.credit-suisse Performance Indicators / Ratings

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.credit-suisse Performance Indicators / Ratings

  1. 1. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES CONTENTS 1. SPI-Finance 2002: Social Performance Indicators for the Financial Industry 2 1.1. Corporate Social Responsibility Management 2 1.2. Internal Social Performance 6 1.3. Performance to Society 9 1.4. Suppliers 9 1.5. Retail Banking 9 1.6. Investment Banking 10 1.7. Asset Management 10 1.8. Insurance 10 2. EPI-Finance: Performance Indicators 2001 for Environmental Management 11 2.1. Environmental Management Indicators 11 2.2. Product Ecology Indicators 11 3. VfU-Figures: Performance Indicators 2001 for Operational Ecology 12 4. List of Funds and Rating Agencies which hold/recommend Credit Suisse Group shares 13 5. Memberships and Commitments 14 1
  2. 2. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 1. SPI-Finance 2002: Social Performance Indicators for the Financial Industry 1.1. Corporate Social Responsibility Management 1.1.1. Corporate Social Responsibility Policy – Credit Suisse Group’s Code of Conduct One of the strengths of Credit Suisse Group is the competence and diverse skills of its staff. Despite global diversity, our corporate culture has to be based on common denominators and shared values. This has led to the introduction of our internal group-wide Code of Conduct, approved by both the Board of Directors and the Group Executive Board at the beginning of 2000. Especially in fast-changing times, common values help to give the individual a sense of focus; they create identity and a sense of belonging. Spelling out our six ethical and six performance core values and guiding principles, the Code of Conduct extends and supplements existing compliance manuals, directives, guidelines and policies. The complete Code of Conduct applies to all employees and is available in 20 different languages. Six Core Ethical Values INTEGRITY – We realize that our global franchise is based on our core ethical values and our long-standing reputation for integrity, trust, confidentiality, fairness and professionalism. We respect the interests of our stakeholders (clients, employees, shareholders, service providers, government authorities, financial regulators, competitors, media) and of society as a whole. RESPONSIBILITY – We honor our commitments and take personal responsibility for our actions. We promise only what we can deliver. We do not mislead our stakeholders. FAIRNESS – We believe in courteous and respectful treatment of our stakeholders. We support equal opportunities and a work environment free of discrimination and harassment of any sort. COMPLIANCE – We acknowledge the importance of all relevant laws, regulations, policies and standards, both internal and external, and comply with them. We are committed to exemplary management discipline and a first class control and compliance environment. TRANSPARENCY – We seek constructive, transparent and open dialogue with our stakeholders based on fairness, mutual respect and professionalism. CONFIDENTIALITY – We treat confidential information as such and do not disclose non-public information concerning the Credit Suisse Group companies, their clients and employees, unless required by law. Six Core Performance Values SERVICE – We are committed to providing superior service to our clients. We believe that knowing our clients and offering them value by combining good judgment, in-depth knowledge and prompt and courteous service leads to success. EXCELLENCE – We are committed to excellence through continuous improvement of our management practices and know-how. Problems or mistakes are viewed as a chance to improve. TEAMWORK – We believe in achieving more for our stakeholders by working together to draw upon our individual and collective strengths and abilities worldwide and across business lines. COMMITMENT – We recognize individual contribution to the current and future success of our firm and reward it objectively, taking into account the personal contribution to targets, governance and teamwork. Every employee contributes her/his best to reach our common goals, by maintaining focus and intensity of effort. RISK CULTURE – We base our business operations on conscious, disciplined and intelligent risk taking. We believe in independent risk management, compliance and audit processes with proper management accountability for the interests and concerns of our stakeholders. PROFITABILITY – We are committed to sustained profitability which enables us to carry out our strategies, make long-term invest- ments, fairly compensate our staff and achieve an attractive return for our shareholders. Legality, compliance and our core ethical values, however, come before profits. 2
  3. 3. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 1.1.2. Corporate Social Responsibility / Sustainability Organization The responsibility for the social aspects of Credit Suisse Group’s activities permeates all areas of business and the entire organiza- tion of the company. The Code of Conduct as value code that is binding for all employees serves as a guide for economically, ecol- ogically and socially responsible behavior. Policies and guidelines, which are based on the code and developed variably according to the business area and geographical region, take account of the social and ecological aspects of Credit Suisse Group’s entrepreneu- rial actions. These policies refer to the human resources policy, to the design and execution of products and services, to cooperation and compliance with regulatory requirements, to the dealing with suppliers, with the environment as well as with the relationships of the company within the communities it operates and other business concerns. The chart below illustrates the inter-play of the various elements Credit Suisse Group uses to pursue a sustainable business policy, and shows which stakeholder groups it engages in dialog: 1.1.3. Management of Sensitive Issues Credit Suisse Group endeavors to approach sensitive issues in an active manner and to bring about a solution – in cooperation with the industry sector or other stakeholders when appropriate. Credit Suisse Group provides information about such issues in its publi- cations. The Swiss Banks and the Second World War Ever since the debate about the conduct of the Swiss banks during and after the Second World War, Credit Suisse Group has been committed to making amends both morally and financially. The review of the banking issues involved was brought to a close with the publication of the Volcker Committee final report. The report came to the conclusion that the banks carried out their business activi- ties with great professional diligence. There was no evidence of systematic discrimination against victims of Nazi persecution, nor of systematic concealment of assets or withholding of assets from their rightful owners. However, the report did document some ex- tremely regrettable cases of human error and insensitivity. The dormant accounts discovered as part of the Volcker Committee’s 3
  4. 4. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES research are an element in the comprehensive settlement reached by Credit Suisse Group, UBS, the plaintiffs and the Jewish or- ganizations in the 1998 class action brought in the USA. (Annual Report 1999/2000, p. 37, http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/annual_report_99/download/csg_ar99_p1_en.pdf) China’s Three Gorges Project The Three Gorges dam project, the largest of its kind in the world, is intended to supply a significant proportion of China’s power needs. The potential environmental implications - the reduction in biodiversity, the extinction of endangered species and the impact on China’s climate – and the necessary resettlement of more than 2.5 million people have made this a controversial project. CSG has been criticized by NGOs and the media for its role in funding the project. As early as 1996, however, CSG declined to provide direct financing for the scheme and took the policy decision only to play a subordinate role in any related transactions. While we did not provide direct financing for the Three Gorges project for environmental reasons, our purely strategic interest in infrastructure bonds enables us to play a key role in China as an important market for the future through bond issues for infrastructure projects in other areas (agriculture, telecommunications, road-building, etc.). In this way, we can also make a contribution to China’s economic development. (Environmental Report 1999/2000, Long version, p. 51, http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/ecoreport00/download/ecoreport2000_en.pdf) Chad-Cameroon Oil and Gas Pipeline This project proposes to construct an oil and gas pipeline from Chad to the coast of Cameroon. In places, the pipeline will cross precious rainforests and savannah. It will also negatively impact the traditional homeland of some of the region’s indigenous peoples. The project has been the subject of an extremely comprehensive environmental and social compatibility study in accordance with World Bank guidelines, which came to the conclusion that - provided certain conditions are met - the environmental impact of the construction and operation of the pipeline will fall within acceptable boundaries, particularly given the positive impact on the region’s economic development. CSFB’s role in this project has not been to provide financing, but to advise the governments of Chad and Cameroon on project management. But even this less direct involvement required an in-depth assessment of the potential environmental risks associated with it. Since the environmental and social impact assessment came to the conclusion that the project is acceptable our involvement in this transaction is in line with our global environmental policy. (Environmental Report 1999/2000, Long version, p. 51, http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/ecoreport00/download/ecoreport2000_en.pdf) Commitment to Maintaining a Swiss Airline The events related to SAirGroup, and the commitment of the public and private sectors to maintaining a Swiss airline, have met with considerable interest and prompted often heated discussions both in Switzerland and abroad. Credit Suisse Group would like to explain its efforts and course of action concerning this issue. On October 1, 2001, UBS and Credit Suisse Group announced a package of CHF 1.35 billion to support efforts to build up a new Swiss airline and maintain airline-related businesses. With this package, the banks were able to prevent the bankruptcy or the filing of a debt moratorium by the entire SAirGroup, to the benefit of all creditors and stakeholders. This in turn prevented the collapse of the entire company, including Crossair and the airline-related businesses, which would have had dramatic implications for the econ- omy and for Zurich Airport, and would have resulted in tens of thousands of job losses. In addition, UBS and Credit Suisse Group agreed to voluntarily pay out the deposits of CHF 110 million held by SAirGroup employees in employee accounts with the company. With this commitment, Credit Suisse Group has made a contribution towards maintaining the global position of Switzerland – its domestic market – and thus acted in keeping with the interests of its staff, clients, shareholders and other stakeholders in Switzer- land and abroad. This financial package is commercially prudent. In addition, the major banks hoped that their efforts would help build confidence among further potential investors. On Monday, October 22, 2001, it was announced that a broad-based financing of the new airline was essentially secured, subject to certain conditions, thanks to the combined efforts of a large number of private sector companies, individuals and the public sector. This solution is a sign of national solidarity and of collective determination under extraordinary circumstances. All of the investors have stated that they are willing to hold their stake in the new airline for at least twelve months. In view of the current uncertainty in the global airline industry, the investors are aware that there are risks associated with their com- mitment. 4
  5. 5. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES Following the capital increase for the new airline, Credit Suisse Group holds a stake of approximately ten percent. Credit Suisse Group regards its commitment as a financial investment and will not be involved in the operational management of the company. (Quarterly Review Q3/2001, p. 7, http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/q3review2001/download/pdf/csg_qr3_2001_en.pdf) 1.1.4. Participation: Stakeholder Dialogue Extracts from SAM Corporate Sustainability Questionnaire 2001: Stakeholder involvement (Questions 72-76) Remark to the table above (involvement of suppliers): In contrast with the extract of 2001’s SAM questionnaire displayed where, where no involvement of suppliers in social issues of the company’s business strategies is indicated, the current pilot scheme for service provides and suppliers, developed in 2001 and launched in the first half of 2002, requires them to adhere to social guidelines (see also section 1.4. Suppliers). 5
  6. 6. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 1.2. Internal Social Performance 1.2.1. Internal Corporate Social Responsibility Policy Credit Suisse Group provides competitive and progressive working conditions for its nearly 80,000 employees and is committed to maintaining a workplace in which employees are treated and treat one another with consideration, dignity and respect. The employ- ment guidelines and regulations are based among other things on the Code of Conduct and are adapted to the specific business units and cultures, and in accordance with the regulations and applicable laws of the respective countries. The following aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility are at the forefront: P EQUAL EMPLOYMENT. Credit Suisse Group provides equal employment opportunities and prohibits discriminatory prac- tices on the basis of race, color, age, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status or disability or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. This includes equal pay for equal work and promotional opportunities (s. Code of Conduct, „Fairness“). P FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION. Credit Suisse Group grants freedom of association, right to collective bargaining (granted by Credit Suisse Group‘s signing of the Global Compact), co-operation with employee representatives. P DEVELOPMENT. Credit Suisse Group provides support of further professional training and development of employees (s. Code of Conduct, “Excellence”). P WORK TIME. Credit Suisse Group offers innovative and flexible work models such as part-time work, job-sharing, non- traditional schedules or working from home. In addition, many business units offer special paid “time – off” programs such as paternity leave and sabbaticals. P REDUNDANCY. Credit Suisse Group provides support for employees impacted by job reductions. P COMMUNICATION. Credit Suisse Group cannot resolve issues that are not brought to its attention and therefore encour- ages open, frank communication about matters of concern to employees. Concerns and complaints that are brought to the attention of the company will be handled appropriately through the local confidential communication, grievance or dispute resolution processes. P HEALTH & SAFETY. Credit Suisse Group is committed to doing all that is reasonably practicable, as well as all that may be required by applicable law, to protect the health of employees and ensure their safety while they are at work. 1.2.2. Staff Turnover and Job Creation 31.12.2001 Staff 31.12.2000 Change from 2000 in % 22,346 Switzerland Banking 21,454 +4 6,297 Insurance 6,781 -7 28,415 Abroad Banking 30,666 -7 22,641 Insurance 21,637 +5 Total Staff CSG 79,699 80,538 -1 Voluntary departures: The rate for voluntary departures from Credit Suisse Group was 10.3% in 2001. This represents a reduction from the 2000 volun- tary turnover rate of 11.3% by a tenth and is competitive within the financial services industry, This measure provides evidence of an ever increasing high degree of employee satisfaction and loyalty. 6
  7. 7. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES Job reductions: Following the acquisition of the investment bank Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette and the general economic downturn in the financial services sector, necessary cost reduction measures commenced in 2001. These measures were implemented to ensure the contin- ued competitiveness of Credit Suisse First Boston and inevitably involved a reduction in staff costs, including the cutting of 2,500 jobs. The employees concerned were assisted with their search for new work. At Credit Suisse Financial Services, a reduction of between 700 and 800 jobs was announced in mid-2001 as part of the rationali- zation of the business unit’s organizational structure. Special intranet sites and fair-play rules ensured that everyone was kept regularly informed and that the redeployment processes treated all employees equally. Measures were formulated in collaboration with the Staff Commission in Switzerland to help employees find new jobs; where requested, retraining and early retirement opportunities were also offered. This streamlining process should be carried out over the next two years and will as far as possible be effected through normal attrition. Despite all efforts to limit redundancies, some employees experienced periods of uncertainty. 1.2.3. Employee Satisfaction Employee interviews are carried out in varying intervals on the level of business unit or smaller organizational units. These interviews, surveys and processes are designed to highlight new developments and employee concerns as well as areas where action is re- quired. In general, CSG is viewed as a positive place to work. Results from past surveys have noted the desire for a better work-life balance, for a reduction of bureaucratic procedures and better communication and visibility of senior management. 1.2.4. Senior Management Remuneration Compensation to non-executive Board members is set annually by the Board of Directors following a recommendation by the Com- pensation and Appointments Committee based on a review of Board compensation levels at comparable companies. The aggregate compensation paid to the members of the Board of Directors for 2001 was approximately CHF 2.6 million which includes compen- sation for nine individuals; the Chairman, who does not receive separate compensation, is excluded. Compensation to the Group Executive Board and other senior executive officers is set by the Compensation and Appointments Committee in accordance with its charter, based on extensive reviews of market data as well as individual and company perform- ance. The aggregate compensation paid to officers for 2001 was approximately CHF 135.5 million (including cash bonus and shares or equity awards) and approximately CHF 4.0 million in accrued pension benefits. Aggregate compensation paid to officers includes compensation for the Group Executive Board (10 individuals, including John J. Mack, who was appointed a Group Executive Board Member in July 2001, and former Group Executive Board Member Allen D. Wheat, whom John J. Mack replaced) and senior executive officers who also perform executive management functions (18 individu- als). Equity Component of Compensation: Directors receive all of their compensation in the form of Credit Suisse Group registered shares that are blocked for a period of four years. Officers who are subject to Swiss taxation and are ordinarily resident in Switzerland are subject to the Credit Suisse Group Swiss Share Plan and receive a part of their compensation in the form of Credit Suisse Group registered shares. Officers who are employed outside Switzerland are subject to the Credit Suisse Group International Share Plan and receive a part of their compensa- tion in the form of restricted equity awards. Under the Swiss Share Plan, shares are blocked for a period of four years following the grant, subject to continued employment. Upon termination of employment, blocked shares generally become free. Under the International Share plan, awards settle over the four-year period following the grant, subject to continued employment and certain other conditions, and may settle earlier upon ter- mination of employment. For the fiscal year 2001, as part of their total compensation indicated above, members of the Group Executive Board and senior executive officers were granted, as a group, 478,621 restricted shares or awards with a multi-day average market value of CHF 70.65 per share/award. Members of the Board of Directors were granted, as a group, 31,360 restricted shares with a market value at the day of grant of CHF 81.50 per share for the 2001/2002 office term. 7
  8. 8. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES Option Awards: The Group has share option plans under which the Compensation and Appointments Committee may periodically grant incentive options to officers. The options are granted at a price not less than the fair market value of the underlying Credit Suisse Group share at the date of grant. The options awarded for 2001 become exercisable three years after the date of grant and expire ten years after the grant. For the fiscal year 2001, the Group granted members of the Group Executive Board and other senior executive officers of Credit Suisse Group, as part of the normal compensation process, options on 1,101,259 shares, with an exercise price of CHF 65.75 per share equaling the share price at the day of grant. In addition, 2,624,132 options were granted as new-hire incentive awards with an exercise price of CHF 72.38 per share. These options vest over three years and become exercisable three years after the date of grant and expire ten years after the grant. 1.2.5. Bonuses Fostering Sustainable Success At Credit Suisse Group a component of employee compensation is paid in the form of Credit Suisse Group shares that usually must be held for a period of four years. In addition, options on Credit Suisse Group shares are issued which are also blocked for a certain period, the exercising of which is largely dependent on the fulfilment of performance objectives and other conditions. Employees own approximately 8% of Group shares, thus aligning employee and shareholder interests. 1.2.6 Equal Opportunity: Female – Male Salary Ratio Credit Suisse Group is committed to maintaining a work place that provides equal opportunities and is free of discrimination on the basis of race, color, age gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status, or disability or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. This prohibition applies to hiring, promotion, transfer, compensation, termination and all other terms and conditions of employment. Credit Suisse Group monitors the key indicators related to the equity of female – male salary ratios and reports the respective fig- ures to the responsible government agencies where applicable. The performance of Credit Suisse Group complies with applicable law and practices. 1.2.7. Equal Opportunity: Employee Profile Credit Suisse Group is committed to maintaining a work place that provides equal opportunities and is free of discrimination on the basis of race, color, age gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status, or disability or any other characteristic protected by applicable law. This prohibition applies to hiring, promotion, transfer, compensation, termination and all other terms and conditions of employment There is a global focus on diversity initiatives to help CSG business units attract and retain the talent needed for future success. These initiatives include recruiting efforts to attract women in management positions, campus recruiting programs / sponsorship to attract diversity candidates, women’s leadership committees in the USA and UK, and diversity programs in Switzerland. Credit Suisse Group monitors the key indicators related to the issue of equal opportunities and reports the respective data to the responsible government agencies in compliance with applicable local law or practice. More detailed information regarding the number of employees per business unit can be found in the annual report in the section „Business Units Review”, http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/csgn/pdf/ar2001_full_book_en.pdf 8
  9. 9. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 1.3. Performance to Society 1.3.1. Charitable Contributions In 2001, as in the preceding year, several units within Credit Suisse Group contributed a total amount of around CHF 15 million to social, cultural, educational and charitable organizations and projects. Additionally, in a worldwide campaign of solidarity Credit Suisse Group, Credit Suisse First Boston and the employees donated an- other USD 6.5 million in support of the families of public service workers who fell victim to the September 11 terrorist attacks. Furthermore, Credit Suisse Financial Services contributed the equivalent of one hour’s salary for each of the 40,000 employees to the Ticket to Life project of UNICEF. The project is dedicated to the unregistered, and thus legally non-existent, children, an issue to which the employees of Credit Suisse Financial Services devoted with various activities at least one hour on World Day 2001. The voluntary efforts of many employees and departments in favor of charitable organizations, non-profit groups and neighborhood centers is not measured and displayed. However, more can be read about this in the Social Responsibility Report of the Credit Suisse First Boston Foundation: http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/csgn/pdf/csfb_foundation_social_res_rep_01.pdf 1.3.2. Company’s Annual Value Added See Annual Report 2001, Overview of Business Unit Results, page 14: http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/csgn/pdf/ar2001_full_book_en.pdf 1.4. Suppliers Screening of Major Suppliers As well as asking for proof of a progressive approach to environmental issues, Credit Suisse Group will in future require its service providers and suppliers to adhere to social guidelines. These guidelines draw on the principles set out in the environmental standard ISO 14001, the social standard SA8000 and the UN Global Compact. Among other things, they call for compliance with environ- mental legislation, safe handling of dangerous substances and good practice with regard to child labor and trade union freedom. A pilot scheme was launched in the first half of 2002. 1.5. Retail Banking (incl. Corporate Banking) 1.5.1. Retail Banking, Policy for Consumer Credits Extracts from mission statement Consumer Credits: P We achieve our profits through market-oriented products and optimal structures, not through inflated interest rates. P We are aware of our social responsibility when approving credit. [...] It is part of our due diligence to avoid over- indebtedness. P We practice a socially responsible encashment. In the event of blameless welfare cases we lend a hand to find an amicable solution. P We demand from our staff entrepreneurial and socially responsible thinking and action. 9
  10. 10. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 1.5.2. Corporate Banking, Extract of Credit Policy P We do not enter into any credit business in which the creditworthiness and solvency of the borrower is unproven. Lending transactions involving excessive risks must be refused, as must those which are unjustifiable for legal, ethical or environ- mental reasons. Observance of this principle and the associated credit guidelines must always take precedence over the achievement of volume targets. P We do not enter into any business with undesirable borrowers. The description 'undesirable' applies, in particular, to borrow- ers who do not comply with the law or violate ethical principles 1.5.3. Corporate Banking, Lending Profile See Annual Report 2001, Consolidated Financial Statements, table 19.2, p. 95: http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/csgn/pdf/ar2001_full_book_en.pdf 1.6. Investment Banking Investment Banking, Customer Profile See Annual Report 2000/2001, Consolidated Financial Statements, table 29, p. 83: http://www.credit-suisse.com/en/annualreport2000/pdf/ar2000_2001_p5_en.pdf 1.7. Asset Management Assets Under Green Management / Assets under Management with High Social Benefit Investment business Notes Credit Suisse Group assets under management CHF 1,425.5 billion Assets under green management / assets with high CHF 692 million CS Global Sustainability, CS Fellowship social benefit Fund, etc. 1.8. Insurance Responsible Marketing: Customer Complaints Based on an electronic tool within the Quality Management System (ISO 9001 certified) of Wintherthur Life & Pensions customer complaints are registered, settled and monitored. After the analysis of the reasons measures for improvement are initiated. 10
  11. 11. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 2. EPI-FINANCE INDICATORS 2001 OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 2.1. Environmental Management Indicators 2001 Credit Suisse Group Headcount (as at 31.12.2001) 79’699 Environmental Specialists (in full-time posts) 17 Staff trained in environmental issues 390 Training time (in hours) 585 2.2. Product Ecology Indicators (as at 31.12.2001) Corporate credit business Notes Credit value, Switzerland 2001 CHF 42,693 million Credit subject to basic environmental screening 100 % All credit facilities are screened for environmental risk Investment business Notes Credit Suisse Group assets under management CHF 1,425.5 billion Assets under green management / assets with high CHF 692 million CS Global Sustainability, CS Fellowship social benefit Fund, etc. 11
  12. 12. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 3. VFU-INDICATORS 2001 OF OPERATIONAL ECOLOGY1 VfU indicators set out an internationally established standard for the comparison and benchmarking of banks, savings banks and insurance companies with regard to operational ecology. 3.1. Switzerland absolute2 Indicators specific data quality trend 2000- 20013 Electrical power consumption 217 million kWh 7,800 kWh/head good é 75 kWh/m2 Heat energy consumption 134 million kWh good è 3 107 litres/head per day Water consumption 748,300 m average ê Total paper consumption 7,115 tonnes 255 kg/head good î Copier paper consumption 273 million sheets A4 9,770 A4 sheets/head very good é Waste 8,050 tonnes 288 kg/head good î Air Travel 80 million km 2,900 km/head very good é 4 CO2 emissions 82,650 tonnes 2,960 kg/head é 3.2. International Sites absolute5 Indicators specific data quality trend 2000- 20013 Electrical power consumption 365 million kWh 13,770 kWh/head good ì Other energy consumption 10 million kWh 360 kWh/head good ê (oil, gas, district heating, etc.) 1,549,000 m3 Water consumption 233 litres/head per day average é Total paper consumption 10,727 t 404 kg/head good ì Copier paper consumption 692 million sheets A4 26,000 A4 sheets/head good é Waste 10,040 t 378 kg/head average ì Air Travel 536 million km 20,220 km/head very good é 4 CO2 emissions 286,065 tonnes 10,780 kg/head ì 1 For comments and explanations, see Credit Suisse Group Sustainability Report 2001, chapter “Operational Ecology”, pages 16-17 2 Energy, water and waste data was available for around 80% of staff in Switzerland and an energy reference area of 1.39 million m2. Absolute consumption figures were projected on the basis of all data for the entire Swiss system (27,913 full-time posts). 3 The trend is measured in relation to specific indicators 2000. 4 CO2 emissions generated directly by electricity, heating provision and air travel 5 Energy, water, paper and waste data was available for around 65% of staff for all international CSFB premises outside Switzerland. Absolute consumption figures were projected on the basis of all CSFB premises outside Switzerland (26,532 desks occupied). 12
  13. 13. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 4. LIST OF FUNDS AND RATING AGENCIES WHICH HOLD / RECOMMEND CSG SHARES Rating agencies/advisors (ranking of Credit Suisse Group where known): P Business in Environment (UK): Top 20% P Centre Info (CH) P Innovest (USA): second place out of 40 financial institutions rated P ökom (DE): second place out of 26 European banks P Sustainability-Stocks Switzerland (Sarasin) Sustainability Stock Indexes: P Dow Jones STOXX Sustainability Indexes (USA/CH) P Dow Jones Sustainability World Indexes (USA/CH) P FTSE4Good Indexes (UK) Socially responsible investment vehicles P Calvert World Values International Equity Fund (USA) P Ethical Balanced Fund (CA) P Ethos – -Swiss Investment Foundation for Sustainable Development P Pictet Sustainable Equities – Switzerland P Storebrand Env. Value Fund (NO) P SEB Invest ÖkoLux (LU) P UBS Eco Performance Funds Over 30 Licenses for Dow Jones Sustainability Index (Total Assets under Management approx. 3.5 bio CHF) P Bâloise Insurance P Deutsche Postbank P HypoVereinsbank P Merrill Lynch P Nikko Asset Management P Rabo Bank P Skandinaviska Enskilda Bank P State Street Global Advisors P Synchrony Asset Management P Westpac Investment Managements 13
  14. 14. CREDIT SUISSE GROUP SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 2001 | INDICATORS AND KEY FIGURES 5. MEMBERSHIPS AND COMMITMENTS Memberships of various associations and specialist groups/committees in which Credit Suisse Group is involved: P Agenda 21 – Zurich Forum for Sustainable Development P Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) P Council on Foundations (COF) P Inolvement in energy initiatives (Energy Model Zurich and Switzerland interest groups) P Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) P Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change (IPCC) P International Association of Volunteer Efforts (IAVE) P Points of Light Foundation P öbu (Swiss Association for Environmentally Conscious Management) P SPI-Finance (Social Performance Indicators for the Financial Industry) P Taten statt Worte P UN Global Compact P UNEP Financial Industry Initiative P UNEP Insurance Initiative P VfU (Association for Environmental Management in Banks, Saving Banks and Insurance Companies) 14

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