experience or a placement test. For example, a college student whose second language is English might take a test to discover if his or her English skills are adequate for taking certain courses. The test measures that person’s current knowledge and skill, thereby helping the instructor tailor the course effectively. These kinds of test also create intrigue, which can in turn actually enhance the learning experience. For instance, if an instructor asks a question that a student can’t answer, that student might become curious to find out the answer and therefore pay more attention in the class.
  • Formative assessments help reassure learners that they’re actually learning or alert them that they are not learning and provide feedback to correct any misconceptions. Research on Web sites has found that people tend to take quizzes first and use the feedback so they can say: “Hey, I’m doing pretty well in this subject. I’m going to move on,” or “I need to study this topic more.” Not only did they discover their level of competence, but they also inadvertently reduced their forgetting curve by experiencing some search and retrieval practice.These formative assessments are sometimes used to collect data that contribute to overall grades. They’re not like the final exam, but are rather like a series of small tests that provide evidence that helps instructor make a judgment.
  • Summative assessments are just what they sound like: They sum up the knowledge or the skills of the person taking the test. This type of assessment provides a quantitative grade and makes a judgment about a person’s knowledge, skills and achievement. Summative assessments include: Post-course exams, licensing exams, certification tests, and other medium or high-stakes assessments—both regulatory and non-regulatory. These assessments provide quantitative scores signifying how much knowledge or skill the participants have acquired.
  • Our ability to retrieve knowledge at the right time is based on many factors, including the stimulus used to trigger our memory search and retrieval. The more similar the stimulus in the learning situation is to the stimulus in the performance situation, the better the ability of the learner to remember what they learned. Questions can act as such stimuli. The more a question can "simulate" the learners' performance situation, the more it will facilitate remembering.
  • In a Perfect World…
  • …we would remember everything we learn!
  • In the actual world…
  • …we forget some of it!We know that repetition helps learning, but constant repetition can be distracting and not very stimulating. We know that repetition helps learning, but constant repetition can be distracting and not very stimulating. We know that repetition helps learning, but constant repetition can be distracting and not very stimulating. We know that repetition helps learning, but constant repetition can be distracting and not very stimulating.  You get the point! Many factors influence how much people learn and what they can retrieve: the learning environment, the manner in which the material is presented, how that material is taught, and others.
  • You want your learners to remember what you're teaching them. What should you do? 1. Avoid repeating the learning material. 2. Repeat the learning material immediately and repeat it exactly as is. 3. Repeat the learning material immediately but paraphrase it. 4. Repeat the learning material after a delay and repeat it exactly as is. These techniqueshelp diminish forgetting. Repetition constantly reinforces new information for learners, and feedback can correct any misconceptions. However, we’re often overly optimistic about our ability to remember information. By spacing questions over time, we can reduce the forgetting curve by providing ongoing search and retrieval practice which aids the learning process. If someone had asked you to solve an algebraic equation every week since you left school, the chances are good that you would still be able to solve one. This would be useful if you ever planned to go back to school or use algebra on the job.
  • Assessments play an important part in the learning process. Diagnostic assessments can direct us to suitable learning experiences. Formative assessments can help us enhance learning by directing attention, creating intrigue, providing search and retrieval practice, and correcting misconceptions. For example, well designed pre-questions can create intrigue before a learning event even starts. And asking questions during the learning event forces students to turn off the distractions and go through that search and retrieval process in order to respond. Questions bring students back on track because they must respond.
  • Providing simple, corrective feedback to participants can be very useful for correcting misconceptions, pointing participants to appropriate remediation, and improving the overall learning retention. When using Questionmark Perception, feedback can be given at:The question level – providing feedback based on what “choice” a participant selected on a given question. The topic level – based on how a participant scored on a group of relatedThe assessment – based on how a participant scored on an overall quiz, test or exam.When is feedback useful?Dealing with difficult questions: Helps participant understand, learn from errorCorrecting major errors: Errors that demonstrate a fundamental misunderstanding of a topicGeneral guidelines on feedback…Improving performance: Give the participant guidance for improving their skill or knowledgePrecision: Be precise enough that the participant knows what needs to be improvedLearning resources: Tell the participant how and where to go to acquire the informationTimes you might avoid giving feedback…When security is important: Where doing so may compromise the integrity of the test as a wholeWhen questions are related: When it may provide clues to answer other questions
  • To yield real benefits from the assessment techniques, begin by identifying your goals: Do you need to identify qualified people, improve customer service, improve response times, or meet regulatory compliance? Next, document the topics and learning objectives. Determine the style of assessments that your organization needs to achieve the goals you have set out. These assessments will enable your organization and your learners to reach their (and your) objectives. Finally, decide how you’d like to administer these assessments. Questionmark can provide technologies and services to help you achieve the results you seek. You can learn more from www.questionmark.com, or if you’d like more information on this white paper and others visit our white paper page: http://www.questionmark.com/whitepapers/index.aspx.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. www.questionmark.com
    • 2. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Introducing Diagnostic, Formative, Summative and Reaction Assessment
    • 3. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Diagnostic Assessment  Used to identify the needs and prior knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) of participants for the purpose of directing them to the most appropriate learning experience KSA’s Needed KSA’s Measured KSA’s for learning/change initiative to focus on
    • 4. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged.  A quiz or similar assessment focused on providing practice for search and retrieval from memory to strengthen learner recall and to provide prescriptive feedback.
    • 5. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged.  An assessment focus on providing a definitive grade and/or make a judgment about the participant's achievement. If this judgment verifies that the participant has met an established standard indicative of special expertise, the judgment may confer “certification.”
    • 6. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged.  An assessment used to determine the satisfaction level with a learning or assessment experience. Often referred to as “Level 1” evaluations, course evaluations, or “smile sheets,” these assessments are typically completed at the end of a learning or certification experience.
    • 7. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf-Learning Assessments Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place
    • 8. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf Learning Assessments Windows CDJob Task Analysis Windows CDCourse Evaluations Windows CDNeeds Analysis Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place Windows CDSlow Forgetting Curve
    • 9. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place Purpose: • Create intrigue • Route to course • Inform instructors • Establish benchmarks Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf Learning Assessments
    • 10. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place Purpose: • Encourages focus on learning • Provide instant feedback to instructor • Stimulate and strengthen memory • Correct misconceptions Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf Learning Assessments
    • 11. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place Purpose: • Was learning environment okay? • Knowledge transfer occurred? • Reduce Forgetting Curve • Certifications Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf Learning Assessments
    • 12. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 12 Ouch! The Forgetting Curve Time Knowledge/Skills Learning Experience Learning Experience Learning Experience Questions Questions Purpose: • Content repetition • Memory retrieval practice • Strengthens memory recall Purpose: • Content repetition • Memory retrieval practice • Strengthens memory recall
    • 13. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 13
    • 14. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 14
    • 15. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 15
    • 16. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 16
    • 17. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 17 Time Knowledge/Skills Learning Experience Learning Experience Learning Experience Questions Questions Questions Questions Purpose: • Memory retrieval practice • Strengthens memory recall • Reduce Forgetting Curve Purpose: • Memory retrieval practice • Strengthens memory recall • Reduce Forgetting Curve
    • 18. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 18 Time Knowledge/Skills Questions Questions Questions Questions Questions Create Intrigue Strengthen Memory Reduce Forgetting
    • 19. Slide 19 Learning Benefits from Questions Learning Benefit Min Max Pre-questions (to focus attention) 5% 40% Repetitions Initial Subsequent 30% 15% 110% 40% Feedback 15% 50% Retrieval Practice 30% 100% Questions Spaced Over Time 5% 40% 100% 380%
    • 20. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Slide 20 Feedback to correct misconceptions, point to appropriate learning resources “Topics” of questions answered in assessment Score on topic
    • 21. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Learning Evidence Accumulated Windows CDPrepare For Learning Windows CDIn/As Learning Assessments Windows CDOf Learning Assessments Windows CDJob Task Analysis Windows CDCourse Evaluations Windows CDNeeds Analysis Mentoring Instructor Collaborative & E-learning Work Place Windows CDSlow Forgetting Curve
    • 22. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged.  Recent blog articles:  Evidence from Medical Education that Quizzes Do Slow the Forgetting Curve  So what do we mean by assessments anyway?  Conference Close-up: Using Questionmark to Reinforce Learning within SharePoint  Multiple choice quizzes help learning, especially with feedback  Answering questions directly helps you learn  New York Times advises that tests help you retain learning  Measuring Learning Results: Eight Recommendations for Assessment Designers  Two part Q&A between Questionmark Chairman John Kleeman and Professor Roddy Roediger  Professor Roddy Roediger on applying the retrieval practice effect to creating and administering assessments  Advice from Cognitive Psychologist Roddy Roediger on using retrieval practice to aid learning
    • 23. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. Questionmark Blog http://blog.questionmark.com Questionmark Group on Facebook Questionmark on Twitter Questionmark can provide technologies and services to help you achieve the results you seek. Learn more from www.questionmark.com, or if you’d like more information on this white paper and others visit our white paper page: http://www.questionmark.com/whitepapers/
    • 24. Copyright © 1995-2010 Questionmark Corporation and/or Questionmark Computing Limited, known collectively as Questionmark. All rights reserved. Questionmark is a registered trademark of Questionmark Computing Limited. All other trademarks are acknowledged. www.questionmark.com