Future of Publishing - a session on innovations in academic journal publishing from the Society for General Microbiology

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With so many changes affecting scholarly publishing, how can new and experienced authors ensure their research is captured by quality journals in a highly discoverable and accessible way? The …

With so many changes affecting scholarly publishing, how can new and experienced authors ensure their research is captured by quality journals in a highly discoverable and accessible way? The publishing team at SGM organised the Future of Publishing session at SGM’s 2014 conference in order to explore these questions.

To share some of the knowledge that was imparted and the debates that arose from the session, we have outlined the structure of the event below and have created a Storify board, including the Twitter activity which can be found here: storify.com/PublishingSGM/future-of-publishing-2014

The current Chair of SGM’s Publishing Committee, Colin Harwood, chaired the session and opened by introducing the panel. Aharon Oheren kicked off the presentations with an introduction to current practices in journal publishing. He described the role of the editor and what happens to your paper after it is submitted, suggested what authors should consider before submitting their paper and discussed different models of peer review, both old and new. He also advised authors on how to handle rejection and the best way to deal with negative reviews.

Paul Hoskisson then explored some of the new methods for communicating research, including social media, as well as new journal models including open access and mega journals. He also considered how altmetrics could be used to measure the impact of science over current methods. He finished by encouraging the audience to take opportunities to influence change in academic publishing.

Leighton Chipperfield then rounded off the presentations by providing a brief summary of innovation in publishing at SGM, including the recent addition of ORCID IDs (have you got yours?). He also explored how semantics are making material more dicoverable and how, as publishers, we’re moving away from traditional publishing models to truly managing knowledge.

The discussion was followed by a Q&A with the whole panel.

Session Co-ordinators: Parita Patel, Product Manager (p.patel@sgm.ac.uk) and Sally Hawkins, Digital Projects Administrator (s.hawkins@sgm.ac.uk)

Session hashtag: #SGMFoP

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  • Source: universetoday.com

Transcript

  • 1. FUTURE OF PUBLISHING ACC Liverpool, Room 12, Tuesday 15 April, 17.35–18.30 Panel: Aharon Oren, Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology Paul Hoskisson, Chair of the SGM Communications Committee Jodi Lindsay, Editor for Microbiology Gavin Thomas, member of SGM Communications Committee and Editor for Microbiology Leighton Chipperfield, Head of Publishing at SGM Event Chair: Colin Harwood, Chair of the SGM Publishing Committee Follow live tweets from the session and join the discussion using the hashtag #SGMFoP
  • 2. THE PEER REVIEW PROCESS Aharon Oren Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology Professor of Microbial Ecology, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, The Institute of Life Sciences, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
  • 3. The two goals of any editor: 1. To help the authors to get their work published 2. To maintain (an if possible, improve) the quality of the journal
  • 4. • Why should you publish? (there can be little doubt here !) • Where should you publish? Not an easy question – some important points for consideration: - Impact factor - Readership - General – specialized journal - Open access
  • 5. Author prepares manuscript (Read the instructions!!) Editorial office – first check; selects editor Editor checks the paper Paper is checked by two or more reviewers Acceptance Revision To production staff
  • 6. • Single-blind : Reviewers’ names are hidden from the authors (the traditional method, by far the most common type). • Double blind : The identities of the authors are concealed from the reviewers and vice versa. • Open : The author and reviewer are made known to each other. This model promotes open, honest reviewing; however, open review may leads to reviewers withholding criticism for fear of damaging their reputation within the community. Peer review models
  • 7. An example of ‘open peer review’:
  • 8. • Post-publication peer review: Papers are reviewed after online publication, reviewers’ comments and decisions and revised manuscripts are published alongside the article. E.g. F1000Research papers are submitted, go through an in- house pre-publication check for ‘suitability, quality, readability, and for any ethical concerns’, then published online within days of being submitted. Papers are then open to being reviewed by anyone - anonymous or not. • Portable peer review: A model allowing the transfer of reviews from one journal to another when a paper is rejected in the first – usually to a related journal or journals within the same publisher. New models of peer review
  • 9. Author prepares manuscript (Read the instructions!!) Editorial office – first check; selects editor Editor checks the paper Paper is checked by two or more reviewers Acceptance Revision To production staff Editor makes decision Rejection
  • 10. Author prepares manuscript (Read the instructions!!) Editorial office – first check; selects editor Editor checks the paper Paper is checked by two or more reviewers Acceptance Revision To production staff Editor makes decision Rejection Revision
  • 11. How NOT to deal with editors From an e-mail exchange with the authors of a rejected paper – March 2013: … …
  • 12. Author prepares manuscript (Read the instructions!!) Editorial office – first check; selects editor Editor checks the paper Paper is checked by two or more reviewers Acceptance Editor makes decision Rejection Revision Acceptance To production staff
  • 13. THE EVOLUTION OF ACADEMIC PUBLISHING http://phylonetworks.blogspot.co.uk Paul A. Hoskisson Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK Email: paul.hoskisson@strath.ac.uk Twitter: @Paulhoskisson
  • 14. Is your finger on the pulse? Traditional ‘hard copy’ journal article
  • 15. Is your finger on the pulse? Traditional ‘hard copy’ journal article
  • 16. The conversation is everywhere… • Traditional journals have been around for a long time – Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. 1664 • Late 1990s – Online availability • Early 2000s – Online submission & Publication – Online only journals, Open Access.. • Subscription & Author pays, Author pays • Late 2000s – Smart phones, Tablets and Apps • Rise of Twitter, Facebook, blogs etc • 2014 and beyond - ??? – Post-REF 2014
  • 17. Multi-platforms – same content • People read papers in different ways
  • 18. Multi-platforms – same content • People read papers in different ways
  • 19. Multi-platforms – same content • People read papers in different ways
  • 20. Mega-Journals
  • 21. Flexible formats… • People no longer only ‘talk’ about science in the coffee room or at conferences…. • Pre-prints – arxiv.org, BioRxiv, Nature Precedings, PeerJ • Post-publication review – Formal – PLoS, PeerJ – Informal – Trial by Twitter - #Arseniclife – Twitter Journal Clubs • Blog about your research, or if you’re lucky somebody else might
  • 22. Measuring research outputs – publication driven! • Citations • What else?
  • 23. Measuring research outputs • Citations • What else?
  • 24. Measuring research outputs • Citations • What else?
  • 25. Where next? • Predicting the future is difficult
  • 26. Where next? • Predicting the future is difficult • Funders need to accept new metrics over IF and traditional citations • A good paper is a good paper… – Article level metrics will become more important – Web 2.0, Semantic Web – Open Access, Open Data – JMM Case Reports, PLoS, PeerJ, Nature Scientific Data, Figshare
  • 27. • We as scientists have the chance to drive the evolution of publishing and make it work for us! • We need to be brave! • Impact can be more than citations – JMM Case Reports
  • 28. Final thought… “I know you have published over 100 articles, but my question was ‘Have you ever made a contribution to the literature?’”
  • 29. A PUBLISHER PERSPECTIVE Leighton Chipperfield Head of Publishing, SGM @leightonc l.chipperfield@sgm.ac.uk
  • 30. Where are we today? • Digital processes • Open Access options • Online and print publication • Impact Factors as key metric • Truly global community of authors & readers Source: http://onebigphoto.com
  • 31. Where are we going? Source: universetoday.com Source: http://www.business2community.com/trend s-news/attend-the-web-3-0-conference- 042658
  • 32. Data • ORCID IDs – have you got yours? • Data repositories • DOIs for data Source: blogs.bmj.com
  • 33. Semantic publishing: what’s in it for me? • Deeper search as a reader • Increased discoverability as an author Source: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pcbi.1000361
  • 34. Access • SGM supports sustainable open access • All papers freely available 12 months after publication (24 months for IJSEM) • – free access for UK taxpayers • – access for developing countries • – Preprint server policy in development
  • 35. Communicating research, measuring impact • Linking with social media tools to promote & share your work • Linking with reference management tools • AltMetrics Source: altmetric.com Source: colwiz.com
  • 36. Impact: a new view? Source: altmetric.com
  • 37. We are moving from publishing to truly managing knowledge.
  • 38. Q & A