December 2013

Educational Publishing Innovation
for a Global Market
Shane Armstrong

Executive Vice President, Scholastic...
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics
• Teaching methods

• Teachers
• Students
• Technology

2
First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of
reading

Students who read widely and
frequently are higher ac...
First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of
reading

Studies have proven that
increased family engagement
...
First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of
reading

Research has found a relation
between the amount of t...
First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of
reading

If an average American reads 20,000
pages a year, the...
First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of
reading

A recent UNESCO study revealed that
Mexicans read on ...
One Nation Reading Together
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics
• Teaching methods

• Teachers
• Students
• Technology

9
• As publishers, we must satisfy the
national obligations to deliver
solutions that foster performance
gains AND provide c...
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics

• Teaching methods
• Teachers
• Students

• Technology

...
The impact of different teaching methods

Reading:
Phonetic awareness, synthetic phonics,
systematic phonics, guided readi...
Example: Phonics

13
Example: Pr1me

14
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics

• Teaching methods
• Teachers
• Students

• Technology

...
Scholastic early English: works for all teachers

16
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics

• Teaching methods
• Teachers
• Students

• Technology

...
Students’ ability to read

18
What else they are accustomed to

19
Our solution: Hi-Lo
• High interest
• Low reading level

• High visual appeal
• Low cost
• High engagement for the student...
Factors that impact educational publishing

• Culture
• Politics

• Teaching methods
• Teachers
• Students

• Technology

...
Blended models
• Assessment and reporting is done online
• Reading can be done online or offline

22
Computer access

24
The impact of teacher training

25
Guess the country!
A major document issued in 2001 calls for the following changes:
•

To move away from pure knowledge tr...
Learning and Reading around the Globe (Shane Armstrong, Scholastic International)
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Learning and Reading around the Globe (Shane Armstrong, Scholastic International)

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The growth of digital devices, digital reading, and online purchasing is opening up new opportunities for publishers around the world, and this is particularly true in the classroom environment. Shane Armstrong, Executive Vice President of Scholastic Corporation and President of International Growth Markets, will present an overview of Scholastic’s big plans for global educational publishing, especially in the core areas of math and reading. He’ll talk about new opportunities with assessment, how ancillary products support Scholastic’s goals, and how trade pubs can take advantage of an increasingly global (and increasingly digital) education market.

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  • Pleasure to be here….I’m here to tell you about what it is to not just a publisher, but an educational publisher. And what it means to innovate in that space.The growth of digital devices, digital reading, and online purchasing is opening up new opportunities for publishers around the world, and this is particularly true in the classroom environment. Shane Armstrong, Executive Vice President of Scholastic Corporation and President of International Growth Markets, will present an overview of Scholastic’s big plans for global educational publishing, especially in the core areas of math and reading. He’ll talk about new opportunities with assessment, how ancillary products support Scholastic’s Common Core goals, and how trade pubs can take advantage of an increasingly global (and increasingly digital) education market.
  • Digital Educational Publishing: It’s not about eBook platforms.It’s about supporting teachers becoming better teachers and students becoming lifelong learners.Each country approaches education slightly differently, with different teaching methods, with teachers at different levels of competency, with students at different levels of ability, with different understanding of how technology can help them. Each of these variables evolve and change often.Let’s look at the first of these six factors: Culture.
  • Specifically look at this in relation to the culture of reading.In Europe and anglo-saxon countries, the importance of reading has been recognized and vetted by research.
  • Cultural differences show that in other parts of the world, reading is seen as a luxury and reading for pleasure as a waste of time. In Many parts of Asia, particularly the more developed countries reading is seen as entertainment and not really ‘education’. Changes here – Taiwan train station libraries.
  • As publishers, part of our role is to help highlight the benefits of reading. Of reading a lot. The just right books. It is a message that Scholastic has spearheaded since 1921 and has made a reality in many homes and school across the US, the UK, Australia and others. Our goal ahead of us is to continue promoting this mission, with updated methods, including leveraging technology.
  • That’s not to say that we haven’t successfully been able to overcome some of these differences with programs such as our One Nation Reading Together.Success in a global world relies on their ability to speak and read fluently in English. In Chennai, India, we had 4,211 kids from 54 different schoolsScholastic’s READ2013 achieved a literacy milestone in Malaysia, getting 2,500 schools to participate in the mass reading sessionRead Everyday Lead a better LifeBooks from a number of publishers are used.
  • International, national and regional politics substantially affect the way we, as publishers, develop our ed tech products.  Common Core has had a huge impact on US product development.  Other national curriculums and international benchmarks such as PISA (PISA is Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), a global test of math, science, and reading skills for high schooler) and TIMMS have also had a similar sea-change effect on the feature sets, content and components of the products we release.  These standards and benchmarks alone do not necessarily prepare students fully for their future academic and professional life.  That's where we (the publisher) come in.   
  • As publishers, we want to close that gap: We want to make sure kids are prepared for their tests AND are prepared for life. With technology we can measure the impact of learning content that may not APPEAR academic to the student, but in fact is.  We can make sure they get the curriculum points covered, while exploring a world that is meaningful to them.  Let's have a look at one of our new programs that does just that.  Literacy Pro. [PLAY THE VIDEO]Speak about where it has been sold – Pakistan, India etc
  • Political shifts and agenda foci have clearly impacted some of the components and features we develop, but nothing more substantially influences our education technology publishing plan than teacher methods. We believe that technology is there to enhance and support the teacher in her way of teaching and her local or national curriculum requirements.
  • The hurdle is that teaching methods vary tremendously around the globe. As a publisher we constantly look at publishing for the BEST global common denominators and allow for appropriate levels of localization.Early instruction in reading may emphasize phonemic awareness, synthetic phonics, systematic phonics. Choosing one method over the other impacts core elements such as the order in which specific letters are introduced to the student, or even, in the case of synthetic phonics, whether letter names are introduced at all.Guided Reading, Extensive Reading, Whole Language further reading and language arts, and, though not mutually exclusive, these methods have distinct impact on how programs are administered and therefore impact technology. Math is also a battleground. Ever since early 2000s when PISA and TIMMS tests highlighted the tremendous gap in performance between the leaders (Finland, Singapore, HK and Korea) and the stragglers (US!), publishers have been busy trying to help schools around the world easily adopt best practices from the leading approaches: TERC, CCSS, Singapore, HK, Korea and Finland. At Scholastic we are no exception.
  • This next example is a new mathematics program. As a publisher, our role is also to look at the different teaching methods and ensure we develop products that cohesively bring an instructional powerhouse in the hands of the teachers. For Pr1me, we didn’t just take Singapore Math, we adapted some elements that we know are done better in the Korean curriculum and in Hong Kong and thoughtfully tested their integration so as to exceed teachers’ expectations and go beyond their teaching method with best practices from around the world.Open source development makes it easier to make adjustments to fit in with requirements of other curriculums,
  • Teachers are our biggest ally and our number one partner is improving students learning. But looking at teachers worldwide, they are VERY different people, with, as we saw, different teaching methods and guided by different political trends, but also at different levels of preparedness.
  • This is a demo of one of our programs in Asia: Scholastic Early English. This program was developed by our Asian operation with an aim at creating a product that could be used by native speaking teachers who didn’t necessarily have a background in teaching English. We believe that we have been able to deliver this through the use of technology.Discuss young backpacker teachers etcetcThe Teacher Pages are front loaded before the lesson are taught so the teacher can prepare using key objectives for the lessons,  video instructions to supplement the print instruction and audio links to practice pronunciations (Click “I can see an apple”). The TV icon models helpful gestures/movements associated with the vocabulary words. (Click the tv icon)The L button is icon for local language.   This  is for teachers’ instruction only and not used with the students directly.We would not want teachers to confuse an alligator with a small lizard,  so the local language pronunciation clarifies themeaning of the English word and illustration immediately.(CLICK FORWARD ONE)Tips are also available throughout the program.Tips are a teaching strategy or game that the teachers can use to reinforce the lesson objectives.Here’s one that shows how actual teachers in our China center practice these lessons.  (Click the tips icon)
  • Students, too, are at very different levels of preparedness. The performance level between countries is only one factor, the performance level between students within a class is another.
  • Their ability to read varies greatly. For example, We sell a similar product in China as we do in Argentina.
  • And their reading level wasn’t enough, we have to also consider what whets their appetite for digital…
  • Our solution…. Hi - LoThe term “high-Low” is usually used to refer to “High Interest – Low Readibility”This means that the content of the book is interesting to a 10 year old, say, but the ready needs to only have the reading ability of a 8 year old to read and understand the book.At Scholastic, we also use it for a number of other, seemingly contradictory, attributes that define our product development constraints.High visual appealLow costHigh engagement for the studentLow implementation for the teacherHigh technology usabilityLow bandwidth
  • My final point today which is an issue for all: the ubiquity of technology, yes, but also, the difference in the format and quality of technology as well as the preparedness of teachers and students to adopt technology.
  • As a result, most of our core products are blended: they support a wide array of student to computer ratios and allow teachers to implement the program in different ways, depending on the number of computers/tablets they have in class and the student’s access to computers at home.Though we obviously offer a fantastic eBook platform, we also support these blended models by promoting at least assessment and reporting digitally, while reading and practice can be done offline if needed.
  • Using the OECD benchmarks, we see that there are 4 different standards to measure teacher ability. Within each of these standards, there is a very wide spread of competency. Yes, our programs need to support each and everyone of them.
  • In 2001, this country called for the following changes at the national level [GIVE THEM TIME TO READ}In 2009, they came in #1 at PISA.  Amazing!  Based on that, you'd assumed the country had nailed their national educational policy.  But let's read what findings have been: "the changes in student learning were brought about chiefly by organised and structured top-down reforms, implemented either through examinations or policy shifts. Such measures may be well designed, but students are still not given much autonomy in their study […] and are not fully prepared for their lives and work in the future. This is seen as a deep crisis, exacerbated by the reality of single-child families.”OK... The last sentence gave it away... we're talking about China. China is not alone.  The tension between performance against local, national and international benchmarks does not necessarily mean that the student is preparing "for their lives and work in the future".  What does this mean for us as publishers…
  • Transcript of "Learning and Reading around the Globe (Shane Armstrong, Scholastic International)"

    1. 1. December 2013 Educational Publishing Innovation for a Global Market Shane Armstrong Executive Vice President, Scholastic President, Scholastic International
    2. 2. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 2
    3. 3. First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of reading Students who read widely and frequently are higher achievers than students who read rarely and narrowly. 3
    4. 4. First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of reading Studies have proven that increased family engagement in educational programs is linked with increases in child reading achievement and other academic successes 4
    5. 5. First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of reading Research has found a relation between the amount of time that children read for fun on their own and reading achievement. 5
    6. 6. First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of reading If an average American reads 20,000 pages a year, the corresponding number for an average Indian is 320. 6
    7. 7. First hurdle: the differences in the cultural perception of reading A recent UNESCO study revealed that Mexicans read on average just over two books per year, while Swedes finish that many every month. 7
    8. 8. One Nation Reading Together
    9. 9. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 9
    10. 10. • As publishers, we must satisfy the national obligations to deliver solutions that foster performance gains AND provide content that helps students want to become a life-long learners. • With technology we can measure the impact of learning content that may not APPEAR academic to the student, but in fact is. 10
    11. 11. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 11
    12. 12. The impact of different teaching methods Reading: Phonetic awareness, synthetic phonics, systematic phonics, guided reading, extensive reading, whole language Math: TERC, CCSS, Singapore, HK, Korea, Finland 12
    13. 13. Example: Phonics 13
    14. 14. Example: Pr1me 14
    15. 15. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 15
    16. 16. Scholastic early English: works for all teachers 16
    17. 17. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 17
    18. 18. Students’ ability to read 18
    19. 19. What else they are accustomed to 19
    20. 20. Our solution: Hi-Lo • High interest • Low reading level • High visual appeal • Low cost • High engagement for the student • Low implementation for the teacher • High technology usability • Low bandwidth 20
    21. 21. Factors that impact educational publishing • Culture • Politics • Teaching methods • Teachers • Students • Technology 21
    22. 22. Blended models • Assessment and reporting is done online • Reading can be done online or offline 22
    23. 23. Computer access 24
    24. 24. The impact of teacher training 25
    25. 25. Guess the country! A major document issued in 2001 calls for the following changes: • To move away from pure knowledge transmission towards fostering learning attitudes and values. • To move away from discipline-based knowledge, towards more comprehensive and balanced learning experiences. • To move away from pure “bookish” knowledge and to improve relevance and interest in the content of a curriculum. • To move away from repetitive and mechanistic rote-learning towards increased student participation, real-life experience, capacity in communications and teamwork, and ability to acquire new knowledge and to analyse and solve problems. • To de-emphasise the screening and selective functions of assessments and instead to emphasise their formative and constructive functions. • To move away from centralisation, so as to leave room for adaptation to local relevance and local needs. #1 in the 2009 OECD PISA Post assessment survey results: “As one experienced educator insightfully expressed it, the changes in student learning were brought about chiefly by organised and structured top-down reforms, implemented either through examinations or policy shifts. Such measures may be well designed, but students are still not given much autonomy in their study […] and are not fully prepared for their lives and work in the future. This is seen as a deep crisis, exacerbated by the reality of single-child families.” 26

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