Pulse Energy Webinar: Sustainability in Cities

1,413 views
1,298 views

Published on

City governments are committed to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions to lead by example in their communities. Creating and following a practical sustainability plan that has significant impact is key to successfully reducing energy use.

This webinar featured Sadhu Johnston, Vancouver's Deputy City Manager, as learn about the initiatives that Vancouver is taking to become the world's greenest city by 2020. Sadhu will share with you:

* How the City reduced municipal operations' energy use by 24%
* The City's strategy for improving the energy performance of over 1,000,000 square feet of its buildings
* Specific tips on how you can implement building energy management for sustainability

Sadhu is the former Chief Environmental Officer of the City of Chicago, where he helped the City identify key sustainability issues and implemented programs that put the Chicago on the road to being one of the greenest cities in North America. As Deputy City Manager, Sadhu is leading Vancouver towards its goal of becoming the world's greenest city by 2020. Register now to reserve your spot and the opportunity to ask questions about municipal sustainability to a recognized leader in the field.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,413
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pulse Energy Webinar: Sustainability in Cities

  1. 1. Sustainability in CitiesSadhu Johnston, Deputy City Manager, City of Vancouver David Helliwell, Co-founder and CEO, Pulse Energy
  2. 2. 3 Things You Want to Know AboutThis Presentation1. The presentation will be 60minutes including Q&A2. You can send your questions tous via the GoToWebinar controlpanel at any time3. We will send out a link to therecording after the presentation
  3. 3. Pulse Energy Management Software
  4. 4. Pulse Energy Management Software• Manage Your Energy Data
  5. 5. Pulse Energy Management Software• Engage Your Building Occupants in Energy Reduction
  6. 6. Pulse Energy Management Software• See How Your Buildings Measure Up
  7. 7. Occupant / Public Engagement
  8. 8. Reducing Energy Use Through Contests
  9. 9. Data Management
  10. 10. 1
  11. 11. Vancouver’s Greenest City Goals 1. Green Economy 2. Climate Leadership 3. Green Buildings 4. Green Transportation 5. Zero Waste 6. Access to Nature 7. Lighter Footprint 8. Clean Water 9. Clean Air 10. Local Food 2
  12. 12. Visions and Plans
  13. 13. 4
  14. 14. 5
  15. 15. Change in Emissions from 1990-2008 Per Total CapitaAll Emissions 0% 21%Buildings 0% 21%Light Duty Vehicles 15% 9%Heavy Duty Vehicles 45% 15%Solid Waste 43% 55% 6
  16. 16. Source of Vancouver’s2008 Community GHG Emissions Waste HeavyVehicles 5% 8% Buildings 32% 55% Light Duty Vehicles 7
  17. 17. Community GHG Emissions and Targets • Since 1990, Vancouver population +27%, jobs +18% • 2008 community GHG emissions = 1990 levels • On track to meet Kyoto 6% below 1990 levels by 2012Annual GHG Tonnes (000,000) 3.0 Vancouver Council GHG Targets 2.5 6% below 1990 by 2012 2.0 1.5 33% below 2007 by 2020 1.0 80% below 1990 by 2050 0.5 0.0 Carbon neutral new 8 buildings by 2030 1990 2006 2008 2012 2020 2050
  18. 18. TransportationShare of All Total Change Per Capita ChangeEmissions Since 1990 since 1990 37% + 18% - 7% 9
  19. 19. Green Transportation Compact mixed-use communities with Easy access to work, shopping & recreation 10
  20. 20. Land Use and TransportationClean Vehicles• Requiring electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure for 20% of parking stalls in multi-family homes• Launching public parking charging program to support EV owners• Forming agreements with leading automakers to deploy their EVs sooner in this region• Working closely with BC Hydro and BC Gov’t to accelerate actions 11
  21. 21. BuildingsShare of All Total Change Per Capita ChangeEmissions Since 1990 since 1990 55% 0% - 21% 12
  22. 22. Green Building- Push & PullEcoDensity and Green Rezoning• LEEDTM gold for all rezonings• Green roofs for rezonings• For rezonings on sites greater than 2 acres: – District Energy Feasibility Study – Stormwater Management Plan – Low-carbon TDM Strategy• Priority permitting for ultra-green developments• New housing types including laneway 13 houses and suites within apartments
  23. 23. 14
  24. 24. 15
  25. 25. Green BuildingsRetrofitting Existing Buildings• Moving toward requiring energy performance for retrofit permits• Work with utilities to develop new financing tools for energy retrofits and renewable energy technologies (e.g. on-bill financing)• With financing tools, City can regulate improvements more aggressively 16
  26. 26. Green BuildingsGreen Homes Program (for one and two family dwellings)“The best code on the continent”• R-20 Insulation in walls• In-suite energy use displays• Energy Star Windows• Insulated hot water tanks and pipes• 40% non-incandescent light fixtures• Direct vent gas fireplaces• Heat Recovery Ventilation• Mandatory Energuide audit• Pre-piping for renewable energy• Dual flush toilets• Electric vehicle Charging 17
  27. 27. 18
  28. 28. 19
  29. 29. Energy Management• Use only the energy that you need• Using the same principles as financial management to track energy use• Once energy use audited, recommend upgrades – Major Equipment Upgrade – Minor Equipment Upgrade – Automation System changes 20 – Behaviour changes
  30. 30. Spending to Save• Paying for investments with Energy Savings• Payback (PB) is• GHG impact less relevant when speaking in $• City of Vancouver’s long-term vision allows for deeper investments: – Private Sector – 3-5 year payback – Public sector ~ 10 year payback – City of Vancouver is 20 years 21
  31. 31. How did we do it?• Set the target: 20% GHG reduction from 1990 levels by 2010• Provided staff• Created financing tool• Three contracts with Ameresco Canada• Over $15 Million invested• Saving $941,000 annually• Reducing 3,290 tonnes of GHG emissions annually• Projects run from mundane to the leading edge 22
  32. 32. ESCo Phase 1 – City Hall Campus• Completed 2007• $2 Million• Savings: – $122,000 per year – 361 tonnes GHG reduced• Highlights: – Lighting – New Boilers – Upgraded building automation throughout campus 23
  33. 33. ESCo Phase 2: Park Board• 30 facilities• Complete by end of 2010• $8.6 Million• Savings: – $543,000 per year – 2,240 tonnes GHG reduced• Highlights: – 30 lighting retrofits – 17 new boilers – Building automation – Water conservation upgrades 24
  34. 34. ESCo Phase 3 – Major Facilities• 4 facilities• Completed by end of 2010• Investment: $ 5 Million• Savings: – $276,000 per year – 688 tonnes GHG reduced• Highlights: – Lighting retrofits throughout Library – Advanced Heat Recovery in Equipment Services – Advanced HVAC Solution for Museum & Archives 25
  35. 35. New BoilersThe museumcomplex’s newboilers anddesiccantdehumidificationsystem will bereducing GHGemissions by 54% 26
  36. 36. Sunset Nursery• Step 1: New high-efficiency boiler• Step 2: Recover heat from Sunset Arena next door• Once complete, save over $40,000 per year• Generating half GHGs previously - over 250 tonnes GHG not being emitted 27
  37. 37. Results• Target to reduce GHG levels 20% below 1990 by 2010• Increased built area 24% in same period• Projections are for phenomenal success:• GHG emissions reduced 22% by end 2010• GHG intensity reduced by 36% – Natural gas consumption down 23% – Electricity consumption up only 8% 28 – Electricity intensity reduction of 13%
  38. 38. Pulse Energy Tracking• PulseTM deployed to manage over a million square feet• City Hall• Administrative buildings & works yards• Enable energy use management 29
  39. 39. Measuring the Impact of the greenest Games• Measurement & Verification• Venue sustainability initiatives• Visitor engagement• ‘Greenest Games’ legacy 30
  40. 40. Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games• Partnership to monitor the Games – VANOC – BC Hydro• VenueEnergyTracker.com – Real-time building energy monitoring at nine Olympic venues 31
  41. 41. Focusing on Eco-DistrictsSoutheast False Creek Neighborhood• LEED Platinum ND• Olympic Village Canada’s first Net Zero Building that generates as much energy as it consumes• LEED Platinum Community Centre• Green roofs (50% coverage)• Solar hot water systems• Rainwater capture and reuse• Low parking and car-sharing• Neighbourhood Energy Utility based on sewer heat recovery, the first of its kind in North 33 America
  42. 42. 34
  43. 43. 35
  44. 44. 36
  45. 45. District Energy in South East False CreekNeighbourhood Energy Utility• Heat distributed via network of hot water pipes to in- building heat exchangers• Sewer Heat Recovery- 70% of Energy from Sewage• Supplementary: Solar Thermal• Peaking & Back-up: Conventional Gas Boilers 37• Over 65% less GHG
  46. 46. Final Thought… “We overestimate what we can achieve in one year and underestimate what can be done in five …”1980s2000s 38
  47. 47. Q&A
  48. 48. Q&A
  49. 49. Q&A
  50. 50. Q&A
  51. 51. Q&A
  52. 52. Q&A
  53. 53. Q&A
  54. 54. Q&A
  55. 55. Thank you! Additional questions?  Contact Pulse Energy at: 1-877-331-0500 or at info@pulseenergy.com Look for future and archived webinars on our website: www.pulseenergy.com/resources/webinars

×