Peterson - Bright, Tough, and Resilient
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Peterson - Bright, Tough, and Resilient

  • 984 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
984
On Slideshare
984
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  Title:  Bright,  tough,  and  resilient-­‐-­‐and  not  in  a  gifted  program.  By:  Peterson,  Jean  Sunde,  Journal  of  Secondary  Gifted  Education,  10774610,  Spring97,  Vol.  8,  Issue  3  Database:  Professional  Development  Collection  BRIGHT,  TOUGH,  AND  RESILIENT-­‐AND  NOT  IN  A  GIFTED  PROGRAM  Abstract  Research,  identification,  and  programs  in  gifted  education  have  typically  not  accommodated  the  "tough  bright,"  described  in  this  article  as  abused,  neglected,  and  undernurtured-­‐-­‐a  subgroup  in  the  "diversity"  gifted  education  has  been  admonished  to  identify  and  serve.  Qualitative  analysis  of  language  generated  in  structured  interviews  with  a  group  of  high-­‐ability,  at-­‐risk  middle-­‐school  children  (N  =  11),  who  had  not  been  identified  for  special  programming,  yielded  information  related  to  personal  difficulties,  perceived  support,  familiarity  with  danger  and  violence,  home  environment,  school  experiences,  perceptions  of  the  future,  and  resilience.  Suggestions  for  identification  and  programming  are  based  on  findings  in  the  study  They  feel  like  throw-­‐away  children-­‐-­‐not  just  at  home,  but  also  in  school.  They  have  agile  and  creative  minds  and  display  impressive  interpersonal  savvy.  They  are  insightful,  "smart,"  verbally  adept,  heavy  with  young  wisdom,  and  highly  intelligent  in  terms  of  Gardners  (1983)  ideas  concerning  multiple  intelligences.  Yet  they  are  not  affirmed  for  these  qualities  at  home  or  at  school.  Their  parents  are  neglectful,  abusive,  unresponsive,  erratic,  and  abuse  substances  (Berlin,  Davis,  &  Orenstein,  1988;  Pollock  et  al.,  1990).  As  these  children  see  it,  teachers  make  assumptions  about  them  based  on  their  socioeconomic  and  family  situations  (Kramer,  1990).  In  fact,  teachers  may  not  be  nurturing  toward  them  (Sisk,  1988).  By  middle  school,  they  are  alienated  from  school  (Kramer,  1990)  and  may  eventually  drop  out  (Robertson,  1991).  The  present  study  sought  to  learn  about  this  group  of  disadvantaged,  high-­‐ability  children.  According  to  a  scant  number  of  studies  specifically  addressing  them  as  a  subpopulation  among  "gifted  at  risk,"  and  numerous  studies  of  children  of  alcoholics,  these  students  may  exhibit  the  following  characteristics.  They  feel  rage,  are  depressed  and  suicidal  (Meyer  &  Phillips,  1990),  distance  themselves  adaptively  (Berlin  et  al.,  1988),  and  have  behavior  and  academic  problems  (Moss,  Vanyukov,  &  Majumder,  1995).  They  act  out  aggressively  (Pollock  et  al.,  1990;  Tomori,  1994)  and  abuse  substances,  the  latter  more  because  of  stress  and  negative  affect  than  from  rebellion  (Colder  &  Chassin,  1993).  Though  they  have  confused  and  ambivalent  feelings  about  their  parents,  they  remain  loyal  and  enmeshed,  perhaps  blaming  themselves  for  family  distress  (Berlin  et  al.,  1988).  They  have  delinquent  friends  and  may  be  involved  in  delinquent  behavior  themselves  (Brooks,  1980).  Their  parents  use  humiliation,  intimidation  (Meyer  &  Phillips,  1990),  and  heavy  household  responsibilities  (Goglia,  Jurkovic,  &  Burt,  1992)  to  maintain  control  over  them.  A  same-­‐sex  best  friend  is  basic  to  their  self-­‐esteem  (Barrera,  Chassin,  &  Rogosch,  1993),  but  they  may  also  be  isolated  (Berlin  et  al.,  1988;  Meyer  &  Phillips,  1990).  They  struggle  to  make  sense  of  their  complex  contexts  (Berlin  et  al.,  1988).  In  school,  they  may  exhibit  symptoms  of  fetal  alcohol  effects,  which  interfere  with  academic  performance  and  social  ease  (Streissguth,  1994).  Hypervigilant,  they  are  vulnerable  to  rejection,  and  they  may  see  suicide  as  a  "safe  place"  (Meyer  &  Phillips,  1990).  Factors  of  resilience,  "the  ability  to  function  psychologically  at  a  level  far  greater  than  expected  given  a  persons  earlier  developmental  experiences"  (Higgins,  1994),  mediate  the  effects  of  their  situations  (Garbarino,  Dubrow,  Kostelny,  &  Pardo,  1992;  Werner,  1986).  Of  interest  here  are  qualities  of  temperament  (Smith,  1995;  Werner,  1984),  personal  characteristics  (Garmezy,  Masten,  &  Tellegen,  1984;  Werner  &  Smith,  1982),  buffering  family  conditions  (Farrell,  Barnes,  &  Banerjee,  1995;  Rak  &  Patterson,  
  • 2. 1996),  self-­‐understanding  (Beardslee  &  Podorefsky,  1988),  and  environmental  supports  in  the  form  of  mentors,  parental  surrogates,  and  role  models  for  coping  (Bolig  &  Weddle,  1988;  Dugan  &  Coles,  1989).  Intelligence  and  exceptional  talents  (Higgins,  1994)  and  the  desire  to  be  different  from  the  parents  (Herrenkohl,  1994)  are  also  significant  to  positive  outcomes.  Just  as  educators  may  not  recognize  their  high  ability,  these  students  themselves  might  not  believe  they  are  "intelligent,"  since  that  word,  like  "gifted,"  may  translate  into  only  "high  academic  achievement"  for  them.  Nevertheless,  regardless  of  their  academic  performance,  these  students  might  qualify  for  programs  for  the  gifted  and  talented  according  to  the  criterion  of  potential;  that  is,  "capable  of  high  performance,"  in  the  Marland  (1972)  definition.  They  also  might  qualify  on  the  basis  of  performance  on  traditional  assessments  for  such  programs,  such  as  standardized  achievement  tests,  but  perhaps  on  earlier,  not  current,  scores.  Their  performance  on  tests  might  be  erratic  from  year  to  year,  and  that  inconsistency,  too,  can  mean  that  they  are  not  nominated  as  "gifted."  Marcus  (1986)  speculated  that  the  learning  environment  in  homes  where  a  parent  abuses  substances  is  qualitatively  different  from  that  in  others.  Given  that  assessed  vocabulary  level  correlates  highly  with  measures  of  general  intelligence  (Sattler,  1992,  p.  137),  the  lack  of  conversational  contact  with  stable  adults  might  mean  lower  scores  than  those  of  children  who  have  had  the  intellectual  enrichment  of  middle-­‐class  homes.  Those  lower  scores  might  prevent  identification  for  a  gifted  program.  Classroom  teachers  use  good  social  behavior,  a  strong  classroom  work  ethic,  and  positive  verbal  assertiveness  as  criteria  when  referring  students,  and  the  lack  of  any  of  these  can  preclude  nomination  (Peterson  &  Margolin,  in  press).  In  addition,  the  parents  of  these  children  may  be  unlikely  to  advocate  for  them  regarding  special  opportunities  and  programs  for  enrichment,  according  to  Scott,  Perou,  Urbano,  Hogan,  and  Golds  (1992)  relevant  study.  These  students  are  not  only  part  of  the  "diversity"  educators  of  students  with  high  abilities  have  been  admonished  to  identify  and  serve;  they  are  also  economically  or  otherwise  "disadvantaged,"  a  category  needing  attention  for  "learning  opportunities"  and  identification  (Office  of  Educational  Research  and  Improvement,  1993).  Yet  they  may  not  be  among  the  racial  and  cultural  groups  typically  targeted  by  programs  making  efforts  to  be  inclusive.  They  may  be  Caucasian,  but  not  be  "mainstream"  (see  Spindler  &  Spindler,  1990).  In  short,  they  are  usually  not  in  programs  for  the  gifted  and  talented.  As  a  subgroup  within  the  disadvantaged,  highability  population,  these  sometimes  violent,  jaded,  angry,  and  depressed  children,  with  some  exceptions  (e.g.,  Baldwin,  1994;  Brooks,  1980;  Coleman  &  Gallagher,  1992;  Sisk,  1988;  VanTassel-­‐Baska,  1989;  Wang,  1995;  Ward,  1992),  have  not  generated  a  great  deal  of  attention  in  the  literature  related  to  gifted  education.  They  have  usually  not  been  part  of  the  databases  from  which  conclusions  about  "gifted  children"  are  drawn  (e.g.,  Baker,  1994;  Goldstein,  Stocking,  &  Sawyer,  1992;  Olszewski-­‐Kubilius  &  Yasumoto,  1994;  Swiatek,  1995).  Gifted-­‐education  conference  and  symposia  presentations  related  to  them  have  been  rare.  Smart  and  tough,  these  children  are  at  risk  for  dropping  out  of  school,  criminal  behavior,  depression,  and  suicide,  and  not  coming  even  close  to  academic  or  other  performance  that  matches  their  measured  potential.  The  Purpose  of  the  Study  To  address  the  issues  of  whether  these  at-­‐risk,  high-­‐ability  children  should  be  identified,  how  they  might  be  identified,  and  what  kinds  of  responsive  services  are  appropriate  for  them,  the  researcher  conducted  a  qualitative  study,  involving  interviews  and  subsequent  language  analysis,  of  a  group  of  "tough  and  bright"  children  in  order  to  learn  more  about  them.  Of  interest  initially  were  their  self-­‐perception,  negative  and  positive  school  experiences,  resiliency  factors,  and  home  environment.  The  study  was  undertaken  with  the  assumption  that  by  becoming  knowledgeable  about  these  children,  educators  of  the  gifted  can  determine  effective  ways  to  serve  them.    Participants  
  • 3. The  participants  were  10  (7  females,  3  males)  middle  school  students,  among  33  (19  females,  14  males)  who  had  been  referred  as  "the  most  needy  and  the  most  difficult"  for  a  series  of  focused,  semi-­‐structured,  small-­‐group  discussions  (Peterson,  1990,  1995)for  "students  with  concerns"  in  the  two  middle  schools  in  a  midwestern  community  of  25,000.  The  researcher  led  the  activity  as  part  of  an  inter-­‐agency  approach  to  supporting  children  at  risk.  One  additional  female  student,  a  14-­‐year-­‐old  ninth  grader  who  had  participated  the  previous  year  in  the  groups,  was  also  interviewed,  for  a  total  of  11  study  participants.  These  11  students  had  scored  at  or  above  the  approximately  90th  percentile  on  the  Iowa  Test  of  Basic  Skills  (ITBS;  Hieronymous  &  Hoover,  1986)  on  at  least  one  subtest  (vocabulary,  reading  comprehension,  language,  science,  math,  social  science)  or  the  composite  sometime  during  their  school  years.  One  or  both  parents  of  nine  of  the  study  participants  were  suspected  of  abusing  substances.  Ninety-­‐four  percent  of  the  33  at-­‐risk  group  participants  were  Caucasian.  All  of  the  study  participants  were  Caucasian  and  were  roughly  one-­‐third  (30%)  of  those  who  had  been  referred  for  the  groups  in  the  two  schools  (37%  of  the  female  students,  21%  of  the  male  students).  None  of  these  students  was  currently  identified  as  "gifted."  In  a  few  cases,  one  or  two  teachers  seemed  aware  of  their  ability,  but  most  of  the  study  participants  were  not  doing  well  academically,  had  problems  with  absenteeism  and  behavior,  had  been  or  were  depressed,  and  had  contact  with  substances  and  delinquency.    Screening  and  selection  criteria  for  programs  for  students  with  high  ability  continue  to  rely  on  achievement  tests  and  other  such  academic  measures  (Maker,  1996).  Given  the  typical  practice  of  selecting  students  in  the  top  3%-­‐5%  on  a  nationally  standardized  measure  (Colangelo  &  Kerr,  1990;  Richert,  1991),  the  approximately  90%  level  used  in  selecting  participants  for  this  study  might  be  seen  as  inappropriately  generous.  However,  as  stated  earlier,  it  might  be  assumed  that  the  scores  of  these  children  would  have  been  higher  had  they  had  stable  and  well-­‐functioning  home  contexts.  That  the  scores  of  most  had  declined  in  recent  years  also  suggests  that  environment  had  had  an  effect  on  their  performance  on  achievement  tests.  Prior  to  the  interviews,  all  participants  had  attended  at  least  one  group  session  with  the  researcher.  All  but  one  had  attended  most  of  the  sessions  of  their  particular  group.  They  were,  therefore,  acquainted  with  the  researcher  and  had  established  some  rapport  prior  to  the  interview,  probably  important  in  light  of  the  lack  of  trust  that  can  exist  in  homes  with  conflict-­‐ridden,  neglectful,  substance  abusing,  or  abusive  parents  (Meyer  &  Phillips,  1990).  The  study  participants  will  be  identified  by  pseudonyms  in  the  discussion  which  follows.    The  Setting  The  small  city  where  the  schools  were  located  had  experienced  a  significant  demographic  shift  over  the  past  decade,  the  result  of  corporate  downsizing  and  the  relatively  new  presence  of  a  meat-­‐packing  plant.  There  was  a  growing  immigrant  Latino  population.  In  the  two  schools  together,  12%  of  the  total  middle  school  population  of  1,262  was  from  minority  groups,  with  Latino  students,  at  8%,  being  the  largest  minority  group.  The  resulting  upheaval  was  evident  in  the  schools:  students  whose  intown  addresses  changed  often;  whose  parents  worked  two  or  three  low-­‐paying  jobs  and  had  little  contact  with  their  families;  whose  parents  were  substance  abusers;  who  were  abused  and  neglected  at  home;  who  became  anxious  as  summer  approached,  because  they  would  lose  the  structure  that  school  provided;  and  who  were  largely  in  charge  of  household  management-­‐-­‐laundry,  cooking,  cleaning,  and  childcare.  In  the  schools  and  in  the  discussion  groups,  there  was  frequent  discussion  of  gang  activity  and  violence.    
  • 4. Method  After  a  review  of  school  records  revealed  their  relatively  high  ITBS  scores,  the  11  students  were  invited  to  participate  in  a  structured  interview.  Parental  permission  was  given  either  in  writing  or  by  phone  in  response  to  a  letter  explaining  that  the  child  was  being  invited  for  an  interview  because  of  perceived  high  ability.  The  interviews  were  conducted  in  a  conference  room  and  lasted  from  45  to  75  minutes.  The  students  were  asked  18  open-­‐ended  questions  (see  Appendix  A).  Only  one  Participant,  the  student  with  the  poorest  attendance  in  the  discussion  groups,  did  not  elaborate  with  answers.  However,  based  on  nonverbal  behavior,  she,  like  the  others,  seemed  pleased  to  be  viewed  as  "bright,"  and  all  were  alert,  attentive,  and  cooperative.  With  that  one  exception,  they  appeared  to  respond  ingenuously  and  earnestly.  Answers  were  both  audiotape-­‐recorded  and  recorded  on  laptop  computer.  The  necessary  equipment  did  not  appear  to  be  a  sustained  concern  for  the  participants.  Subsequent  to  the  interviews,  the  transcript  language  was  analyzed  for  themes  regarding  self-­‐perception,  resilience,  positive  and  negative  school  experiences,  and  home  environment,  using  a  color-­‐coding  system  that  marked  various  recurring  themes  with  an  identifying  color.  All  color-­‐coded  comments  were  then  classified  into  respective  color  groups  and  reclassifted  further,  with  new  colors,  since  the  initial  analysis  had  produced  additional  strands  of  interest:  their  vision  of  the  future;  significant  support  personnel;  difficulties,  vulnerabilities,  and  fears;  familiarity  with  danger  and  violence;  emotional  lability;  strategies  for  coping  with  difficult  circumstances;  and  concerns  relevant  to  gifted  education.  In  some  cases,  information  was  tallied  quantitatively  in  order  to  determine  the  relative  salience  of  particular  thematic  categories.    Findings  Analysis  of  the  students  language  yielded  assorted  themes,  which  might  appropriately  be  considered  descriptors  of  this  group  of  at-­‐risk  students  with  high  ability.  The  most  dominant  themes  were  their  familiarity  with  a  dangerous,  difficult,  and  unpredictable  world,  their  sensitivity  to  negative  messages  in  school,  and  their  selfreliance  and  resilience  ("I  guess  I  just  make  it  through").  Their  longing  for  reliable  parent  contact  and  for  someone  to  listen  to  and  affirm  them  ("My  best  friends  mom-­‐-­‐always  been  there,  always  nice")  was  also  a  significant  theme.  Several  were  forgiving  of  indifferent  or  unavailable  parents  ("She  sounds  like  shes  a  bad  person,  but  she  just  makes  some  mistakes";  "He  doesnt  do  it  on  purpose.  He  just  forgets  what  weve  planned").  They  worried  about  their  parents  and  siblings  ("I  worry  a  lot  about  my  sister";  "I  think  about  my  brother  all  the  time"),  their  friends  lived  dangerously,  and  they  relied  on  their  intelligence  ("my  brain")  to  survive.  However,  high  ability  could  also  cause  pain  in  the  immediate  family  ("Thats  one  reason  I  get  flack  from  my  sister  and  brother";  "She  says,  `You  think  youre  so  deep").  In  descending  order,  in  terms  of  the  incidence  of  their  appearance  in  student  answers,  the  themes  are  listed  in  Table  1.  Teachers  and  grandparents  were  named  most  often  as  "the  nicest  people"  in  response  to  an  open-­‐ended  question.  Teachers  were  also  named  most  often  as  someone  who  "understands  me"  in  response  to  an  open-­‐ended  question  concerning  what  the  students  wish  others  understood.  Table  2  lists  the  categories  elicited  in  both  cases.  Difficult  Lives  The  following  excerpts  about  what  is  "difficult"  are  representative  and  particularly  eloquent.  The  first  is  from  Sondra,  a  14-­‐year-­‐old  ninth-­‐grader,  a  grim  achiever  in  spite  of  frequent  moves  from  town  to  town,  several  marriages  for  both  parents,  and  no  immediate  or  extended  family  for  support.  Various  groups  of  former  step-­‐siblings  were  scattered  throughout  the  school  system.  She  recognized  her  ability  to  
  • 5. persevere  and  had  learned  how  to  make  friends  quickly,  but  she  wished  they  understood  "that  Im  not  trying  to  act  superior  or  be  a  smartbutt  when  theyll  do  really  stupid  stuff,  and  I  say  something."  She  had  many  domestic  responsibilities  that  "dont  get  done  unless  I  do  them."  She  had  become  more  and  more  overtly  angry  and  "tough"  during  the  past  year.  Having  no  family  vehicle  precluded  both  her  finishing  Drivers  Education  and  her  participating  in  evening  music  events  at  school,  the  latter  resulting  in  poor  music  grades.  She,  therefore,  had  dropped  chorus  and  band  in  order  to  protect  grades  for  future  scholarships,  her  only  hope  for  college,  she  felt.  Math  had  become  more  difficult,  and,  though  she  had  scored  at  the  99th  percentile  in  math  problems  on  the  ITBS  in  grade  7,  she  was  having  doubts  that  she  would  reach  her  goals.  Her  sense  of  her  own  ability,  which  had  previously  sustained  her,  was  now  tenuous  (see  Dweck,  1986,  regarding  the  significance  of  perceptions  of  ability  in  the  face  of  academic  challenges).  In  high  school,  she  missed  the  support  her  middle  school  teachers  had  given  her.  She  felt  sad,  lonely,  desperate,  and  fragile.  She  dreaded  the  upcoming  summer.  In  the  following  excerpts,  she  explains  the  difficulties:  My  mom  and  dad  have  been  in  and  out  of  the  house  so  many  times-­‐-­‐from  the  time  I  was  2,  a  messed-­‐up  home  life.  I  live  with  my  dad  for  a  while,  then  hes  gone.  My  moms  not  real  dependable,  flutters  in  and  out,  cant  hold  a  job.  Neither  of  them  wants  to  watch  us  that  bad.  He  wants  us  to  leave.  The  next  minute  he  just  wants  a  maid-­‐-­‐to  make  him  look  good,  keep  the  house  clean.  Ive  always  lived  with  it,  but  going  over  to  friends  houses  I  found  out  we  were  not  normal.  That  hit  me  last  year.  Just  took  it  in  stride  before  that.  I  cant  really  trust  my  dad.  He  tells  us  mom  doesnt  want  us  to  live  with  her  either.  He  cant  see  to  our  needs,  cant  tell  that  if  theres  no  food  left  in  refrig,  its  time  to  go  shopping.  We  need  a  car  to  get  places.  He  doesnt  have  a  license.  My  sisters  the  oldest,  takes  care  of  everyone,  does  a  pretty  good  job.  Lately  shes  having  a  hard  time  of  it,  getting  into  drugs  real  bad.  A  way  to  cope.  I  dont  like  picking  up  the  messes  of  my  dad  and  brother.  Its  not  fair.  The  most  difficult  thing  right  now  is  trying  to  get  a  job  when  theres  no  car  or  phone.  I  dont  really  have  people  to  talk  to.  I  dont  want  to  be  "poor  me."  My  dad  does  that  kind  of"poor-­‐me"  stuff.  Ive  started  noticing  how  immature  he  is.  Acts  like  my  14-­‐year-­‐old  brother.  He  deals  with  things  like  that-­‐just  hide  and  hope  they  go  away.  For  a  while  I  was  having  mega-­‐problems.  Tried  suicide  twice  earlier  this  year  and  went  to  the  mental  health  clinic.  That  basically  kind  of  took  care  of  it.  I  couldnt  talk  to  my  family.  Theyd  say,  "You  have  nothing  to  complain  about.  My  lifes  so  much  worse."  For  a  while  my  dad  had  another  girlfriend.  She  called  me  names-­‐-­‐even  my  sister  did.  They  all  gang  up  on  me.  I  dont  hang  around  the  house  much.  I  try  to  do  other  activities,  or  I  just  go  to  my  friends  houses.  Its  okay  when  theyre  all  gone,  and  I  can  handle  it  sometimes  when  theyre  there.  Im  in  my  room  all  the  time.  The  hardest  thing  is  that  Im  not  wanted.  If  I  were  off  by  myself  somehow,  Id  feel  better  about  myself.  My  dad  sees  a  chance  for  better  things  in  me.  Hes  really  intelligent,  had  a  chance  before  and  blew  it.  Id  like  to  tell  my  siblings,  "Im  sorry  Im  not  like  you.  Im  sorry  Dad  likes  me.  I  wish  he  didnt."  The  following  is  from  Kris,  a  seventh-­‐grader,  eager  to  talk,  invalidated  at  home  for  her  feelings,  and  wanting  counseling  for  frightening  sadness:  My  parents  divorce  when  I  was  in  third  grade  taught  me  that  things  dont  always  last.  Even  when  you  think  things  are  going  to  go  right,  they  dont  most  of  the  time.  I  learned  not  to  trust  anyone,  cause  sometimes  my  mom  would  tell  us  she  would  be  having  us  some  weekend,  and  then  shed  take  off  with  her  boyfriend.  We  were  freaking  out  last  week  when  we  called  work  and  she  wasnt  there.  We  thought  shed  left.  We  were  supposed  to  be  with  her  last  weekend.  We  get  scared  when  we  dont  know  where  my  dad  is,  too.  I  think  somethings  happened  to  him.  One  night  he  was  out  late,  and  we  thought  hed  been  hit,  like  a  car  accident,  or  shot.  When  my  parents  first  got  a  divorce,  I  had  to  live  with  my  dad.  He  never  talked  to  us,  and  he  didnt  know  how  to  cook.  When  my  mom  first  moved  out,  she  always  acted  as  if  she  was  coming  back,  and  me  and  my  sister  would  get  all  happy,  but  then  she  finally  never  came  back.  If  we  had  lived  with  mom,  I  wouldnt  be  
  • 6. so  confused.  If  I  hadnt  lived  with  my  dad,  though,  I  wouldnt  know  how  to  take  care  of  myself  so  well.  Me  and  my  sister  have  to  cook  our  own  supper  a  lot.  If  your  parents  get  messed  up  or  something,  you  want  to  go  into  your  room  and  just  cry.  You  dont  know  what  to  do  with  your  life.  Sometimes  you  even  think  of  killing  yourself.  Thats  when  its  really  bad  with  your  family,  but  I  think  it  would  happen  mostly  for  me  in  the  winter  cause  I  cant  get  out  of  the  house.  I  never  got  to  go  to  counseling.  My  dad  wouldnt  sign  the  papers.  My  sister  said  she  wanted  to  live  with  mom,  and  so  he  cancelled  the  appointment.  My  dad  doesnt  believe  anything  is  wrong,  even  if  I  tell  him  that  Im  depressed.  He  says,  "Its  all  in  your  head.  Youve  been  watching  too  much  TV."  My  sister  always  thinks  things  that  go  wrong  are  our  fault.  Im  going  to  swim  this  summer.  Keeps  me  out  of  the  house  till  8:00.  Brandy,  a  lonely  sixth-­‐grader,  sensitive  about  "being  different"  both  intellectually  and  socioeconomically,  reported  the  following:  I  write  letters  to  penpals  from  the  back  of  comic  books.  I  feel  kinda  like  is  there  something  wrong  with  me,  am  I  doing  something  wrong?  Dad  said  "Dumb  it  up  a  little."  My  mom  says,  "No."  When  I  was  little,  I  didnt  get  to  hang  around  kids  my  age,  so  I  have  a  sense  of  humor  thats  more  like  people  older  than  me.  I  really  miss  [former  city,  state].  I  used  to  have  a  friend  like  me  there.  My  mom  and  dad  work  at  different  times.  When  we  plan  something  for  the  next  weekend,  we  never  do  it.  Tiffany,  an  anxious  seventh-­‐grader,  who  perceived  that  she  was  "harder  and  tougher"  than  the  previous  year,  was  one  of  several  who  wished  for  more  contact  with  parents:  "I  try  my  hardest  for  them.  I  wish  they  were  there  more."  Amy,  an  angry,  physically  mature  sixth-­‐grader,  recalled  loss  of  contact:  "My  parents  got  divorced  [when  I  was  in]  fourth  grade.  When  I  was  moving  in  with  my  grandma,  I  didnt  know  anything  about  it,  and  I  just  left  and  said  goodbye  to  my  dad.  I  was  wondering  what  was  going  on."  Several  mentioned  anger,  hurt,  worry,  and  sadness  over  their  parents  drinking.  Sixth-­‐grader  Jessica,  with  a  flat  affect,  said,  "When  I  tell  my  friends  about  my  feelings,  they  dont  understand.  They  dont  live  like  I  do."  She  expressed  a  need  to  be  comforted:  "My  sister  doesnt  want  to  give  me  a  hug  when  I  feel  bad.  She  just  says,  `youll  get  over  it."  Eighth-­‐grader  Robin  reported,  "My  stepmom-­‐-­‐we  dont  know  where  she  is.  They  put  her  in  a  dry-­‐out  place.  Shell  go  out  drinking  and  not  tell  us  where  shes  going."  Articulate,  introspective  Chad,  an  eighth-­‐grader,  had  been  kidnapped  by  his  father,  starved,  and  locked  in  a  closet  for  control.  Now  he  lived  with  his  mother:  My  mom  is  overprotective  because  of  certain  things  that  happened  in  the  past.  Wont  let  me  grow  up.  She  has  a  problem  with  trusting-­‐-­‐partially  my  fault  because  when  I  came  back  there  was  a  lot  of  thievery  and  lying  because  thats  what  Id  had  to  do  to  survive.  It  seems  to  be  when  somebody  hurts  [a  child],  its  not  the  child  who  changes,  but  its  the  parents.  Living  with  my  father-­‐-­‐abuse,  starvation.  Its  easy  to  identify  what  was  the  problem  there.  But  living  with  my  mother,  theres  something  wrong,  but  I  cant  quite  figure  out  what  it  is.  Two  extremes.  Shell  love  you  to  death,  and  hell  beat  you  to  death.  Shell  smother  me,  and  he  didnt  care  as  long  as  I  was  there  to  do  chores.  There  were  intense  concerns  about  siblings:  (Robin)  "My  brother  is  a  manic-­‐depressive,  tried  to  commit  suicide  three  times.  I  think  about  that  a  lot";  (Tiffany)  "My  little  sister-­‐-­‐I  dont  want  her  to  grow  up  like  me.  I  want  her  to  have  a  better  life";  (Tiffany)  "The  reason  I  tell  [on  my  big  sister]  is  because  I  care  about  her."  There  were  problems  with  impulsivity.  Amy  reported  the  following:  What  is  unpredictable?  Me  and  my  boyfriend-­‐-­‐behavior  on  a  date,  sexually.  And  when  my  friends  want  me  to  skip  class  or  something,  I  always  do.  Im  surprised  when  it  happens.  I  think  of  the  consequences  with  my  mom  and  with  my  friends,  and  then  I  usually  just  go.  Just  go.  Sometimes  after  I  do  something  bad,  
  • 7. I  regret  what  I  did.  Like  I  once  passed  out  on  purpose  [from  a  "rocket  ride"],  and  I  had  a  really  bad  headache,  coughing  up  blood.  Familiarity  With  a  Dangerous  World  These  students  were  familiar  with  danger,  violence,  and  dramatic  events.  Sixth-­‐grader  Brad,  with  a  history  of  behavior  problems  at  school,  articulated  the  following:  I  was  over  at  a  friends  house,  and  we  were  messing  around,  and  he  was  digging  through  his  dads  stuff,  and  he  found  three  guns,  a  9  mm,  a  .357,  and  a  .380,  and  he  took  the  9  mm  and  pointed  it  at  my  friend  at  his  head  and  said,  "You  dare  me  to  pull  the  trigger?"  I  said,  "No,  you  better  not,"  and  he  pointed  it  at  the  ceiling  and  pulled  the  trigger,  and  it  went  off.  My  brother  has  a  severe  drinking  problem.  He  had  a  CDO  class  A-­‐-­‐such  a  good  license  [transporting  chemicals].  Got  caught  drinking.  In  the  penitentiary  for  two  years.  One  little  spark  and  the  semi  and  half  the  road  is  gone.  The  exhaust  comes  out  of  the  front  of  the  truck  so  if  a  spark  shoots  out,  it  wont  blow.  Ive  met  challenging  stuff,  but  nothing  that  I  cant  deal  with.  Brandy  told  of  these  incidents:  Once  someone  was  beating  me  up  in  the  bathroom.  It  has  to  do  with  a  family  member.  I  was  really  little.  They  held  me  down  and  put  their  hand  over  my  mouth.  I  was  scared.  I  kicked  one  of  them.  I  ran  out.  I  was  glad  my  brother  was  there.  Almost  the  same  thing  happened  to  me  and  my  sister.  She  said,  "When  we  get  to  the  white  van,  were  going  to  run."  And  so  we  did.  Subdued,  unassertive  Jessica,  who  said  that  she  had  now  stopped  smoking  and  that  "drugs-­‐theyre  around  me  all  the  time,"  shared  these  situations  separately  during  the  interview:  My  sister  took  me  to  [a  larger  city]  with  her  and  her  friends.  They  were  pressuring  her  to  shoot  out  a  car  window.  I  told  her  no,  and  she  never  did,  and  she  thanked  me.  One  of  them  did,  and  they  ended  up  being  shot.  One  of  my  friends-­‐-­‐he  broke  out  of  the  boys  home  and  stole  a  car.  My  dad  has  a  lot  of  tickets  for  driving  with  possession.  He  drinks  a  lot.  Hes  losing  his  job.  Some  of  my  friends  have  tried  to  kill  themselves.  Robin  spoke  of  "my  brothers  suicide  attempts"  and  reported  that  she  was  uncomfortable  in  school  "when  my  dad  smacked  me  and  I  had  to  come  to  school  with  a  bruise  on  my  face-­‐-­‐this  year."  Kris  said,  "My  dad  used  to  hit  us.  I  said  it  was  against  the  law.  He  said  Id  been  watching  too  much  TV,  but  then  he  stopped.  When  he  was  a  kid,  he  was  abused."  Tiffany  recognized  that  her  friends  presented  danger  for  her:  "I  have  pretty  bad  friends.  If  they  get  in  deep  trouble,  Ill  go  down  with  them."  Their  Perceived  Strengths  Brad  found  schoolwork  difficult,  perhaps  because  of  his  learning  style  or  his  unusual  mental  processing:  "Everyone  else  learns  quicker  than  me.  Mr.  S.  has  ways  of  doing  it,  and  I  have  ways  of  doing  it  that  arent  his  ways.  They  seem  hard  to  him,  but  they  seem  easy  to  me.  Its  a  different  way  of  doing  things."  He  was  proud  of  his  abilities:  Im  good  at  making  dangerous  things.  I  fixed  our  VCR.  Tore  it  apart  and  put  it  back  together.  I  can  change  oil  in  a  car-­‐mechanical  things.  I  like  target-­‐practice,  can  hit  anything  that  flies  in  front  of  me.  I  can  take  a  pellet  gun  in  my  room,  set  a  bolt  at  one  end,  and  I  can  hit  it.  No  holes  in  the  wall  where  Ive  missed-­‐-­‐not  yet,  anyway.  Im  proud  because  I  make  the  right  decisions  in  a  bad  situation,  and  I  can  get  where  I  need  to  be  to  avoid  the  situation  and  get  it  under  control.  
  • 8. Sondra  appreciated  "just  sticking  up  for  myself,  fighting  back.  I  wont  just  stand  there  and  take  it  all.  I  basically  really  noticed  that  this  year.  Other  people-­‐-­‐they  just  get  knocked  over.  Im  proud  of  the  fact  that  I  want  to  change-­‐-­‐that  I  will  hopefully  do  something."  She  tried  not  to  live  in  the  past:  "When  you  look  back,  thats  when  you  get  the  bad  feelings,  so  you  just  look  ahead.  Thats  one  of  the  reasons  I  am  the  way  I  am:  Ive  had  those  people  in  my  life  and  Ive  been  able  to  say,  like  about  drugs  and  alcohol,  thats  not  for  me."  Robin  spoke  of  "always  being  able  to  think  about  something  good,  even  when  somethings  going  bad."  Tiffany  said  she  tried  to  "look  on  the  bright  days  when  I  have  difficult  times."  Kris  appreciated  her  "confidence  in  myself,  because  I  know  that  I  can  stand  up  to  my  dad.  When  I  go  and  talk  to  my  dad,  I  can  have  a  conversation  with  him,  or  if  an  argument,  I  dont  walk  off."  She  also  spoke  of  another  asset:  Eagerness-­‐-­‐about  going  with  my  mom  for  a  weekend  and  getting  away  from  my  dad.  Actually  Im  kind  of  glad  theyre  divorced,  because  I  have  another  place  to  go  if  something  goes  wrong.  If  I  get  in  a  fight  with  my  dad,  I  know  that  in  just  a  couple  of  days  Ill  be  with  my  mom  and  can  get  a  break.  She  exuded  a  "tough"  confidence:  My  ability  to  not  do  what  everybody  wants  me  to  do.  I  know  the  difference  between  right  and  wrong.  Its  just  that  sometimes  the  right  is  boring.  But  other  people  dont  make  my  decisions  for  me.  If  Im  going  to  do  something,  Ill  do  it-­‐-­‐like  goals,  or  if  I  cant  make  my  goal,  I  try.  She  was  proud  of  her  accomplishments:  In  third  grade,  I  was  one  of  the  only  ones  who  got  100%  in  the  English  part  of  some  big  test.  There  were  only  two  of  us.  Mr.  K.  also  said  I  was  one  of  the  best  swimmers.  Kind  of  good  to  know  youre  better  than  most.  Sounds  like  a  selfish  thought,  but  its  nice  to  know  youre  good  at  something.  I  know  how  to  cook.  If  I  didnt,  we  wouldnt  have  supper  half  the  time.  Brandy  was  proud  of  her  ability  to  joke  about  herself  and  being  able  to  "be  okay-­‐-­‐even  when  somebody  does  something."  Artistic  ability  helped  two  students  cope.  Brandy  discussed  her  talents:  Drawing  and  writing.  I  have  nine  characters.  Most  are  girls,  and  they  each  have  a  part  of  me  in  them.  I  also  write  songs.  And  I  have  a  big  vocabulary.  During  when  we  dress  up  for  a  60s  week,  teachers  get  a  kick  out  of  my  clothes.  I  wore  a  sign  "Ban  the  Bomb."  And  politics.  I  changed  some  of  the  Republican  girls  to  Democrats.  Ive  found  out  that  its  okay  to  be  me  even  if  nobody  likes  me.  Im  me  and  I  cant  change  that.  Chad  also  mentioned  his  skills  in  art:  "I  like  to  do  art.  Its  basically  a  stress  reliever.  I  can  do  whatever  I  want  with  it-­‐-­‐an  create  beautiful  things.  Most  people  cant  do  that."  Several  students  mentioned  their  mental  ability  as  a  valued  strength,  but  no  one  used  the  word  "intelligent."  Jessica,  Tiffany,  Marci  (the  sixthgrader  who  did  not  elaborate  in  her  answers),  and  Matt  (a  sixth-­‐grader  on  growth  hormones  that  "make  me  rambunctious")  all  mentioned  getting  good  grades  in  certain  classes  and  receiving  a  classroom  award  for  good  work.  Other  comments  about  using  intelligence  are  these:  (Jessica)  I  use  my  mind  about  things.  (Robin)  Wanting  to  learn  more  about  things.  Ive  always  wanted  to  do  that.  (Chad,  after  explaining  how  he  had  survived  during  his  kidnapping)  I  appreciate  my  ability  to  learn,  my  mental  capabilities.  Most  people  wouldnt  believe  my  high  IQ.  If  I  were  to  give  myself  completely  away,  it  
  • 9. would  expose  myself.  I  like  to  keep  myself  pretty  much  a  surprise  to  people,  so  I  have  the  advantage.  I  did  that  with  my  dad.  (Tiffany)  My  brain-­‐-­‐I  build  my  confidence  in  my  brain.  It  has  all  my  school  stuff.  Whatever  I  learn  pretty  much  sticks  there.  It  holds  my  memories.  I  can  always  look  back  on  them.  Some  mentioned  the  fact  that  they  did  not  "do  drugs"  as  a  strength:  (Jessica)  "Im  not  a  troublemaker";  (Robin)  "Not  being  like  some  people  in  our  school  violent,  thinking  about  sex  and  drugs  and  stuff."  Jessica  and  Robin  noted  their  ability  to  make  and  keep  friends,  and  Chad  said,  "my  humor."  Jessica  and  Robin  cited  their  siblings  as  a  strength:  "They  care  about  me."  Robin  cited  family  counseling  as  a  strength:  "Moms  starting  to  talk  to  me.  They  wanted  things  to  be  okay  with  me  and  my  mom."  Chad  discussed  his  strengths,  one  of  which  was  his  mothers  nurturing  after  his  absence:  I  could  lie  lickity  split  if  I  needed  food.  Those  three  years  taught  me  more  skills  than  anything  else  can  teach  me.  Im  proud,  when  I  look  back.  I  can  see  my  extreme  ability  to  survive  and  cope  with  things.  When  I  came  back  to  live  with  my  mom,  she  taught  me  about  loving  and  sharing.  I  was  uncontrollable.  She  put  up  with  it.  Most  parents  would  have  given  up.  Manipulate-­‐-­‐I  could  do  that  to  survive.  That  was  kind  of  a  curse,  when  I  came  back.  I  couldnt  help  playing  it.  My  mom  would  get  mad.  It  doesnt  work  if  you  dont  need  it.  The  strengths  discussed  by  the  students  are  summarized  in  Table  3.  Visions  of  the  Future  The  students  visions  of  the  future  ranged  from  extreme  optimism  ("a  lot  of  happiness")  to  cautious  hope  ("Maybe  life  will  be  just  a  little  bit  better";  "Hopefully  Ill  get  a  job  and  be  able  to  support  myself.  You  never  know.  You  just  hope")  to  pessimism  ("I  want  to  be  all  sorts  of  things,  but  Ill  probably  not  get  to  do  even  one  of  them").  Futuristic  scenarios  varied  from  modest  ("be  better  friends  with  my  parents";  "just  me  in  my  little  house";  "learn  from  my  mistakes,  and  not  make  so  many  of  them";  "the  house  will  look  nice  on  the  outside-­‐-­‐so  many  around  here  are  trashy")  to  grand  ("make  lots  of  money";  "I  want  a  big  house  and  kids  and  be  a  lawyer";  "A  scientist-­‐-­‐go  to  college.  Astronomy,  thats  my  favorite").  Chad  expressed  this  vision  of  his  future:  Id  like  to  make  myself  remembered-­‐home-­‐town  famous.  I  want  to  prove  something  to  myself.  I  plan  on  being  able  to  come  into  a  place,  find  a  goal,  spend  three  years  trying  to  accomplish  it,  and  always  bounce  back  from  what  happens  to  me.  I  want  just  for  an  hour  to  sit  back  and  look  at  my  life  and  be  satisfied  with  it  and  just  sort  of  chuckle  about  what  Ive  been  through.  Marci  said  she  would  not  like  to  have  children,  and  Tiffany,  Sondra,  and  Marci  doubted  that  they  would  want  to  marry.  Matt,  Chad,  Brad,  and  Brandy  did  not  mention  either  marriage  or  children  when  asked  to  describe  their  lives  15  years  into  the  future.  Robin  could  not  think  of  any  answer  at  all  to  the  question  about  the  future.  Some  visions  of  the  future  were  scattered  and  unfocused,  not  atypical  of  early  middleschool  children,  but  here,  perhaps,  reflecting  lack  of  guidance  about  education  beyond  high  school.  The  comments  of  two  students  reflect  this:  (Brad)  I  want  to  go  to  college.  I  want  to  try  to  get  into  Harvard  or  at  least  in  the  police  academy.  Thats  cool.  Maybe  the  Army,  maybe  about  five  years.  Or  a  doctor  or  a  person  who  builds  computers.  Spelling  I  still  have  trouble  with-­‐-­‐I  dont  get  the  silent  letters  in  there.  I  hate  studying.  I  dont  want  to  get  held  back.  If  I  try  my  hardest,  I  end  up  with  headaches.  I  want  to  get  out  of  sixth  grade.  (Amy)  Sometimes  I  want  to  be  a  doctor,  and  then  sometimes  if  I  see  something  in  a  movie,  I  have  a  sudden  urge  to  work  on  computers  because  it  looks  cool.  I  like  to  sing  a  lot.  I  like  to  dance.  Im  not  too  
  • 10. serious  about  a  career.  Probably  when  Im  older-­‐-­‐in  high  school.  Ill  be  with  a  family.  I  want  a  kid,  yeah.  In  a  trailer  or  a  house,  not  junky,  in  California  or  Jamaica.  I  heard  Jamaica  is  cool.  There  was  anxiety  and  personal  uncertainty  about  the  future  for  some:  (Amy)  I  dont  know  if  Ill  get  into  drugs.  If  someone  pressures  me  to  do  something  bad,  I  never  know  what  Ill  say.  (Chad)  Unpredictable-­‐-­‐where  Im  going,  how  Im  going,  if  Ill  make  it,  wondering  what  Im  going  to  end  up  like-­‐-­‐like  my  father.  Will  the  abusiveness  pass  on?  I  dont  want  to  be  like  my  relatives  on  that  side.  Theyre  psychopathic.  Sexual  orientation  was  an  issue  for  Brandy,  as  she  envisioned  her  future:  "Im  not  really  gay  or  straight  right  now.  I  know  myself  a  lot.  Ive  never  thought  anybody  was  cute.  My  dad  is  homophobic.  He  thinks  anybody  without  a  boyfriend  is  gay,  that  all  musicians  must  be  devil-­‐worshippers  or  gay."  Sondra  knew  that  she  would  jeopardize  her  future  if  she  would  "drop  out  like  my  sister,  or  be  sent  away  like  my  brother  or  get  too  caught  up  in  other  things  that  arent  really  important."  She  thought  that  working  for  the  Army  might  be  a  good  goal.  Kris  said,  "I  wont  have  kids  so  early."  What  Educators  Should  Understand  These  students  wanted  guidance  from  teachers-­‐-­‐perhaps  "parental"  guidance.  Jessica  wanted  teachers  to  "tell  you  not  to  do  something  if  theyve  already  done  it-­‐-­‐how  it  ruins  your  friendships  with  other  people  and  stuff."  Matt  said,  "Tell  me  whats  right  and  wrong;  tell  me  what  to  do  and  what  not  to  do."  In  addition,  Tiffany  said  teachers  can  "support  me,  encourage  me,  praise  me  when  I  do  something  right,  notice  things  I  do  wrong  and  help  me  correct  them.  Just  to  be  there  for  me  when  I  need  it."  Kris  said,  "I  was  going  to  fight  this  girl  at  school  and  [teachers]  would  talk  to  me  about  that,  and  you  get  uncomfortable  about  it."  What  would  they  like  teachers  to  understand?  Kris  explained  as  follows:  I  wish  teachers  would  understand  my  life  at  home.  Youll  come  to  school  and  wont  have  an  assignment  done,  and  you  try  to  explain  that  maybe  something  went  on  at  home.  What  if  your  mom  and  dad  got  in  this  big  fight  and  you  didnt  know  what  to  do.  If  I  told  them  that,  they  wouldnt  care,  so  I  dont  tell  them-­‐-­‐even  if  its  a  good  excuse.  Brad,  skilled  with  "dangerous  things,"  said,  "I  dont  like  to  be  yelled  at.  This  one  teacher  blows  up  if  you  dont  learn  quick  enough.  Sometimes  Id  like  to  just  punch  him.  I  have  a  short  fuse."  Kris  said  this:  I  wish  theyd  not  punish  me  for  every  little  single  mistake.  Thats  what  some  teachers  do,  and  so  you  feel  like  not  doing  anything,  because  youll  get  into  trouble.  Like  if  you  pick  up  a  pencil  someone  else  drops,  or  just  turning  around  gets  you  detention  ...  just  stupid  little  things  like  that.  You  shouldnt  get  in  trouble  for  little  things  like  that.  Brandy,  distressed  by  many  elements  of  her  life,  said,  "Id  like  teachers  to  understand  that  it  sometimes  looks  like  Im  not  listening  or  not  trying  hard  enough,  but  I  am."  Chad  said,  "Knowing  my  ADHD  and  knowing  my  personality  would  help  a  lot  of  people  understand  me."  Jessica  advised  quietly  that  teachers  should  understand  that  the  most  uncomfortable  things  in  school  "have  to  do  with  boys."  The  following  was  Amys  response:  I  wish  theyd  understand  why  I  do  some  of  the  bad  stuff  skip,  do  drugs.  Sometimes  I  know  I  shouldnt,  and  sometimes  I  just  want  to-­‐-­‐just  to  be  rebellious.  That  Im  not  really  all  that  bad.  They  think  Im  all  bad.  I  do  drugs,  but  thats  none  of  their  business.  That  they  can  help  me  if  I  have  a  question  in  classes-­‐-­‐cause  they  never  do.  Every  time  I  need  help,  they  say,  "You  havent  been  listening."  
  • 11. Robin  said,  "They  pretty  much  understand  most  of  the  stuff  thats  going  on  in  my  life.  Thats  okay-­‐-­‐with  most  of  them."  Later,  she  said,  "I  wish  they  wouldnt  look  down  on  people  like  me,  who  sometimes  get  confused,  so  instead  of  asking  for  help,  dont  do  the  assignment  or  do  the  test  well."  Chad  said  this:  Whats  hard?  Uncomfortable?  When  Im  approached  by  teacher  or  counselor  and  they  act  either  too  buddy-­‐buddy  or  dont  bug  me  at  all.  Dealing  with  peers  who  have  no  idea  what  Ive  been  through  and  think  life  is  a  joke.  I  feel  aggression  toward  them  that  shouldnt  be  there.  I  cant  join  them  but  cant  repel  them,  and  Im  stuck  somewhere  in  the  middle.  Amy  asked  herself,  "The  nicest  thing  in  school?"  Then  she  paused.  "Nothing,  really."  The  following  comments  from  Sondra  reflect  the  kind  of  discomfort  that  children  from  nonmainstream  cultures,  including  low  socioeconomic  contexts,  may  feel  in  middle-­‐class-­‐oriented  gifted  programs.  She  herself  had  five  ITBS  scores  at  or  above  the  96th  percentile,  but  that  did  not  compensate  for  what  happened  socially:  Student  council.  I  was  in  it  this  year.  Ten  people  were  elected  out  of  the  20  running-­‐out  of  500  kids.  But  I  dropped  out  because  the  people  were  the  rich  kids  and  they  looked  down  on  me.  So  they  ignored  me.  And  we  had  little  groups  for  planning  things.  Id  sign  up  for  one  and  Id  just  sit  there.  Even  if  I  gave  my  ideas,  theyd  just  blow  them  off,  so  I  said  okay,  fine.  Robin  underscored  the  importance  of  affirming  ability.  In  spite  of  her  96th  percentile  in  reading  comprehension  on  an  earlier  ITBS,  she  reported  that  she  did  not  see  herself  as  having  high  ability:  "I  was  never  told  I  had  a  good  mind.  They  never  let  me  go  ahead  into  those  kinds  of  classes."  In  addition,  cautious  and  protective  parents  might  not  encourage  participation  in  special  programs.  Chad  explained:  Like  TAG.  They  needed  $17,  and  she  wouldnt  pay  it.  My  mom  says,  "Youre  so  smart."  She  thinks  that  Im  smart  enough  to  do  work  at  home,  but  not  smart  enough  to  take  harder  classes.  I  couldve  skipped  kindergarten,  but  she  wouldnt  let  me.  I  already  knew  addition  and  subtraction.  She  wont  let  me  use  my  abilities.  Robin  spoke  appreciatively  about  caring  teachers:  "My  teacher-­‐-­‐he  cares  about  me.  I  appreciate  having  a  teacher  that  forgives  me  even  when  I  dont  do  something  just  like  he  asked,  having  somebody  to  talk  to  about  things  other  than  schoolwork."  Sondra  echoed  those  thoughts:  "[Teachers  and  counselors]  helped  me  out.  I  can  think  of  many  faces.  Theyve  helped  me  out.  I  forget  the  names,  but  there  have  been  a  lot."  Tiffany  said,  "Having  all  my  teachers  remembering  me-­‐thats  nice."  The  stress  in  their  lives  can  contribute  to  absenteeism,  according  to  Sondra:  "Im  not  really  in  school  much.  Ive  missed  a  lot  this  year.  The  strain.  Id  be  sick  a  lot."  She  also  explained,  considering  the  relevance  of  the  classroom  to  her  life,  "My  classes-­‐-­‐some  things  dont  seem  important.  What  were  doing."  Discussion  Their  responses  point  to  a  range  of  school-­‐comfort  levels  for  these  students,  from  Amys  "nothing,  really  [is  nice]"  to  two  students  being  aware  of  socioeconomic  differences,  to  three  students  indicating  that  school  was  a  place  of  stability  and  nurturance.  Some  chafed  under  the  structure  of  the  system,  some  felt  misunderstood,  and  two  cited  problems  with  peers,  but  the  majority  listed  school  personnel  as  significant,  supportive  adults  in  their  lives,  and  a  few  men  tioned  moments  of  achievement.  In  regard  to  resilience,  optimism  may  be  warranted  for  most  of  these  participants,  given  the  evidence  of  strong  support  from  at  least  one  significant  person  in  their  lives.  Five  of  the  11  participants  indicated  that  teachers,  counselors,  or  both  had  offered  crucial,  valued  support.  The  death  of  a  grandparent  had  been  particularly  difficult  for  Robin  and  Tiffany,  since  that  individual  had  played  a  significant  supportive  role  in  their  lives.  (Amy  was  living  with  a  grandparent,  but  unhappily,  preferring  to  live  with  her  father.)  Older  
  • 12. siblings  provided  "parenting"  for  Brad,  Jessica,  and,  to  some  extent,  Brandy.  Sondra  might  not  be  typical  in  her  reluctance  to  lean  on  others  for  assistance:  "Its  hard  for  me  to  ask  for  help.  Its  like  its  my  problem."  She  was  the  only  one  who  indicated  that  she  "had  no  one  to  talk  to,"  but  she,  at  least,  had  the  wishes  of  her  father  that  she  could  "have  a  better  life."  A  message  to  educators,  including  those  working  with  high-­‐ability  students,  is  that  a  teacher  may  play  a  crucial  mentor  or  parent-­‐surrogate  role  for  an  at-­‐risk  child,  no  matter  how  distancing  and  intimidating  their  behavior  is  prior  to  establishing  comfortable  rapport.  Only  three  students  spoke  of  stable,  comfortable  communication  with  a  parent.  However,  no  matter  how  conflictual  the  relationship,  their  parents  were  central  to  their  lives  and  were  frequently  mentioned  during  the  interviews.  Most  participants  made  clear  statements  about  wanting  positive  parental  attention.  If  a  positive  view  of  the  future  contributes  to  resilience,  then  seven  of  the  participants  have  another  reason  to  be  hopeful.  All  except  Brandy,  Sondra,  Robin,  and  Jessica  spoke  fairly  confidently  about  going  to  college,  having  a  career,  and  having  a  better  life.  However,  two  of  the  participants,  Robin  and  Jessica,  with  low-­‐energy  responses,  had  difficulty  picturing  any  future.  Sondra  had  difficulty  sustaining  focus  on  anything  beyond  arranging  for  the  school  districts  "Independent  Living"  program,  which  included  living  in  a  supervised  residence  after  age  16.  Brad  spoke  of  post-­‐highschool  education,  but  quickly  reverted  to  thoughts  of  going  camping  with  his  older  siblings.  However,  they  all  had  exhibited  assertiveness  and  autonomy  regarding  meeting  their  needs  in  the  past.  Kris,  Sondra,  Chad,  and  Tiffany  had  all  behaved  proactively  in  coping  with  their  situations.  That  all  participants  were  articulate,  perceptive,  insightful,  and  self-­‐reflective  also  bodes  well  for  the  future,  according  to  the  literature  regarding  resilience.  Perhaps  by  using  their  high  ability,  most  appeared  to  have  "made  sense"  of  their  circumstances,  whether  or  not  they  accepted  their  situations  or  forgave  the  adults  in  their  lives.  Mental  ability  was  cited  by  several  as  "appreciated,"  but  high  ability  did  not  mean  that  classes  and  academic  achievement  were  discussed  much  in  response  to  the  interview  questions.  In  fact,  comments  that  pertained  to  the  classroom  were  rare.  Kris,  for  example,  with  one  of  the  highest  percentile  rankings  on  the  ITBS,  never  mentioned  anything  about  grades  or  classroom  academic  work.  Neither  did  five  others.  Sondra  communicated  great  concern  for  academic  achievement,  but  she  was  losing  confidence  in  her  academic  ability.  She  and  Robin  had  trouble  with  math.  Students  with  difficult  home  situations,  and  with  little  or  no  parental  support  for  academic  work,  may  find  the  hurdles  of  new  math  concepts  and  other  academic  challenges  late  in  middle  school  particularly  formidable.  What  Gifted  Education  Can  Do  We  know  relatively  little  about  high-­‐ability  children  who,  like  those  in  this  study,  do  not  fit  the  images  that  researchers  in  gifted  education  may  have  in  mind  when  they  select  samples  and  generalize  findings.  These  students,  from  various  backgrounds  and  representing  many  risk  factors,  may  never  be  referred  for  special  programs  or  activities  for  those  with  high  ability.  Then,  too,  they  may  choose  not  to  participate  if  identified  or  drop  out  of  a  program  because  of  poor  fit  in  a  one-­‐size-­‐for-­‐everyone  curriculum  designed  to  be  "more  and  faster"  for  highly  motivated,  advantaged  students.  Educators  are  unlikely  to  pursue  them  and  make  accommodations  if  the  students  are  not  eager  to  be  involved.  Some  of  the  at-­‐risk  participants  here  had  done  reasonably  good  academic  work  earlier  in  school,  despite  significant  family  disruptions.  That  scholastic  data,  together  with  high  composite  or  subtest  scores  on  standardized  tests,  might  be  found  through  close  scrutiny  of  school  records  (Peterson  &  Colangelo,  1996)  to  justify  inclusion.  In  general,  nontraditional  identification  procedures  are  recommended  for  finding  these  students  and  others  from  underrepresented  groups  (Baldwin,  1984;  Charlesworth,  1979;  Kirschenbaum,  1993;  Ward,  1992).  In  each  case  in  this  study,  a  parent  readily  gave  permission  for  an  interview,  "an  activity  for  high-­‐ability  students,"  suggesting  potential  parental  cooperation  in  involving  at-­‐risk  children.  
  • 13. However,  if  educators  find  and  recommend  these  complex,  challenging  students,  then  gifted  education  needs  to  respond  with  appropriate  programs.  They  need  personal  and  academic  nurturing.  Gifted  programs  need  to  be  flexible  in  meeting  individual  needs-­‐-­‐adjusted  in  format,  content,  emphasis,  and  purpose  in  order  to  affirm  and  nurture  personal  and  academic  strengths  and  to  support  and  strengthen  areas  of  relative  weakness.  Some  degree  of  remediation  may  be  appropriate.  VanTassel-­‐Baska  (1991)  advocated  a  "tryout"  program,  a  low  adult-­‐tochild  ratio,  service  to  families,  communication  with  parents,  mentorships  and  tutorials,  emphasis  on  math  and  reading,  early  intervention  addressing  the  whole  child,  and  programs  addressing  non-­‐cognitive  skills  that  can  enhance  motivation.  The  fact  that  academic  concerns  received  so  little  attention  in  the  interview  responses  in  this  study  does  not  mean  that  inclusive  and  accommodating  programs  should  not  consider  academic  programming.  Several  wished  that  teachers  would  not  assume  that  they  did  not  care  about  classroom  performance,  and  some  overtly  stated  that  they  wanted  meaningful  academic  experiences.  According  to  this  study,  it  is  more  appropriate  to  assume  that  these  students  are  eager  to  learn,  and  that  programs  can  fill  in  "enrichment"  gaps  and  bolster  academic  selfconfidence  through  stimulating  experiences  that  bring  them  into  contact  with  others  with  similar  abilities.  The  interview  responses  underscored  the  importance  of  supportive  mentors,  and  educators  who  are  designated  nurturers  of  high  potential  play  several  crucial  roles  in  these  childrens  lives.  The  students  demonstrated  that  they  were  open  to  guidance  and  hungry  for  it.  To  respond  to  affective  concerns,  involving  them  in  activities  like  small-­‐group  discussion  with  others  with  similar  life  contexts,  with  mainstream,  middleclass  peers,  or  a  combination  of  the  two  can  be  beneficial,  based  on  the  researchers  experience.  Students  from  diverse  backgrounds  find  that  they  have  more  in  common  than  previously  realized,  given  their  common  developmental  tasks  and  concerns.  Small  groups  provide  opportunity  for  building  trust,  contact  with  intellectual  peers,  guidance  from  an  attentive  adult,  and  gaining  information  about  post-­‐high  school  education.  In  the  groups  that  preceded  the  individual  interviews,  the  study  participants  demonstrated  intellectual  agility  in  their  insights,  impressive  survival  strategies,  clever  repartee,  creative  responses  to  situations,  and  descriptive  anecdotes  about  household  management  at  very  young  ages.  Leaders  and  peers  can  provide  positive  feedback  for  these  strengths  and  abilities.  The  "tough  bright"  are  not  part  of  the  collective  consciousness  in  gifted  education.  Educators  often  do  not  know  these  troubled  children  beyond  their  appearance  and  behavior,  for  they  do  not  share  personal  information  readily.  Their  life  experiences  may  not  have  given  them  the  vocabulary,  intellectual  enrichment,  social  experiences,  or  modeling  of  behavior  that  they  need  to  fit  comfortably  into  the  classroom.  They  may,  in  fact,  be  sullen  and  withdrawn,  hostile,  and  sensitive  to  slights-­‐-­‐trained  thoroughly  by  adults  who  disappoint.  They  may  initially  be  difficult  to  work  with.  Research  methodology  intending  to  learn  about  their  needs,  concerns,  constraints,  and  strengths-­‐-­‐and  programs  as  well-­‐-­‐must  be  sensitive  to  these  realities.  Those  who  make  referrals  need  to  be  encouraged  to  look  at  the  "toughest"  at-­‐risk  children  and  adolescents  with  an  assumption  that  one-­‐third  of  them  might  be  "gifted,"  according  to  this  study.  They  represent  critical  personal  and  academic  needs,  and  they  need  and  deserve  the  attention  of  educators  and  researchers  of  the  gifted  as  much  as  do  those  students  whose  parents  advocate  for  them,  provide  opportunities  for  enrichment,  and  nurture  predictably  and  adequately.  Finding  them  and  meeting  their  needs  are  not  easy  tasks,  but  those  are  appropriate  and  urgent  challenges  in  gifted  education.  Table  1                              Themes  in  At-­‐Risk  Study  Participants                                Responses  to  Open-­‐Ended  Questions  
  • 14.        Thematic  Category  (N=11)  Alluding  to  Theme                                                  Number  of  Students    Wishing  to  "Be  Known,"  Appreciating                                                  10      Someones  Concern  Familiar  With  a  Dangerous  World,  Taught                                          10      by  Difficult  Experiences  Accepting  That  Life  is  Unpredictable,  Dramatic                              9  Emotionally  Volatile,  Impulsive                                                            8  Getting  Negative  Feedback  in  School                                                    8  Growing  up  Early                                                                                          8  Self-­‐Reliance,  Strength,  Resilience                                                    8  Unreliable  Parents;  Broken  Promises                                                    7  Unforgiving  of  Parents                                                                              7  Needing,  Appreciating  Someone  to  Talk  With                                      7  Missing  Parent  Contact,  Parent  Affirmation;                                    7      Wanting  Guidance  Uncomfortable  in  School                                                                            6  "Confused"                                                                                                      6  Punished  Severely,  Excessively  Controlled  at  Home                        6  Enmeshed  With  Families;  Greatly  Concerned                                        6      About  Family,  Sibling  Reliant  on  Abilities,  Aware  of  Own  Intelligence                            6  Aware  of  Risks  in  Current  Friendship  Groups                                    6  Hopeful  About  the  Future                                                                          6  Experienced  With  Divorce                                                                          5  Lofty,  Perhaps  Unrealistic  Future  Goals,                                          5      or  No  Long-­‐Term  Goals  Experienced  With  Substances                                                                    5  
  • 15. Non-­‐validation  by  Sibling;  Discomfort  in  Family                            5      Because  of  Ability  Strong  Sense  of"Being  Different"                                                          5  School  Seen  as  Stability                                                                          4  Forgiving  of  Parents                                                                                  4  Creative  in  the  Arts;  Arts  for  Expression,  Coping,  Pride          4  Apprehensive  About  the  Future                                                                3  Distrustful  Regarding  Relationships                                                    3  Bothered  by  Socioeconomic  Differences  in  School                            3  Desiring  Experiences  in  a  Gifted  Program                                          2          Table  2                                        Significant  People  in  the  Lives                                        of  At-­‐Risk  Study  Participants    "The  nicest  people"                                              Number  of  Students  Citing    Teacher(s)                                                                                               7  Grandparent(s)                                                                                     7  Parent(s)                                                                                                 6  Friend                                                                                                       4  Counselor                                                                                                 3  Parent  of  a  friend                                                                         3  Mental  Health  Counselor                                                                   2  Sibling(s)                                                                                               2  People  in  town,  Neighbor                                                                 2  
  • 16. Co-­‐worker  of  a  Parent                                                                       1    "Understand  me"                                                      Number  of  Students  Citing    Teachers                                                                                                   5  Siblings                                                                                                   3  Counselor                                                                                                 3  Parents                                                                                                     2  Peers                                                                                                         2  Dad                                                                                                             1        Table  3    Personal  strengths  cited  by  At-­‐Risk  Study  Participants  in  Response  to  Open-­‐Ended  Question                            Category                                                         Number  of  Students  Citing  intelligence,  "brain,"  memory,  eagerness  to  learn                     5  a  caring  parent  who  listens                                                                     5  a  school  award  for  academic  work  or  talent  area                         5  siblings  who  care                                                                                         4  sticking  up  for  self,  fighting  back                                                   4  humor                                                                                                                   3  creative  arts                                                                                                   3  athletic  ability                                                                                             3  ability  to  look  on  bright  side                                                               3  not  violent,  not  living  dangerously                                                   3  being  able  to  forgive                                                                                 2  being  able  to  make  friends  easily                                                       2  
  • 17. self-­‐reliance,  independence                                                                     2  domestic  skills                                                                                             2  tenacity  and  perseverance                                                                         2  personal  appearance                                                                                     1  family  counseling                                                                                         1  mechanical  ability,  ability  to  make  dangerous  things               1  ability  to  make  wise  decisions  in  bad  situations                       1  ability  to  predict  when  things  will  happen                                     1  having  a  place  to  go  when  things  are  bad  at  home                       1  vocabulary                                                                                                         1  References  Baker,  J.  A.  (1994).  A  study  of  stress  and  psychological  distress  in  academically  talented  adolescents.  In  N.  Colangelo,  S.  G.  Assouline,  &  D.  L.  Ambroson  (Eds.),  Talent  development:  Proceedings  from  the  1993  Henry  B.  and  Jocelyn  Wallace  national  research  symposium  on  talent  development  (pp.  435-­‐438).  Dayton,  OH:  Ohio  Psychology  Press.  Baldwin,  A.  Y.  (1984).  The  Baldwin  identification  matrix  2  for  the  identification  of  the  gifted  and  talented:  A  handbook  for  use.  New  York:  Trillium.  Baldwin,  A.  Y.  (1994).  The  seven  plus  story:  Developing  hidden  talent  among  students  in  socioeconomically  disadvantaged  environments.  Gifted  Child  Quarterly,  38(2),  80-­‐84.  Barrera,  M.,  Chassin,  L.,  &  Rogosch,  E  (1993).  Effects  of  social  support  and  conflict  on  adolescent  children  of  alcoholic  and  nonalcoholic  fathers.  Journal  of  Personality  and  Social  Psychology,  64(4),  602-­‐612.  Beardslee,  M.D.,  &  Podorefsky,  M.  A.  (1988).  Resilient  adolescents  whose  parents  have  serious  affective  and  other  psychiatric  disorders:  Importance  of  self-­‐understanding  and  relationships.  American  Journal  of  Psychiatry,  145,  63-­‐69.  Berlin,  R.,  Davis,  R.  B.,  &  Orenstein,  A.  (1988).  Adaptive  and  reactive  distancing  among  adolescents  from  alcoholic  families.  Adolescence,  23,  577-­‐584.  Bolig,  R.,  &  Weddle,  K.  D.  (1988).  Resiliency  and  hospitalization  of  children.  Childrens  Health  Care,  16,  255-­‐260.  Brooks,  R.  (1980).  Gifted  delinquents.  Educational  Research,  22(3),  212-­‐220.  Charlesworth,  W.  R.  (1979).  An  ethological  approach  to  studying  intelligence.  Human  Development,  22(3),  212-­‐216.  Colangelo,  N.,  &  Kerr,  B.  A.  (1990).  Extreme  academic  talent:  Profiles  of  perfect  scorers.  Journal  of  Educational  Psychology,  82,  404-­‐409.  Colder,  C.  R.,  &  Chassin,  L.  (1993).  The  stress  and  negative  affect  model  of  adolescent  alcohol  use  and  the  moderating  effects  of  behavior  under  control.  Journal  of  Studies  on  Alcohol  54(3),  326-­‐333.  
  • 18. Coleman,  M.  R.,  &  Gallagher,  J.  J.  (1992).  State  policies  for  identification  of  nontraditional  gifted  students.  Gifted  Child  Today,  15(1),  15-­‐17.  Dugan,  T.,  &  Coles,  R.  (Eds.).  (1989).  The  child  in  our  times:  Studies  in  the  development  of  resiliency.  New  York:  Bruner/Mazel.  Dweck,  C.  W.  (1986).  Motivational  processes  affecting  learning.  American  Psychologist,  41,  1040-­‐1048.  Farrell,  M.P.,  Barnes,  G.  M.,  &  Banerjee,  S.  (1995).  Family  cohesion  as  a  buffer  against  the  effects  of  problem-­‐drinking  fathers  on  psychological  distress,  deviant  behavior,  and  heavy  drinking  in  adolescents.  Journal  of  Health  and  Social  Behavior,  36,  377-­‐185.  Garbarino,  J.,  Dubrow,  N.,  Kostelny,  K.,  &  Pardo,  C.  (1992).  Children  in  danger:  Coping  with  the  consequences  of  community  violence.  San  Francisco:  Jossey-­‐Bass.  Gardner,  H.  (1983).  Frames  of  mind.  New  York:  Basic  Books.  Garmezy,  N.,  Masten,  A.  S.,  &  Tellegen,  A.  (1984).  The  study  of  stress  and  competence  in  children:  A  building  block  for  developmental  psychopathology.  Child  Development,  55,  97-­‐111.  Goglia,  L.  R.,  Jurkovic,  G.  J.,  &  Burt,  A.M.  (1992).  Generational  boundary  distortions  by  adult  children  of  alcoholics:  Child-­‐as-­‐parent  and  child-­‐as-­‐mate.  The  American  Journal  of  Family  Therapy,  20,  291-­‐299.  Goldstein,  D.,  Stocking,  V.  B.,  &  Sawyer,  R.  N.  (1992).  The  talented  adolescent:  Data  from  TIPs  first  decade.  In  N.  Colangelo,  S.  G.  Assouline,  &  D.  L.  Ambroson  (Eds.),  Talent  development:  Proceedings  from  the  1991  Henry  B.  and  Jocelyn  Wallace  national  research  symposium  on  talent  development  (pp.  298-­‐318).  Unionville,  NY:  Trillium.  Hieronymous,  A.  N.,  &  Hoover,  H.  D.  (1986).  Iowa  test  of  basic  skills.  Chicago:  Riverside.  Herrenkohl,  E.  C.  (1994).  Resilient  early  schoolage  children  from  maltreating  homes:  Outcomes  in  late  adolescence.  American  Journal  of  Orthopsychiatry,  64,  301-­‐309.  Higgins,  G.  O.  (1994).  Resilient  adults.  San  Francisco:  Jossey-­‐Bass.  Kirschenbaum,  R.  J.  (1993,Fall).  Dynamic  assessment  and  its  use  with  high  ability  students.  In  The  National  Research  Center  on  the  Gifted  and  Talented  Newsletter  (pp.  12-­‐13).  Storrs,  CT:  The  National  Research  Center  on  the  Gifted  and  Talented.  Kramer,  L.  R.  (1990,April).  A  comparison  of  at-­‐risk  and  successful  students  school  experiences  in  a  multicultural  junior  high.  Paper  presented  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  American  Educational  Research  Association,  Boston,  MA.  (ERIC  Document  Reproduction  Service  No.  ED  318  828)  Maker,  C.  J.  (1996).  Identification  of  gifted  minority  students:  A  national  problem,  needed  changes  and  a  promising  solution.  Gifted  Child  Quarterly,  40(1),  41-­‐50.  Marcus,  A.M.  (1986).  Academic  achievement  in  elementary  school  children  of  alcoholic  mothers.  Journal  of  Clinical  Psychology,  42,  372-­‐376.  Marland,  S.  J.  (1972).  Education  of  the  gifted  and  talented.  (Report  to  the  Congress  of  the  United  States  by  the  U.S.  Commissioner  of  Education).  Washington,  DC:  U.S.  Government  Printing  Office.  (ERIC  Document  Reproduction  Service  No.  ED  056  243)  Meyer,  D.C.,  &  Phillips,  W.  M.  (1990).  No  safe  place:  Parental  alcoholism  and  adolescent  suicide.  American  Journal  of  Psychotherapy,  44,  552-­‐562.  
  • 19. Moss,  H.  B.,  Vanyukov,  M.,  &  Majumder,  P.  P.  (1995).  Prepubertal  sons  of  substance  abusers:  Influences  of  parental  and  familial  substance  abuse  on  behavioral  disposition,  IQ,  and  school  achievement.  Addictive  Behaviors,  20,  345-­‐358.  Office  of  Educational  Research  &  Improvement.  (1993).  National  excellence:  A  case  for  developing  America}  talent.  Washington,  DC:  Government  Printing  Office.  Olszewski-­‐Kubilius,  P.,  &  Yasumoto,  J.  (1994).  Factors  affecting  the  academic  choices  of  academically  talented  adolescents.  In  N.  Colangelo,  S.  G.  Assouline,  &  D.  L.  Ambroson  (Eds.),  Talent  development:  Proceedings  from  the  1993  Henry  B.  and  Jocelyn  Wallace  national  research  symposium  on  talent  development  (pp.  393-­‐397).  Dayton,  OH:  Ohio  Psychology  Press.  Peterson,  J.  S.  (1990).  Noon-­‐hour  discussion  groups:  Dealing  with  the  burdens  of  capability.  Gifted  Child  Today,  13(4),  17-­‐22.  Peterson,  J.  S.  (1995).  Talk  with  teens  about  feelings,  family,  relationships  and  the  future.  Minneapolis,  MN:  Free  Spirit.  Peterson,  J.  S.,  &  Colangelo,  N.  (1996).  Gifted  achievers  and  underachievers:  A  comparison  of  patterns  found  in  school  files.  Journal  of  Counseling  and  Development,  74(4),  309-­‐407.  Peterson,  J.  S.,  &  Margolin,  L.  (in  press).  Naming  gifted  children:  An  example  of  unintended  "reproduction."  Journal  for  the  Education  of  the  Gifted.  Pollock,  V.  E.,  Briere,  J.,  Schneider,  L.,  Knop,  J.,  Mednick,  S.  A.,  &  Goodwin,  D.  W.  (1990).  Childhood  antecedents  of  antisocial  behavior:  Parental  alcoholism  and  physical  abusiveness.  American  Journal  of  Psychiatry,  147(10),  1290-­‐1293.  Rak,  C.,  &  Patterson,  L.  E.  (1996).  Promoting  resilience  in  at-­‐risk  children.  Journal  of  Counseling  &Development,  74(4),  368-­‐373.  Richert,  E.  S.  (1991).  Rampant  problems  and  promising  practices  in  identification.  In  N.  Colangelo  &  G.  A.  Davis  (Eds.),  The  handbook  of  gifted  education  (pp.  81-­‐98).  Needham  Heights:  Allyn  &  Bacon.  Robertson,  E.  (1991).  Neglected  dropouts:  The  gifted  and  talented.  Equity  and  Excellence,  25,  62-­‐74.  Sattler,  J.  M.  (1992).  Assessment  of  Children  (3rd  ed.).  San  Diego:  Sattler.  Scott,  M.  S.,  Perou,  R.,  Urbano,  R.,  Hogan,  A.,  &  Gold,  S.  (1992).  The  identification  of  giftedness:  A  comparison  of  White,  Hispanic,  and  Black  families.  Gifted  Child  Quarterly,  36(3),  131-­‐139.  Sisk,  D.  A.  (1988).  Children  at  risk:  The  identification  of  the  gifted  among  the  minority.  Gifted  Education  International  5(3),  138-­‐141.  Smith,  J.  (1995).  Temperament  and  stress  resilience  in  school-­‐age  children:  A  within-­‐families  study.  Journal  of  the  American  Academy  of  Child  and  Adolescent  Psychiatry,  34,  168-­‐179.  Spindler,  G.,  &  Spindler,  L.  (1990).  The  American  cultural  dialogue  and  its  transmission.  London:  Falmer  Press.  Streissguth,  A.  P.  (1994).  A  long-­‐term  perspective  of  FAS.  Alcohol  Health  &  Research  World,  18(1),  67-­‐72.  Swiatek,  M.  A.  (1995).  An  empirical  investigation  of  the  social  coping  strategies  used  by  gifted  adolescents.  Gifted  Child  Quarterly,  39(3),  154-­‐161.  Tomori,  M.  (1994).  Personality  characteristics  of  adolescents  with  alcoholic  parents.  Adolescence,  29,  949-­‐959.  
  • 20. VanTassel-­‐Baska,  J.  (1989).  Disadvantaged  gifted  learners  at-­‐risk  for  educational  attention.  Focus  on  Exceptional  Children,  22(3),  1-­‐15.  VanTassel-­‐Baska,  J.  (1991  ).  Gifted  youth  at  risk:  A  report  of  a  national  study.  Reston,  VA:  Council  for  Exceptional  Children.  (ERIC  Document  Reproduction  Service  No.  ED  334  807)  Wang,  M.  C.  (1995).  Serving  students  at  the  margins.  Educational  Leadership,  52(4),  12-­‐17.  Ward,  T.  J.,  Jr.  (1992).  Examination  of  a  new  protocol  for  the  identification  of  at-­‐risk  gifted  learners.  Paper  presented  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  American  Educational  Research  Association,  San  Francisco.  (ERIC  Document  Reproduction  Service  No.  ED  387  979)  Werner,  E.  E.  (1984).  Resilient  offspring  of  alcoholics:  A  longitudinal  study  from  birth  to  age  18.  Journal  of  Studies  on  Alcohol  47,  34-­‐40.  Werner,  E.  E.  (1986).  Resilient  children.  Young  Children,  40,  68-­‐72.  Werner,  E.  E.,  &  Smith,  R.  S.  (1982).  Vulnerable  but  not  invincible:  A  longitudinal  study  of  resilient  children  and  youth.  New  York:  McGraw  Hill.  Appendix  A  What  experiences  or  events  in  your  life  have  taught  you  the  most  about  life?  What  are  the  most  important  things  you  have  learned  from  these  experiences?  What  do  you  wish  others  understood  about  you  (peers,  parents,  teachers,  siblings)?  What  do  you  understand  now  that  you  wish  you  had  understood  when  you  were  younger?  What  are  some  things  that  seem  to  be  quite  predictable/unpredictable  in  your  life?  What  are  some  things  that  probably  will/wont  change  in  your  life?  Which  of  (several  listed)  feelings  do  you  feel  most  intensely  at  this  point  in  your  life?  When  are  some  times  when  you  feel  these  strong  feelings?  What  would  you  like  to  do  with  your  life?  Where  would  you  like  to  be  living  15  years  from  now?  What  would  you  like  to  be  doing  then?  What  would  you  like  your  life  to  be  like?  What  is  the  most  difficult  aspect  of  your  life  at  this  point?  How  long  has  it  been  difficult?  What  has  been  the  most  difficult  part  of  life  so  far?  What  are  some  of  the  most  uncomfortable  times  youve  had  at  school?  What  do  you  most  appreciate  about  yourself?.  What  are  you  most  proud  of?.  What  personal  qualities  have  helped  you  through  difficult  times?  What  are  some  of  the  nicest  things  that  have  happened  to  you  at  school?  Who  are  some  of  the  nicest  people  you  have  met  in  your  life?  How  could  adults  assist  you  in  your  growing  up  these  days?  
  • 21. What  do  you  expect  will  change  in  your  life  over  the  next  year?  ~~~~~~~~  By  Jean  Sunde  Peterson    Jean  Sunde  Peterson  is  an  assistant  professor  in  Counselor  Preparation  at  Truman  State  University,  MO.  A  former  state  teacher  of  the  year,  she  is  the  author  of  two  Talk  with  Teens  books  (Free  Spirit  Publishing)  and  regularly  presents  at  national  conferences  on  schoolrelated  topics,  including  underachievement  and  at-­‐risk  populations.  She  has  worked  with  high-­‐ability  children  and  their  families  in  private  practice  and  in  treatment  centers.    Copyright  of  Journal  of  Secondary  Gifted  Education  is  the  property  of  Prufrock  Press  and  its  content  may  not  be  copied  or  emailed  to  multiple  sites  or  posted  to  a  listserv  without  the  copyright  holders  express  written  permission.  However,  users  may  print,  download,  or  email  articles  for  individual  use.