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Notetaking Made Easy[2]
 

Notetaking Made Easy[2]

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    Notetaking Made Easy[2] Notetaking Made Easy[2] Presentation Transcript

    • Rosalyn Shahid Oakland University Rochester, Michigan © 2010
    • Why take notes?
      • Research suggests note-taking is a valuable skill set, but warns that not all note-taking is equal. Therefore, four tips are given to the note-taker (Marzano, 2001):
      • 1. “verbatim note taking is, perhaps, the least effective way to take notes” (p. 43)
      • 2. “notes should be considered a work in progress”(p. 44)
      • 3. “notes should be used as study guides for tests” (p. 44)
      • 4. “the more notes that are taken the better”(p. 44)
    • Three Variations of Two-Column Notes
      • 1 . Two-column notes using Major headings
      • 2. Two-column notes changing headings into questions
      • 3. Two-column notes for vocabulary
      • using Major headings
      Two-column notes
    • What are two-column notes using major headings?
      • Two-column notes are one of many note-taking strategies. Two-column notes using major headings is one variation of two-column notes. The purpose for this strategy is to write notes systematically using headings and subheading to structure the layout of the notes. In two-column notes the entire page is used to take notes including the ½ inch margin of the page.
      • Major headings are written in the left column and elaborated upon in the right column. The elaborations may take the form of bulleted points, summary statements, subheadings, defining statements, new information, or synthesis of prior and new knowledge.
    • What are the procedures for taking two-column notes?
      • There are four basic procedures in two-column note-taking:
      • Write the topic or chapter title across the top the notes page.
      • Divide the paper into two columns.
      • Write the major heading of text in the left column.
      • Write key phrases, quotes, or statements that summarize the section’s main ideas in the right column. The following slides provide examples.
    • Step 1:Write the topic or chapter title across the top the notes page Topic or chapter title
    • Step 2: Divide a paper into two columns
      • Divide a paper into two columns: a main idea column which is a 1/3 column on the left of paper and 2/3 column on the right that is reserved for expanding upon the main ideas in the left column.
      Topic Left column 1/3 Include major heading or ideas Right column 2/3 Expand upon the main ideas column
    • Step 3: Write the major headings of text in the left column
      • Click Below to access article
      • http://hcl.harvard.edu/research/guides/lamont_handouts/interrogatingtexts.html
      The following sample notes are taken from the article: Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard Note the article does not indicate “introduction” as a major heading the phrase was added to aid in organization Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard Introduction Previewing: Look “around” the text before you start reading
    • Step 4: Write key phrases, quotes, or statements that represent the section’s main ideas
      • Click Below to access article
      • http://hcl.harvard.edu/research/guides/lamont_handouts/interrogatingtexts.html
      Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard Introduction Previewing: Look “around” the text before you start reading Read actively and deliberately. The habits of active reading are previewing ,annotating ,outline summarize, analyze repetitions and patterns, contextualize, compare and contrast , which may be used simultaneously. Focus your reading through previewing. Consider text organization and how it effects meaning and the authors purpose. Set expectations for reading through previewing.
      • changing headings into questions
      Two-column notes
      • Two column notes changing headings into questions follows the same steps of two-column notes using major heading EXCEPT the notes are organized by rewriting headings and subheadings in the form of a question .
      • Click Below to access article
      • http://hcl.harvard.edu/research/guides/lamont_handouts/interrogatingtexts.html
      Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard Introduction: What is the overall purpose of the reading? What does it mean to look “around” the text before you start reading?
      • To explore the habits of active reading. The habits include:
      • previewing
      • annotating
      • outline summarize, analyze
      • repetitions and patterns
      • contextualize
      • compare and contrast
      • Looking around texts means previewing the information before reading the material. Some examples of previewing are noting the text’s layout, author notes, the writing genre.
    • Let’s practice
      • Make your own two-column notes using major headings on points from the article we have not discussed.
      • for vocabulary
      Two-column notes
      • Similar to two-column notes using major headings, two-column notes for vocabulary follow the same steps EXCEPT the right column is reserved for vocabulary terms and the left column is reserved for its definition.
      • Glance at the article which words would you highlight if you were to use two-column notes for vocabulary.
    • What classes might two-column notes be most effective?
      • Two column notes may be effective in most disciplines, particularly areas where there is a heavy emphasis on reading or vocabulary study.
      • Some include:
      • Social sciences
      • Natural sciences
      • English
      • Math (particularly two-column notes for vocabulary)
    • Conclusion
      • Two-column notes are a study strategy that have been proven to improve:
      • Student achievement
      • Retention of information
      • Organization of notes
      • Structured notes for review
    • Questions or Comments
      • Take a moment to reflect on how you might include two-column notes into your study program.
      • What are your thoughts?
    • Quadrant Notes
    • What are quadrant notes?
      • Quadrant notes are four boxes divided in equal length and width where each quadrant is reserved for a chunk of information based on the learners preference.
    • Step 1
      • Divide an 8 1/2 X 11 piece of paper in four quads. This can be accomplished by folding loose leaf paper twice, once horizontally at the center, then vertically so that all four corners meet. If you decide to use a spiral notebook simply draw a line down the center and across the width of the page at the center. Of if you prefer to use a computer simply create a 2X2 table using your computer’s layout.
    • Step 2
      • Write the title of the article and date across the top of the paper.
      Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard 1/3/10
    • Step 3
      • Label each quadrant with the information you want to seek out. One of the unique features of quadrant note taking is its reliance on the learner to decide how or what should be studied. Unlike two-column notes, which relies primarily on how the author divided sections quadrant notes allow learners to use the quads discriminately.
      Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard 1/3/10 List 5- 7 key points What information is new to me? What were my misconceptions about this topic? What is the primary purpose of this piece?
    • Step 4
      • Read the material then write notes.
      • You may decide to add several pages of quad notes or you may limit your note taking to one page. This is up to you and your needs.
      Interrogating Texts: 6 Reading Habits to Develop in Your First Year at Harvard 1/3/10
      • List 2-5 key points
      • Readers must actively engage in reading.
      • Use strategies like previewing, annotating, outlining summarizing, analysis, contextualizing, & compare /contrast simultaneously.
      What information is new to me? Dialoguing with myself. I’ve never considered having an ongoing conversation between me and the text. What were my misconceptions about this topic? What is the primary purpose of this piece?
    • Step 5
      • Remember notes are works in progress.
      • Review notes often.
      • Add to notes if needed.
      • Consider how this reading material fits into the overall goal for the course.
      • Make connections between your reading and the world.
    • Let’s Practice
      • Refer to the article. How would you label each quad? Why?
      • Using traditional outlines to write papers
      Traditional Outlining
      • Traditional outlines may be used as a note-taking strategy when reading material
      • Or
      • Traditional outlines may be used as a way to provide structure when writing your own papers.
    • Using traditional outline to write papers
      • College students are frequently asked to show what they have learned in a given course through a written essay. If you have not already been asked to produce an essay, you will soon. Therefore it is extremely important to understand how to take notes for the purpose of writing an essay.
    • Traditional Outline Example
      • Traditional outlines are organized by major topics and subtopics. The major topics are labeled with roman numerals flushed to the right and the subtopics are indented under the major topic with and labeled with letters.
      • I. introduction
      • II. Major topic 1
      • a. subtopic
      • b. Subtopic
      • III. Major topic 2
      • a. subtopic
      • IV. Major topic 3
      • a. subtopic
      • b. subtopic
      • c. subtopic
      • V. Conclusion
    • Traditional Outline Example
      • Although outlines have often been noted for having at least two points for every major topic or subtopic, some people who outline do not follow this pattern (see roman numeral III). The ultimate goal is to flush out how the paper will be written before writing begins.
      • I. introduction
      • II. Major topic 1
      • a. subtopic
      • b. Subtopic
      • III. Major topic 2
      • a. subtopic
      • IV. Major topic 3
      • a. subtopic
      • b. subtopic
      • c. subtopic
      • V. Conclusion
    • Let’s practice
      • Imagine you were asked to write a paper on what you learned throughout this presentation. Create an outline to show how you would develop your paper.
    • What are your thoughts?
      • Have you used outlining in the past?
      • Do you believe this method has the potential to benefit you as a learner?
      • How likely is it that you will use outlining in the future? Explain.
    • References
      • Shahid, H. (2008). The effects of implementing culturally relevant teaching, two column note taking and graphic organizers in the pedagogical stances and instructions of secondary content teachers. Unpublished Dissertation, Oakland University, Rochester, MI.
      • Vacca, R. T., & Vacca, J. L. (2002). Content area reading literacy and learning across the curriculum (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
      • Walters, T. S. (1990). Notetaking while reading a textbook. Michigan Reading Journal, 23 , 34-37.
      • Walters, T. S. (2006). Content reading: Reading and learning in subject areas. Unpublished manuscript. Oakland University.
    • Thank you