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Pulse webinar, 5 HVAC Energy Wasters

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James Smith, Pulse Energy’s Building Automation System (BAS) expert, presented this informative webinar on how you can identify and fix five common sources of energy waste in Heating, Ventilating, and …

James Smith, Pulse Energy’s Building Automation System (BAS) expert, presented this informative webinar on how you can identify and fix five common sources of energy waste in Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems.

James is a factory trained controls technician with over 18 years of hands-on experience installing and servicing HVAC automation systems for Siemens Building Technologies and Johnson Controls in office towers, universities and hospitals. During the webinar he:

- presented five common sources of energy waste in these important building systems
- shared ways to address them to lower energy costs, improve building performance and occupant comfort

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • 1. Pulse Energy Webinar:5 Common EnergyWasters in HVAC Systems 1
  • 2. 3 Things You Want to Know About This Presentation• The presentation will be 45-60 minutes, including Q&A• You can sand your questions to us via the GoToWebinar control panel at any time• We are recording the webinar 2
  • 3. Agenda• Intro• 5 Common Energy Wasters • Bad marriage of pneumatic and electronic control • Inappropriate temperatures in HW loops • Duct leakage • Simultaneous heating & cooling • Forgotten overrides• Quick overview of Pulse• Q&A 3
  • 4. Intro: James Smith• 18 years experience as a factory trained controls technician• Installed and serviced HVAC automation systems for Siemens Building Technologies and Johnson Controls in office towers, universities and hospitals• Presenting 5 common issues which lead to energy waste 4
  • 5. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect the device position in the field 5
  • 6. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 6
  • 7. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 100% Open 7
  • 8. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 100% Open • Reliable • Repeatable 8
  • 9. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 100% Open 9
  • 10. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Large stock of pneumatic devices 0 – 100% Open 10
  • 11. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 20 PSI 0 – 100% Open 3 – 8 PSI 11
  • 12. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 4 – 9 PSI 0 – 100% Open 3 – 8 PSI 12
  • 13. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 4 – 9 PSI 0 – 100% Open 3 – 8 PSI 13
  • 14. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 20 PSI 0 – 100% Open 3 – 8 PSI 14
  • 15. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Problem: DDC computer may not accurately reflect device position in the field 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 20 PSI 0 – 100% Open 4 – 9 PSI 3 – 8 PSI 20 PSI 15
  • 16. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• One way to identify this problem: look for unbelievable temperatures 0 – 5 VDC 0 – 20 PSI 0 – 100% Open 4 – 9 PSI 3 – 8 PSI 20 PSI 16
  • 17. #1: Pairing Pneumatic & Electronic Control• Possible solutions: • schedule both trades to work together • cross train 17
  • 18. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature• Problem: inappropriate water temperatures for terminal units 18
  • 19. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature • Most Boilers • Consider manufacturers limits • Consider terminal units 19
  • 20. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature • Local set point 20
  • 21. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature • Reset based on external variable 21
  • 22. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature • Reset based on external variable • Possible to use Valve positions 22
  • 23. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature • Within the mfg limits for the boiler 23
  • 24. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature Primary Loop Secondary Loop• Radiant Panels 24
  • 25. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature Primary Loop Secondary Loop• Secondary Loop control• Reduces losses on low demand• Allows for set points that reflect the end devices 25
  • 26. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature Primary Loop Secondary Loop• Radiant Panels typically require 175 to 185 deg F water (79 - 85 deg C) 26
  • 27. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature 27
  • 28. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature 28
  • 29. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature 29
  • 30. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature 30
  • 31. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature• Loop is reset based on outdoor temperature• Loop is running at 60 deg C (20 less than typical)• Even primary water is too cool for radiant panels 31
  • 32. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature• Loop is reset based on outdoor temperature• Loop is running at 60 deg C (20 less than typical)• Even primary water is too cool for radiant panels 32
  • 33. #2: Heating Water Loop Temperature• Possible solutions: • Read manufacturers literature on acceptable operating temperatures for your terminal units • Set up reset schedules based on these limits • If you have radiant panels – run them hot 33
  • 34. #3: Duct leakage• Problem: conditioned air leaking out of ducts 34
  • 35. #3: Duct leakage• Indicator is ceiling space or return air path cooler than the spaces served• Seals fail over time• Tenant retrofits do not always complete this detail 35
  • 36. #3: Duct leakage• Seems harder to justify• Definitely harder to quantify• Absolutely wasted energy• Protect your energy source• Think of your conditioned air as energy• Night job resealing ductwork 36
  • 37. #4: Simultaneous Heating & Cooling• Problem: poor sequencing• Correct sequencing of heating & cooling is critical• For high humidity control, enthalpy must be a factor in your free cooling calculation • Delays in switching off consume excess mechanical cooling • Delays in switching on fail to take advantage of available free cooling 37
  • 38. #4: Simultaneous Heating & Cooling• Mixed Air Temp set points • Difficult to set correctly • Invite operator intervention • Require tuning • Add a layer of complication • Get rid of them. Sequence your mixing dampers directly with your heating and cooling 38
  • 39. #4: Simultaneous Heating & Cooling• Hot and Cold Deck setpoints • Use zone demand to calculate • Create “just enough” heating or cooling to satisfy your highest demand zone• This applies to resetting your static pressure 39
  • 40. #5: Forgotten overrides• For all sorts of good reasons operators override devices temporarily.• Too often, when the need has passed, the override is long forgotten.• When it is an entire system left running the cost can add up quickly. 40
  • 41. #5: Forgotten overrides 41
  • 42. #5: Forgotten overrides 42
  • 43. #5: Forgotten overrides 43
  • 44. #5: Forgotten overrides 44
  • 45. #5: Forgotten overrides• When you have an energy monitoring system you can see the results of what you do.• Alerts can notify you when demand exceeds predictions by a defined threshold. 45
  • 46. Pulse EMS: Occupant Engagement 46
  • 47. Measuring and Reporting Energy Savings
  • 48. Pulse EMS: Understanding Your Building 48
  • 49. Pulse EMS: Understanding Your Building 49
  • 50. Questions? 50
  • 51. Thank you!•Additional questions? Contact Pulse Energy •1-877-331-0530 •info@pulseenergy.com •http://www.pulseenergy.com/company/contact•More energy management best practices •On-demand webinars: http://www.pulseenergy.com/resources/energy- management-webinars/ •Pulse blog: http://blog.pulseenergy.com/ 51