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Coach Al Lyman, CSCS, FMS, HKC© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic Performanc...
Why This Spreecast?Why Train With Power?Let’s Review Some BasicsTesting and Your ZonesPractical Training Applications...
 Accurately test current ability and track progress over time Accurately testing current physical response to riding (se...
Functional Threshold Power (FTP) = 1 hour best powerNormalized Power (NP) = average of the averages of a ride;weighs “ha...
© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic Performance
Functional Threshold Power TEST: 20min, 30min, 60min?Other options: Race data (Olym or Sprint); Data collected over time...
© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceAndrew Coggan`s Power Trainin...
© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceCoggan’s Power Training Zones...
 Cycling is hugely “stochastic,” e.g. variable Learn how subtle changes in pedal pressure result inlarge changes in watt...
© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat about “Aerobic” Threshold?
(Endurance is not just about what and how you eat, itsalso about how you train! )FACT: to develop true aerobic endurance,...
© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat Is An Ideal Lactate Curve?
 Practically speaking: the upper range of z2/low z3 for experienced mid to upper z2 for less experienced mid z2 for no...
 Heart rate is a reflection of work, not a measure of it It is not the best tool for measuring intensity on the bike Do...
 Are you training to “train,” or training to “race?”  Two examples: 1. A moderate length group ride in early spring wi...
 “The faster you go, the faster you go” Long hills vs. short hills Rollers vs. an isolated hill The right approach: H...
 Variable courses, by nature, encourage a variableapproach to riding (pushing harder on the ups, relaxingand coasting on ...
 Did you keep to the “spirit” of the workout? Did you do the appropriate (correct) number ofintervals? Were you close t...
 Purposeful training: training to improve or training to race?• Different approaches on different days is smart training•...
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Training with Power

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Transcript of "Training with Power"

  1. 1. Coach Al Lyman, CSCS, FMS, HKC© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceTraining with PowerMay 22, 2013
  2. 2. Why This Spreecast?Why Train With Power?Let’s Review Some BasicsTesting and Your ZonesPractical Training ApplicationsFour Training “Take Homes”Questions?© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceOur Goals For This Evening:“Power at lactate threshold is the most important physiological determinantof endurance cycling performance….” – Andrew Coggan, Ph.D
  3. 3.  Accurately test current ability and track progress over time Accurately testing current physical response to riding (settingtraining zones) Accurately capping z2 (aerobic) intensity, and decoupling also Ability to accurately establish goal race intensity zones and allowfor accurate training in those zones As a carrot to chase (motivation); improved focus (mindfulness) Power is constant. A watt is a watt is a watt. Heart rate and RPEaren’t. More fun? © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhy Train With Power?
  4. 4. Functional Threshold Power (FTP) = 1 hour best powerNormalized Power (NP) = average of the averages of a ride;weighs “harder” efforts more heavily; is a more accuraterepresentation of the physiological cost (work) of a rideTraining Stress Score (TSS) = Qualifies workout load basedupon duration and intensity of the trainingIntensity Factor (IF) = workout NP / current FTP; equal to apercent of FTP, e.g. .85IF = 85% of FTPVariability Index (VI) = NP divided by AP; how variable yourride isCoupling/Decoupling = a measure showing how heart rateand power relate to each other as a ride progresses© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceSome Basics
  5. 5. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic Performance
  6. 6. Functional Threshold Power TEST: 20min, 30min, 60min?Other options: Race data (Olym or Sprint); Data collected over time inTP/CPTake your results and plug them into Coggan’s Training Zonescalculator (see next slide)Zones are zones for a reasonSee the “AJ example” in the TWP guide© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceTesting And Your Zones“Testing is training and training is testing” – Andrew Coggan, Ph.D.
  7. 7. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceAndrew Coggan`s Power Training ZonesFTP watts (.95 of test) 260 TT wattage estimate toolTT heart rate 175 Average watts 265Average Pulse 150Estimated TT wattage #####A Coggan`s Levels Wattage Range Heart Rate Rangez1 Active recovery less than 143 watts less than 119 bpmz2 Endurance 146 195 watts 121 145 bpmz3 Tempo 198 234 watts 147 165 bpmz4 Threshold 237 273 watts 166 184 bpmz5 Aerobic Power 276 312 watts more than 184 bpmz6 Anaerobic capacity more than 315 watts na na bpmSee the next slide for a basic layout of the six training zones
  8. 8. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceCoggan’s Power Training ZonesZone 1: Active RecoveryAverage power: <50% of FTPZone 2: EnduranceAverage power: 56-75% of FTPZone 3: TempoAverage power: 76-90% of FTPZone 4: Threshold (lactate and/or functional)Average power: 91-105% of FTPZone 5: VO2 MaxAverage power: 106-120% of FTPZone 6: Anaerobic CapacityAverage power: >121% of LTP
  9. 9.  Cycling is hugely “stochastic,” e.g. variable Learn how subtle changes in pedal pressure result inlarge changes in wattage output What gear you choose, and what cadence you chooseto ride at, determines your power output. The choicesare yours! With power, you’ll have a new relationship with hillsand the wind Understand the “aerobic” threshold and what it meansto avoid the “gray zone.” Flattening the course on the bike (riding smarter), willnot only lead to a faster bike split, it will make you afaster runner!© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat’s Next? Practical Training ApplicationsFirst, remember these important concepts….
  10. 10. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat about “Aerobic” Threshold?
  11. 11. (Endurance is not just about what and how you eat, itsalso about how you train! )FACT: to develop true aerobic endurance, we should trainin the middle to upper range of our aerobic zone for aslong as possible (and still be able to routinely recover). Fat burning vs. sugar burning Requires focus, concentration, mindfulness Want to be able to go faster for longer duration? Seekto raise your aerobic threshold When you cross over the “aerobic” threshold, you areslightly anaerobic, e.g. this is the “gray” zone. Avoid crossing this threshold during aerobic training!© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat about “Aerobic” Threshold?
  12. 12. © PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat Is An Ideal Lactate Curve?
  13. 13.  Practically speaking: the upper range of z2/low z3 for experienced mid to upper z2 for less experienced mid z2 for novice Makes differentiating intensity,” a key concept centralto training smart, sometimes more challenging This is slightly harder than “JRA” – more “steady” It is easier than you think! Very easy to accomplish for 1 hour or less. MUCHharder to do for many hours in a row!!© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat about “Aerobic” Threshold?
  14. 14.  Heart rate is a reflection of work, not a measure of it It is not the best tool for measuring intensity on the bike Do not use Coggan HR zones as your guide unless noother tool exists to gauge intensity Heart rate is best used: To review and assess training response after the fact As a tool to assess appropriate hydration, fueling, etc.,e.g. normal cardiovascular stress Be aware at what HRs various power/wattage levels“happen,” and correlate these numbers with RPE. Correlation of all of the available tools = experience =improved intuition, decision making in training and on therace course© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat about Heart Rate?
  15. 15.  Are you training to “train,” or training to “race?”  Two examples: 1. A moderate length group ride in early spring withtraining partners, or a “how you feel” ride…. 2. A long ride three weeks out from your goal race,with some sets in the ride AT YOUR race intensity. Should you? Push hard at the base of the hill? Push over the crest of the hill? Build into the hill? Or blast it and hang on as long as you can!What is the right approach?© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat About Hills?
  16. 16.  “The faster you go, the faster you go” Long hills vs. short hills Rollers vs. an isolated hill The right approach: Hold back early, build into the hill gradually. Picking the right intensity will allow you to get up the hillquickly without causing undo fatigue. Takes practice (it’s a skill!) Being familiar with the hill helps! Know the course.© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceWhat About Hills?
  17. 17.  Variable courses, by nature, encourage a variableapproach to riding (pushing harder on the ups, relaxingand coasting on the flats and downs)Could you ride faster if you held BACK on the up-hills butpushed HARDER on the flats and down-hills?  Ride faster in those valleys and carry more speed intothe next hill, which in turn means you’re riding fasterthrough the entire section© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceFlattening The Course
  18. 18.  Did you keep to the “spirit” of the workout? Did you do the appropriate (correct) number ofintervals? Were you close to your zones? At the lower end orthe upper end of those ranges? Did you do the correct overall volume of work? Did you see appropriate “coupling” of HR and power,for aerobic or race specific sessions?© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceTraining Review
  19. 19.  Purposeful training: training to improve or training to race?• Different approaches on different days is smart training• Recovery is your primary dictator Training with Power teaches discipline and patience Take time to study and learn what the numbers mean… Don’t suffer from paralysis by analysis – keep the spirit of thetraining and you’ll be doing great!© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE© PURSUIT ATHLETIC PERFORMANCETEAM Pursuit Athletic PerformanceFour Training “Take Homes”:“When RPE is low, power is high; when RPE rises, power drops.They are inversely related”– Coach Al
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