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March 21st Meeting for PEPS
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March 21st Meeting for PEPS

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  • Luis, Diane, Marian
  • Dawn
  • Transcript

    • 1. For a graphic recording of the meeting conversation, refer to Kathy Evans’ Panels 1-3 at engagementforschools.orgInterview Report-Back March 21, 2012
    • 2. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 3. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 4. Agenda An overview of PEPS is available atWelcome engagementforschools.orgWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 5. The Interview Questions PEPS interviewed over 90 stakeholders, with the same set of• Why do you do this work? questions.• What is the value/benefit of a civic dialogue?• What are the risks/dangers of a civic dialogue?• How do you envision this dialogue happening? • Where do you see it being held? • Who should be there? • Do you know of any models?• Who else should we talk to?
    • 6. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 7. Key Themes In the 90+ interviews, we heard common themes.• SF is a world-class city, it should have world-class public schools.• We need greater collaboration/alignment across education stakeholders.• We need a neutral facilitator that everyone trusts to engage us.• We risk building false hope for change and support (e.g., report on a shelf).• We still have hope. We are committed to public schools. We are willing to try.
    • 8. Why do you do this work? A representation ofinterview responses to the first question.
    • 9. What We Heard
    • 10. Benefits Summary of common responses to “What is the value/benefit of a civic dialogue?”• Raise awareness about public education• Improve public perception of our public schools• Increase funding and support for our public schools• Improve collaboration, role clarification and alignment across education stakeholders• Increase civic engagement in our public schools• Build consensus and unity of purpose around a common vision• Attract/Retain families for our public schools• Increase support for families and children in SF
    • 11. Risks Summary of common responses to “What is the risk/danger of a civic dialogue?”• Building false hopes for change and support• Another report on the shelf• No risk• The blame game• More polarization• Grandstanding• More conflicts among existing organizations• More negative feelings about SFUSD• No action/no impact• Uneven, limited participation
    • 12. Barriers Although not specifically asked, many interviewees called out barriers to effective dialogue.• Ego/Conflicting political interests• Turf issues• Race and social class• Dialogue is complicated, emotional• Participation is not inclusive, too narrow• Some populations have time constraints• Lack of translation to reach non-English-speaking groups• Lack of confidence in process• Lack of interest• Lack of knowledge/Misinformation about public schools• Mistrust of the school system
    • 13. Who should be included? • Teachers • Business community • Principals • CBO‟s • Parents • City government • Students • Neighborhood groups • Not the usual suspects/The „real deal‟ • The usual suspects • Traditionally under-represented populations • Adults without children It is clear a dialogue • School-based organizations must include a diverse • Faith-based communityset of stakeholders from • Independent school community across San Francisco. • Foundations
    • 14. Where should it take place? Meet people where they are (in communities/neutral spaces) • Libraries • Churches • Schools • Neighborhoods • Workplaces • House parties “creative in both location and timing” Dialogue must meetpeople in their comfortzones, where they can have authentic conversation.
    • 15. Envisioning the Process While many formats were suggested, small groups were by far theFormats: most recommended.Small groups leading up to a large conversationSmall conversations onlyBig conversation onlyBig conversation that branches into small groupsTechnology-enabledOngoing dialogue groups; institutionalized
    • 16. Envisioning the ProcessCharacteristics: Many formats were suggested; small groupsSet clear goals were by far the mostBased on building relationships recommended format.Focus on the positiveProvide strong, neutral facilitationInform with good data
    • 17. Reflection Participants reflected on and shared their response to the interview findings.What did you hear that surprised you?What did you hear that confirms or matches your own assessment?What did you hear that was encouraging?Would you like to consider the findings in more depth?
    • 18. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 19. Draft Timeline Develop Plan Plan & Engage 3-5 StatementsApril - June August – October November - PEPS proposes to spend the next 3 months planning and piloting: • the format of small group dialogues, which will each generate 3-5 statements that capture the imagination and vision of the city. • the composition of small groups representing diverse stakeholders The small group statements will inform a larger stakeholder group that will define statements to frame a city-wide public engagement campaign.
    • 20. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 21. Moving to public engagementWhat has been your experience of why conversations lead to inaction? Participants shared their responses in pairs.
    • 22. Moving to public engagementHow can we together ensure this process leads to action? Participants shared their responses as a group.
    • 23. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A
    • 24. Next Steps PEPS invited attendees to join the process through participation inCommit to: planning, pilot groups or small groups• Participate in planning (April – June)• Sponsor/host pilot group• Participate in small dialogue groups www.engagementforschools.org
    • 25. AgendaWelcomeWho is in the Room?Public Engagement for Public Schools (PEPS) – What, Why, HowInterview FindingsTimelineDiscussionNext StepsQ&A

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