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Etude PwC sur les écarts salariaux (2013)
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Etude PwC sur les écarts salariaux (2013)

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http://pwc.to/16P5AWX …

http://pwc.to/16P5AWX
L'analyse de PwC repose sur les estimations des niveaux relatifs de salaires mensuels moyens faites par l'Organisation internationale du travail (OIT ou "ILO" en anglais), avec une projection d'ici 2030 réalisée à partir des résultats de la dernière étude "The World in 2050" (Le monde en 2050) de PwC.

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  • 1. Global wage projections to 2030 September 2013 www.pwc.co.uk/economics
  • 2. PwC Summary: Wage gap between emerging and advanced economies will shrink significantly by 2030 • By 2030, our projections in this report suggest that wage levels in the emerging economies will show a significant degree of catch up with those in the developed economies. This reflects both higher labour productivity growth in emerging economies and expected long-term appreciation of their currencies over the period to 2030. It also reflects the marked tendency since the late 1990s for real wages in advanced economies to rise more slowly than productivity growth, which we expect to continue at least in the short term, although it may fade in the longer run. • As its relative wage levels rise, China will become more attractive as a consumer market and less important as a low cost production location. This will also apply to other middle income emerging economies such as Poland, Turkey, Mexico and South Africa. • Countries such as India and the Philippines could become more attractive manufacturing locations due to their continued relatively low wage levels compared to China, but only if they can provide the right institutional environments and improve their transport and energy infrastructure. Current economic problems in India may also impact upon firms’ willingness to expand there in the short term, but the country still has great long-term potential. • UK firms must decide if they want to locate in the lowest cost areas such as Asia, or if they would prefer to locate in areas such as Eastern Europe where wages are not as low, but they are closer to the UK in terms of both distance and institutions. ‘Onshoring’ may become a more attractive option for UK businesses as it has for some US companies in recent years. 2 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 3. PwC Our methodology for projecting relative wage levels • We began by taking estimates for average wages per month in 2011 (in US dollars at market exchange rates). These estimates were calculated for a previous piece of PwC analysis (How big is the global pay gap?) using 2009 raw wage data from the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and some supplementary data for 2010-11 from the IMF World Economic Outlook database. • We projected real wages in domestic currency terms forward to 2030 using annual labour productivity growth estimates from our latest ‘World in 2050’ study, which is available from http://www.pwc.com/en_GX/gx/world-2050/the-brics-and-beyond-prospects-challenges-and- opportunities.jhtml • However, we made a downward adjustment to these projected wage growth rates for developed economies as evidence shows that real wages grow on average by less then labour productivity in advanced countries (by around 0.7 percentage points per annum in 1999-2012 according to ILO estimates – we assume this effect gradually tapers away to zero by 2030). • No such downward adjustment was made for emerging economies since, on average, ILO data suggests that real wages in such economies do grow broadly in line with labour productivity growth. 3 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 4. PwC Our methodology for projecting relative wage levels (cont’d) • We also included the effects of long-term trends in the real exchange rate for each country based on projections from our World in 2050 study. Economic theory suggests that, in the long run, market exchange rates move gradually towards purchasing power parity rates as a country develops. Purchasing power parity (PPP) refers to the exchange rate at which a representative basket of goods and services would cost the same amount in different countries. For example, the current price of a haircut is higher in London than in Beijing, but as China continues to develop, the price in Beijing can be expected to move closer to the price in London. • The precise rate of real exchange rate appreciation is uncertain, however, and this should be taken into account by interpreting our projections as indications of likely broad trends, rather than being precise point forecasts. The precise projections presented below for 2030 are inevitably subject to significant margins of error. • We chose to end our analysis at 2030 as relatively few businesses will look beyond this time horizon in making location decisions given the ever widening margins of uncertainty in later decades. 4 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 5. PwC In 2011, Australia led the way (due to its relatively high exchange rate compared to PPP levels) with emerging economies some distance behind developed countries Sources: ILO, IMF, PwC Analysis 4,471 3,821 3,621 3,562 3,482 3,466 3,433 3,045 2,566 2,361 1,493 1,448 1,153 1,056 948 834 677 523 467 169 132 - 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 Australia France Canada Japan US Germany UK Italy Spain South Korea Turkey South Africa Poland Russia Brazil Argentina Malaysia China Mexico Philippines India Average wage per month in 2011 ($) 5 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 6. PwC By 2030, South Korea, France and Germany could have the highest average wages while countries such as Turkey and Poland begin to catch up with the major developed economies Sources: ILO, IMF, PwC Analysis 5,040 5,022 4,911 4,818 4,665 4,598 4,574 4,544 4,496 4,189 3,914 3,517 3,137 2,815 2,128 2,057 1,941 1,900 1,197 616 581 - 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 South Korea France Germany Australia UK Canada US Japan Italy Spain Turkey South Africa Poland Russia Argentina China Malaysia Brazil Mexico India Philippines Average wage per month in 2030 ($) 6 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 7. PwC Relative to the US and the UK, the emerging economies are all projected to show significant convergence in wage levels by 2030 – even if precise speed of convergence is uncertain Sources: ILO, IMF, PwC Analysis US UK Spain South Africa China India Mexico Turkey Poland Philippines 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 Averagewagepermonth(US=100) US UK Spain South Africa China India Mexico Turkey Poland Philippines 7 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 8. PwC Relative to the US and UK, the emerging economies show significant growth in average wages (index with US = 100) Sources: ILO, IMF, PwC Analysis Country 2011 2020 2030 US 100 100 100 UK 99 99 102 Spain 74 83 92 Turkey 43 63 86 South Africa 42 57 77 Poland 33 51 69 China 15 29 45 Mexico 13 19 26 India 4 8 13 Philippines 5 8 13 8 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 9. PwC The emerging economies outperform the developed economies when looking at projected average growth of real wages over 2011-2030, including real exchange rate changes Sources: ILO, IMF, PwC Analysis -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% Averagerealwagegrowthpain$:2011-2030 Labour productivity growth effect (minus the wedge) Real exchange rate effect Total real wage growth 9 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 10. PwC Alternative wage data sources: ILO vs BLS In the analysis above, we use 2011 estimates for the average wage per month based on data from the ILO. However, the U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics (BLS) also provides relative wage data that could be used in this analysis. There are two main reasons why we chose to focus on the ILO data: 1. The ILO data, in most cases, is based on the whole economy whereas the BLS data only relates to the manufacturing sector. Since our labour productivity growth estimates cover the whole economy, using the ILO data is more consistent. 2. The ILO data covers a larger range of emerging countries than the BLS data, which for example, does not include China or India in a consistent manner. However, the BLS data also has its advantages: 1. The BLS data more accurately reflects total labour costs for employers because payroll taxes are included, whereas the ILO data just reflects the average wage received by employees. 2. Although the BLS data only covers manufacturing, these estimates may be somewhat more reliable than for the economy as a whole. They also have a longer track record than the ILO data. We therefore repeated our analysis using the BLS data where this was available. While the general story of the emerging economies catching up with the advanced economies over time remains the same, there are some differences that arise when using the BLS data due to different starting points for relative wages in 2011 (see next slide for details). This emphasises that more attention should be paid to the general trends indicated in relative wages, rather than precise point estimates that are inevitably subject to significant uncertainties. 10 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 11. PwC Looking at different data sources for 2011 changes the results somewhat with BLS data suggesting wage levels in South Korea may not be as high as ILO data implies Sources: ILO, IMF, BLS, PwC Analysis Sources: ILO, IMF, BLS, PwC Analysis 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 WagesrelativetotheUSin2011(US=100) 2011 (ILO, IMF) 2011 (BLS) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 WagesrelativetotheUSin2030(US=100) 2030 (ILO, IMF) 2030 (BLS) 11 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 12. PwC Business implications of shrinking wage gaps • China will become more significant as a consumer market and less important as a low wage production location. This will also apply to other middle income emerging economies in the Middle East, Latin America and Eastern Europe. • Countries such as India and the Philippines could become more attractive manufacturing locations due to their continued relatively low wage levels, but only if they can provide the right institutional environments and improve their transport and energy infrastructure. • Current economic problems in India may impact upon firms’ willingness to expand there in the short-term, but it still has great long-term potential. The Philippines could be one of the most attractive South East Asian locations (alongside countries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam) taking over from China as a key low cost production hub. • UK firms must decide if they want to locate in the lowest cost areas in SE Asia, or if they would prefer to locate in EU countries such as Poland where wages are not as low, but they are closer to the UK in terms of both distance and institutions. One advantage of countries like Poland is that it may be easier to control the quality of the goods being produced. • ‘Onshoring’ may also become a more attractive option for the UK as it has for some US companies recently. This may be particularly true if the UK follows the US in developing low cost local energy reserves from shale gas and shale oil that can offset higher domestic wage costs. 12 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 13. PwC However, while wages are important when deciding on locations, companies should also consider ease of doing business and wider measures of country competitiveness Source: World Bank Ease of Doing Business Index Source: World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index Country Ease of Doing Business Rank (1=most business-friendly regulations) US 4 UK 7 South Africa 39 Spain 44 Mexico 48 Poland 55 Turkey 71 China 91 India 132 Philippines 138 4.0 4.2 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.4 5.6 5.8 6.0 GlobalCompetitivenessIndexScore(1-7) 13 September 2013Global labour cost projections
  • 14. Contacts This publication has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this publication without obtaining specific professional advice. No representation or warranty (express or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this publication, and, to the extent permitted by law, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, its members, employees and agents do not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this publication or for any decision based on it. © 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved. In this document, “PwC” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (a limited liability partnership in the United Kingdom) which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity. For more information about this report please contact: John Hawksworth (john.c.hawksworth@uk.pwc.com) Conor Lambe (conor.r.lambe@uk.pwc.com) For more information on our Economics and Policy services, please visit our website at: http://www.pwc.co.uk/economics-policy/index.jhtml