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Following the lecture on quality models and the importance of taking into account good practices, we focus on patterns by providing examples of well-known idioms, design patterns, and architectural ...

Following the lecture on quality models and the importance of taking into account good practices, we focus on patterns by providing examples of well-known idioms, design patterns, and architectural patterns. We then go on presenting their history, forms, as well as concrete examples of their uses. We also discuss approaches to identify their occurrences in the source code of OO systems under maintenance.

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    Software Design Patterns in Practice Software Design Patterns in Practice Presentation Transcript

    • Some Theory and Practice on Patterns – In Practice Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc NII, Tokyo, Japan 12/02/14 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercialShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    • Patterns  Patterns document reusable solutions to recurring problems – Architecture • Architectural styles – Design • Design patterns • Design anti-patterns – Implementation • Idioms 2/213
    • Examples  Do you know – C++? – Java? – Lisp? – Prolog? – Smalltalk? 3/213
    • C++ class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 4/213
    • C++ class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; ? Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 5/213
    • C++ class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Overriding of operator = ? Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 6/213
    • Java final Object oldListOfEntities = this.listOfEntities(); this.fireVetoableChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); this.removeEntity(anEntity); this.firePropertyChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); 7/213
    • Java final Object oldListOfEntities = this.listOfEntities(); this.fireVetoableChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); this.removeEntity(anEntity); this.firePropertyChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); ? 8/213
    • Java final Object oldListOfEntities = this.listOfEntities(); this.fireVetoableChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); this.removeEntity(anEntity); this.firePropertyChange( "RemoveEntity", oldListOfEntities, anEntity); Veto protocol of JavaBeans ? 9/213
    • Lisp (define (square ls) (if (null? ls) '() (cons ((lambda(x) (* x x)) (car ls)) (square (cdr ls))))) 10/213
    • Lisp (define (square ls) (if (null? ls) '() (cons ((lambda(x) (* x x)) (car ls)) (square (cdr ls))))) ? 11/213
    • Lisp (define (square ls) (if (null? ls) '() (cons ((lambda(x) (* x x)) (car ls)) (square (cdr ls))))) ? Map 12/213
    • Prolog checkLt0(LA, LT, LD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) :nextEvent( [], E), interpretEvent(E, IE), checkLt1(IE, LA, LT, LD, NLA, NLT, NLD), !, ( (IE = programEnd, NNLA = NLA, NNLT = NLT, NNLD = NLD) ; checkLt0(NLA, NLT, NLD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) ). 13/213
    • Prolog checkLt0(LA, LT, LD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) :nextEvent( [], E), interpretEvent(E, IE), checkLt1(IE, LA, LT, LD, NLA, NLT, NLD), !, ( (IE = programEnd, NNLA = NLA, NNLT = NLT, NNLD = NLD) ; checkLt0(NLA, NLT, NLD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) ). ? 14/213
    • Prolog checkLt0(LA, LT, LD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) :nextEvent( [], E), interpretEvent(E, IE), checkLt1(IE, LA, LT, LD, NLA, NLT, NLD), !, ( (IE = programEnd, NNLA = NLA, NNLT = NLT, NNLD = NLD) ; checkLt0(NLA, NLT, NLD, NNLA, NNLT, NNLD) ). ? Conditional 15/213
    • Smalltalk Integer>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addInteger: self Float>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addFloat: self Integer>>addInteger: anInteger <primitive: 1> Float>>addFloat: aFloat <primitive: 2> Integer>>addFloat: aFloat ^self asFloat addFloat: aFloat Float>>addInteger: anInteger ^self addFloat: anInteger asFloat Kent Beck ; Smalltalk – Best practice patterns ; Pages 55–57, Prentice Hall, 1997, ISBN 0-13-476904-X. 16/213
    • Smalltalk Integer>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addInteger: self Float>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addFloat: self Integer>>addInteger: anInteger <primitive: 1> Float>>addFloat: aFloat <primitive: 2> Integer>>addFloat: aFloat ^self asFloat addFloat: aFloat Float>>addInteger: anInteger ^self addFloat: anInteger asFloat ? Kent Beck ; Smalltalk – Best practice patterns ; Pages 55–57, Prentice Hall, 1997, ISBN 0-13-476904-X. 17/213
    • Smalltalk Integer>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addInteger: self Float>>+ aNumber ^aNumber addFloat: self Integer>>addInteger: anInteger <primitive: 1> Float>>addFloat: aFloat <primitive: 2> Integer>>addFloat: aFloat ^self asFloat addFloat: aFloat Float>>addInteger: anInteger ^self addFloat: anInteger asFloat Double dispatch ? Kent Beck ; Smalltalk – Best practice patterns ; Pages 55–57, Prentice Hall, 1997, ISBN 0-13-476904-X. 18/213
    • Conclusion on the Examples  The examples showed idioms in the given pieces of source code – These idioms are recurring motifs in a program source code – These motifs connote a recognized, acknowledge style of programming 19/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 20/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 21/213
    • Definition  Context – 1977 et 1979: architecture • Christopher Alexander • A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction and the idea of generative patterns • The Timeless Way of Building and the idea of perfection in architecture – 1990: object-oriented design • Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, and John Vlissides† • Design Patterns drawn from experience 22/213
    • Definition A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction – 253 patterns – Generative grammar – “At the core... is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets and communities. This idea... comes simply from the observation that most of the wonderful places of the world were not made by architects but by the people.” 23/213
    • Definition “Each pattern describes a problem which occurs over and over again in our environment, and then describes the core of the solution to that problem, in such way that you can use this solution a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice.” —Christopher Alexander, 1977 “Each pattern is a three part rule, which express a relation between a context, a problem, and a solution.” —Christopher Alexander, 1977 24/213
    • 盈進学園 東野高等学校 http://eishin.ac/ 25/213
    • Definition  Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable OO Software – 23 patterns – Not a language? – “Dynamic, highly parameterized software is harder to understand and build than more static software.” 26/213
    • Definition “The strict modeling of the real world leads to reflect today’s realities but not necessarily tomorrow’s. The abstractions that emerge during design are key to making a design flexible.” —Erich Gamma, 1994 27/213
    • JHotDraw http://www.jhotdraw.org/ http://www.javaworld.com/article/2074997/swing-gui-programming/ become-a-programming-picasso-with-jhotdraw.html 28/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance 29/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance – Patterns have been identified for • • • • Different phases of software development Different levels of abstraction Different technologies … 30/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance 31/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance – Problem faced by three people at three different times in a similar context – Particular problems are not included, except if they occur more than three times… 32/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance 33/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance – Essentially, a solution must describe steps to solve the problem • Architecture • Design • Implementation 34/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance 35/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance – The solution must not be particular – The solution can be adapted – The solution must be adapted 36/213
    • Definition A pattern is a general reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software development, operation, and maintenance – The solution must not be particular – The solution can be adapted – The solution must be adapted • Forces • Variants 37/213
    • Recall the C++ Example class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 38/213
    • Recall the C++ Example class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 39/213
    • Recall the C++ Example class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Development, operation, and maintenance Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 40/213
    • Recall the C++ Example class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Development, operation, and maintenance Commonly occurring problem within a given context Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 41/213
    • Recall the C++ Example class Dog { string name; Dog(const Dog* dog) : name(dogname) {}} class Kennel { Dog* dog; string name; } if (&kennel != this) { thisdog = new Dog(kennel.dog); thisname = kennel.name; } return *this; Development, operation, and maintenance Commonly occurring problem within a given context General reusable solution Bruce Eckel ; Thinking in C++ ; Volume 2, pages 551–553, Planet PDF, 2nd Edition, 2000. 42/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 43/213
    • Quality A means to enhance the reusability – Of the code written using the pattern + Its flexibility – Of the problem and its solution     44/213
    • Quality A means to enhance the reusability – Of the code written using the pattern + Its flexibility – Of the problem and its solution A means to encapsulate design experience    45/213
    • Quality A means to enhance the reusability – Of the code written using the pattern + Its flexibility – Of the problem and its solution A means to encapsulate design experience  A common vocabulary among designers   46/213
    • Quality A means to enhance the reusability – Of the code written using the pattern + Its flexibility – Of the problem and its solution A means to encapsulate design experience  A common vocabulary among designers A means to have that “quality without a name” 47/213
    • Quality Without a Name     48/213
    • Quality Without a Name “There is a point you reach in tightening a nut, where you know that to tighten just a little more might strip the thread, but to leave it slightly looser would risk having the hut coming off from vibration. If you've worked with your hands a lot, you know what this means, but the advice itself is meaningless.” —Robert Pirsig, circa. 1972   49/213
    • Quality Without a Name “There is a point you reach in tightening a nut, where you know that to tighten just a little more might strip the thread, but to leave it slightly looser would risk having the hut coming off from vibration. If you've worked with your hands a lot, you know what this means, but the advice itself is meaningless.” —Robert Pirsig, circa. 1972 “[T]oo often software developers spend their days grinding away for pay at programs they neither need nor love. But not in the Linux world - which may explain why the average quality of software originated in the Linux community is so high.” —Eric Raymond, 1998 50/213
    • Quality Without a Name 51/213
    • Quality Without a Name ニワトリのヒナの雌雄鑑別 (chick sexing)   http://discovermagazine.com/2011/sep/18-your-brain-knows-lot-more-than-you-realize 52/213
    • Quality Without a Name ニワトリのヒナの雌雄鑑別 (chick sexing) “The master would stand over the apprentice and watch. The student would pick up a chick, examine its rear, and toss it into one bin or the other. The master would give feedback: yes or no.” —Eagleman, 2011 http://discovermagazine.com/2011/sep/18-your-brain-knows-lot-more-than-you-realize 53/213
    • 54/213
    • Practice, practice and practice more 55/213
    • 56/213
    • Quality  Rationale – “Software design is widely recognised as being a “wicked” or “ill-structured” problem, characterised by ambiguous specifications, no true/false solutions (only ones that are “better” or “worse” from a particular perspective), the lack of any “stopping rule” to determine when a solution has been reached, and no ultimate test of whether a solution meets the requirements.” —Zhang and Budgen, 2012 57/213
    • Quality “Important assumptions – That patterns can be codified in such a way that they can be shared between different designers – That reuse will lead to “better” designs. There is an obvious question here of what constitutes “better”, but a key measure is maintainability” —Zhang and Budgen, 2012 (With minor adaptations) 58/213
    • Quality “Advantages: – Using patterns improves programmer productivity and program quality – Novices can increase their design skills significantly by studying and applying patterns – Patterns encourage best practices, even for experiences designers – Design patterns improve communication, both among developers and from developers to maintainers” —Zhang and Budgen, 2012 (With minor adaptations) 59/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 60/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 61/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 62/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 63/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 64/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 65/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – “Theoretical” – With examples – Among others… 66/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – Amazon.com • Books › Computers & Technology › Programming › Software Design, Testing & Engineering › ObjectOriented Design › "patterns" • 224 results on May 31, 2013 67/213
    • Form  Several books, articles – Amazon.com • Exclusion – Unreleased books – Specific to a technology or frameworks » e.g., MVVM Unleashed by Michael Brown – Process oriented, user-interface, programming languages » e.g., Process Patterns: Building Large-Scale Systems Using Object Technology by Scott W. Ambler and Barbara Hanscome – Proceedings of conferences – Unrelated to software engineering 68/213
    • Form 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Patterns for Concurrent and Networked Objects: Volume 2 (Wiley Software... by Douglas C. Schmidt, Michael Stal, Hans Rohnert and Frank Buschmann Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Patterns for Resource Management: Volume 3 (Wiley Software Patterns Series... by Michael Kircher and Prashant Jain Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, A System of Patterns: Volume 1 (Wiley Software Patterns Series) by Frank Buschmann, Regine Meunier, Hans Rohnert and Peter Sommerlad Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture For Dummies (For Dummies (Computers)) by Robert Hanmer Web Security Patterns by Ramesh Nagappan and Christopher Steel Safe C++ by Vladimir Kushnir Programming in the Large with Design Patterns by Eddie Burris Elemental Design Patterns by Jason McC. Smith Java Application Architecture: Modularity Patterns with Examples Using OSGi (Robert C. Martin Series) by Kirk Knoernschild Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions (Addison-Wesley Signature... by Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Fowler)) by Martin Fowler Cognitive Patterns: Problem-Solving Frameworks for Object Technology by Robert K Konitzer, Bobbin Teegarden, Alexander Rush and Karen M Gardner Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services by Robert Daigneau The ACE Programmer's Guide: Practical Design Patterns for Network and Systems Programming by Stephen D. Huston, James CE Johnson and Umar Syyid Patterns for Parallel Software Design (Wiley Software Patterns Series) by Jorge Luis Ortega-Arjona Design Patterns in Object-oriented ABAP by Igor Barbaric Object-Oriented Reengineering Patterns by Oscar Nierstrasz, Stéphane Ducasse and Serge Demeyer Dependency Injection by Dhanji R. Prasanna Object-Oriented Software Engineering Using UML, Patterns, and Java (3rd Edition) by Bernd Bruegge and Allen H. Dutoit J2EE Design Patterns by William Crawford and Jonathan Kaplan Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development by Craig Larman Object-oriented Analysis and Design Using Umlan Introduction to Unified Process and Design Patterns by Mahesh P. Matha C++ Design Patterns and Derivatives Pricing (Mathematics, Finance and Risk) by M. S. Joshi Effective Java (2nd Edition) by Joshua Bloch Patterns for Fault Tolerant Software (Wiley Software Patterns Series) by Robert Hanmer Implementation Patterns by Kent Beck Patterns for Computer-Mediated Interaction (Wiley Software Patterns Series) by Till Schummer and Stephan Lukosch Pattern Oriented Software Architecture Volume 5: On Patterns and Pattern Languages by Frank Buschmann, Kevlin Henney and Douglas C. Schmidt Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications (3rd Edition) by Grady Booch, Robert A. Maksimchuk, Michael W. Engle and Bobbi J. Young Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design by Brett D. McLaughlin, Gary Pollice and Dave West Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C# by Robert C. Martin and Micah Martin Design Patterns For Dummies by Steve Holzner Pattern Languages of Program Design 5 by Dragos Manolescu, Markus Voelter and James Noble Design Patterns in Java(TM) (Software Patterns Series) by Steven John Metsker and William C. Wake Object-Oriented Design and Patterns by Cay S. Horstmann 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. Object-Oriented Modeling and Design with UML (2nd Edition) by Michael R. Blaha and James R Rumbaugh Remoting Patterns: Foundations of Enterprise, Internet and Realtime Distributed Object Middleware (Wiley Software... by Markus Völter, Michael Kircher and Uwe Zdun Software Factories: Assembling Applications with Patterns, Models, Frameworks, and Tools (Wiley Application Development... by Jack Greenfield, Keith Short, Steve Cook and Stuart Kent Refactoring to Patterns by Joshua Kerievsky Architecting Enterprise Solutions: Patterns for High-Capability Internet-based Systems (Wiley Software Patterns... by Paul Dyson and Andrew Longshaw Enterprise Patterns and MDA: Building Better Software with Archetype Patterns and UML by Jim Arlow and Ila Neustadt Data Access Patterns: Database Interactions in Object-Oriented Applications by Clifton Nock Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software by Eric Evans Pattern-Oriented Analysis and Design: Composing Patterns to Design Software Systems by Sherif M. Yacoub, Hany H. Ammar, Sherif Yacoub and Hany Ammar Java Extreme Programming Cookbook by Eric M. Burke and Brian M. Coyner J2EE Best Practices: Java Design Patterns, Automation, and Performance (Wiley Application Development Series) by Darren Broemmer Real-Time Design Patterns: Robust Scalable Architecture for Real-Time Systems by Bruce Powel Douglass Design Patterns Java¿ Workbook by Steven John Metsker EJB Design Patterns: Advanced Patterns, Processes, and Idioms by Floyd Marinescu Streamlined Object Modeling: Patterns, Rules, and Implementation by Jill Nicola, Mark Mayfield and Mike Abney Design Patterns Explained: A New Perspective on Object-Oriented Design by Alan Shalloway and James Trott Small Memory Software: Patterns for systems with limited memory (Software Patterns Series) by James Noble and Charles Weir AntiPatterns in Project Management by William J. Brown, Hays W. "Skip" McCormick III and Scott W. Thomas Pattern Languages of Program Design 4 (Software Patterns Series) by Brian Foote, Neil Harrison and Hans Rohnert Testing Object-Oriented Systems: Models, Patterns, and Tools by Robert V. Binder Design Patterns and Contracts by Jean-Marc Jezequel, Michel Train and Christine Mingins Object-Oriented Software Development Using Java: Principles, Patterns, and Frameworks (1/e) by Xiaoping Jia Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code by Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, John Brant and William Opdyke More Process Patterns: Delivering Large-Scale Systems Using Object Technology (SIGS: Managing Object Technology... by Scott W. Ambler Pattern Hatching: Design Patterns Applied by John Vlissides AntiPatterns: Refactoring Software, Architectures, and Projects in Crisis by William J. Brown, Raphael C. Malveau, Hays W. "Skip" McCormick and Thomas J. Mowbray A Little Java, A Few Patterns (Language, Speech, & Communication) by Matthias Felleisen, Daniel P. Friedman and Ralph E. Johnson Pattern Languages of Program Design 3 (v. 3) by Robert C. Martin, Dirk Riehle and Frank Buschmann Object Models: Strategies, Patterns, and Applications (2nd Edition) by Peter Coad, David North and Mark Mayfield Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models by Martin Fowler Patterns of Software: Tales from the Software Community by Richard P. Gabriel Pattern Languages of Program Design 2 (v. 2) by John Vlissides, James O. Coplien and Norman L. Kerth Software Patterns by James Coplien Software Architecture: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline by Mary Shaw and David Garlan Adaptive Object-Oriented Software: The Demeter Method with Propagation Patterns: The Demeter Method with Propagation... by Karl Lieberherr Pattern Languages of Program Design by James O. Coplien and Douglas C. Schmidt 69/213
    • Form “Each pattern is a three part rule, which express a relation between a context, a problem, and a solution.” —Christopher Alexander, 1977 70/213
    • Form  General form as for the GoF also inspired by Coplien’s form – Name – Problem(s) – Solution – Consequences 71/213
    • Form (Extended)  General form as for the GoF also inspired by Coplien’s form – Name – Problem(s) – Example(s) – Solution – Example(s) – Consequences – (Follow-up) 72/213
    • Form  General form as for the GoF also inspired by Coplien’s form – Not formal – Room for interpretation – But… • UML-like class diagrams • UML-like sequence diagrams • Smalltalk / C++ example code 73/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 74/213
    • Example  Simplified (1/5) compiler – Parse files to build an AST – Iterate over the AST • Build DefaultMutableTreeNodes javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode for a graphical representation of the AST • Bind types • Generate code • … 75/213
    • Example  Simplified (1/5) compiler – Parse files to build an AST – Iterate over the AST • Build DefaultMutableTreeNodes javax.swing.tree.DefaultMutableTreeNode for a graphical representation of the AST • Bind types • Generate code • … 76/213
    • Example  (2/5) AST CompilationUnit Main generateCode() Class generateCode() Field Method generateCode() generateCode() Statement generateCode() 77/213
    • Example (3/5) package compiler; import java.util.Set; public class Method { private Set statements; public void addStatement(final Statement aStatement) { this.statements.add(aStatement); } public void removeStatement(final Statement aStatement) { this.statements.remove(aStatement); } } package compiler; package compiler; public class Field { /* To be implemented. */ } public class Statement { /* To be implemented. */ } 78/213
    • Example (4/5) package compiler; import java.util.Set; public class Class { private String name; private Set methods; private Set fields; public String getName() { return this.name; } public void addMethod(final Method aMethod) { this.methods.add(aMethod); } public void removeMethod(final Method aMethod) { this.methods.remove(aMethod); } public void addField(final Method aField) { this.fields.add(aField); } public void removeField(final Field aField) { this.fields.remove(aField); } } 79/213
    • Example (5/5) package compiler; import java.util.Iterator; import java.util.Set; public class CompilationUnit { private Set classes; public void addClass(final Class aClass) { this.classes.add(aClass); } public void removeClass(final Class aClass) { this.classes.remove(aClass); } public Class getClass(final String aName) { final Iterator iterator = this.classes.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) { final Class aClass = (Class) iterator.next(); if (aClass.getName().equals(aName)) { return aClass; } } return null; } } 80/213
    • Naïve Implementation  How (1/7) to generate microcode for – Microsoft Windows operating system – Intel Pentium processor 81/213
    • Naïve Implementation  How (1/7) to generate microcode for – Microsoft Windows operating system – Intel Pentium processor Add a generateCode() method in each class 82/213
    • Naïve Implementation (2/7) public class Method { … public String generateCode() { String generatedCode = ""; /* Do something at the beginning. */ final Iterator iterator = this.statements.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) { final Statement aStatement = (Statement) iterator.next(); generatedCode += aStatement.generateCode(); } /* Do something at the end. */ return generatedCode; } } public class Field { … public String generateCode() { String generatedCode = ""; /* Do something. */ return generatedCode; } } public class Statement { … public String generateCode() { String generatedCode = ""; /* Do something. */ return generatedCode; } } 83/213
    • Naïve Implementation (3/7) public class Class { … public String generateCode() { String generatedCode = ""; /* Do something at the beginning. */ final Iterator iteratorOnFields = this.fields.iterator(); while (iteratorOnFields.hasNext()) { final Field aField = (Field) iteratorOnFields.next(); generatedCode += aField.generateCode(); } final Iterator iteratorOnMethods = this.methods.iterator(); while (iteratorOnMethods.hasNext()) { final Method aMethod = (Method) iteratorOnMethods.next(); generatedCode += aMethod.generateCode(); } /* Do something at the end. */ return generatedCode; } } 84/213
    • Naïve Implementation (4/7) public class CompilationUnit { … public String generateCode() { String generatedCode = ""; /* Do something at the beginning. */ final Iterator iterator = this.classes.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) { final Class aClass = (Class) iterator.next(); generatedCode += aClass.generateCode(); } /* Do something at the end. */ return generatedCode; } } 85/213
    • Naïve Implementation m : Main cu : CompilationUnit c : Class (5/7) m : Method s : Statement generateCode( ) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) 86/213
    • Naïve Implementation  Limitations (6/7) of the naïve implementation – What about generating code for • Linux on PowerPC? • Linux on Motorola 68060? • OS/400 on AS/400? 87/213
    • Naïve Implementation  Limitations (6/7) of the naïve implementation – What about generating code for • Linux on PowerPC? • Linux on Motorola 68060? • OS/400 on AS/400? Combinatorial explosion of generateCodeForXXX() methods in each class 88/213
    • Naïve Implementation (7/7)  Requirements – Decouple the data structure • The AST – From algorithms on the data structure • The generateCodeForXXX() method • And others, including type binding! 89/213
    • Naïve Implementation (7/7)  Requirements – Decouple the data structure • The AST – From algorithms on the data structure • The generateCodeForXXX() method • And others, including type binding! The Visitor design pattern guides you to do that! 90/213
    • Visitor  Name: (2/13) Visitor  Intent: “Represent an operation to be performed on the elements of an object structure. Visitor lets you define a new operation without changing the classes of the elements on which it operates.” 91/213
    • Visitor (3/13)  Motivation: “Consider a compiler that represents programs as abstract syntax trees. It will need to perform operations on abstract syntax trees for "static semantic" analyses like checking that all variables are defined. It will also need to generate code.” 92/213
    • Visitor (4/13)  Motivation (cont’d): “[…] It will be confusing to have type-checking code mixed with pretty-printing code or flow analysis code. […] It would be better if each new operation could be added separately, and the node classes were independent of the operations that apply to them.” 93/213
    • Visitor (5/13)  Motivation (cont’d): “We can have both by packaging related operations from each class in a separate object, called a visitor, and passing it to elements of the abstract syntax tree as it's traversed.” 94/213
    • Visitor (6/13)  Motivation (cont’d): “When an element accepts the visitor, it sends a request to the visitor that encodes the element's class. It also includes the element as an argument. The visitor will then execute the operation for that element—the operation that used to be in the class of the element.” 95/213
    • Visitor (8/13)  Applicability – An object structure contains many classes of objects with differing interfaces… – Many distinct and unrelated operations need to be performed on objects in an object structure… – The classes defining the object structure rarely change, but you often want to define new operations over the structure… 96/213
    • Visitor (9/13)  Structure 97/213
    • Visitor  (10/13) Participants – Visitor (NodeVisitor) • Declares a Visit operation for each class… – ConcreteVisitor (TypeCheckingVisitor) • Implements each Visit… – Element (Node) • Defines an Accept operation… – ConcreteElement (AssignmentNode) • Implements Accept … – ObjectStructure (Program) • Can enumerate its elements • May provide a high-level interface to allow the visitor to visit its elements • May either be a composite (see Composite) or a collection 98/213
    • Visitor (11/13)  Collaborations 99/213
    • Visitor (13/13)  Consequences: …  Implementation: …  Sample code: …  Known uses – ASTs – Meta-models –…  Related patterns: Composite 100/213
    • Better Implementation (1/6) package compiler.visitor; import import import import import compiler.Class; compiler.CompilationUnit; compiler.Field; compiler.Method; compiler.Statement; public interface Visitor { void open(final Class aClass); void open(final CompilationUnit aCompilationUnit); void open(final Method aMethod); void close(final Class aClass); void close(final CompilationUnit aCompilationUnit); void close(final Method aMethod); void visit(final Field aField); void visit(final Statement aStatement); } 101/213
    • Better Implementation (2/6) public class Method { … public void accept(final Visitor aVisitor) { aVisitor.open(this); final Iterator iterator = this.statements.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) { final Statement aStatement = (Statement) iterator.next(); aStatement.accept(aVisitor); } aVisitor.close(this); } } public class Field { … public void accept(final Visitor aVisitor) { aVisitor.visit(this); } } public class Statement { … public void accept(final Visitor aVisitor) { aVisitor.visit(this); } } 102/213
    • Better Implementation (3/6) public class Class { … public void accept(final Visitor aVisitor) { aVisitor.open(this); final Iterator iteratorOnFields = this.fields.iterator(); while (iteratorOnFields.hasNext()) { final Field aField = (Field) iteratorOnFields.next(); aField.accept(aVisitor); } final Iterator iteratorOnMethods = this.methods.iterator(); while (iteratorOnMethods.hasNext()) { final Method aMethod = (Method) iteratorOnMethods.next(); aMethod.accept(aVisitor); } aVisitor.close(this); } } 103/213
    • Better Implementation (4/6) public class CompilationUnit { … public void accept(final Visitor aVisitor) { aVisitor.open(this); final Iterator iterator = this.classes.iterator(); while (iterator.hasNext()) { final Class aClass = (Class) iterator.next(); aClass.accept(aVisitor); } aVisitor.close(this); } } 104/213
    • 105/213 Better implementation (5/6)
    • (5/6) m : Main cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statement Better implementation generateCode( ) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) 106/213
    • (5/6) m : Mai n cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statem ent v : IVisitor accept(IVisitor) open(Com pilationUnit) a ccept(IVisitor) o pen(Cl as s) accept(IVisitor) Better implementation open(Method) a ccept(IVis itor) visit(Statement) clos e(Method) close(C lass) clos e(Compil ationUn it) 107/213
    • m : Mai n cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statem ent v : IVisitor accept(IVisitor) open(Com pilationUnit) a ccept(IVisitor) m : Main cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statement o pen(Cl as s) accept(IVisitor) generateCode( ) open(Method) generateCode( ) a ccept(IVis itor) visit(Statement) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) clos e(Method) close(C lass) clos e(Compil ationUn it) 108/213
    • Better Implementation  By (6/6) using the visitor design pattern – Decouple data structure and algorithms – Put the traversal in only one place, in the AST – Allow the addition of new algorithms without changing the data structure 109/213
    • Better Implementation  By (6/6) using the visitor design pattern – Decouple data structure and algorithms – Put the traversal in only one place, in the AST – Allow the addition of new algorithms without changing the data structure Much better, clearer implementation! 110/213
    • Conclusion on the Example  The Visitor design pattern is useful anywhere you have – A data (stable) structure – Algorithms (infinite) on that data structure  Design patterns provided good solution to recurrent problems! 111/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 112/213
    • Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, and John Vlissides ; Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software ; Addison-Wesley, 1995 113/213
    • Catalogue  Design patterns – Development and maintenance – Design/implementation levels – Examples in C++ and Smalltalk  Divided in three categories – Behavioural – Creational – Structural 114/213
    • Catalogue 115/213
    • Catalogue 116/213
    • Catalogue  Abstract Factory (87) – Provide an interface for creating families of related or dependent objects without specifying their concrete classes  Adapter (139) – Convert the interface of a class into another interface clients expect. Adapter lets classes work together that couldn't otherwise because of incompatible interfaces 117/213
    • Catalogue  Bridge (151) – Decouple an abstraction from its implementation so that the two can vary independently  Builder (97) – Separate the construction of a complex object from its representation so that the same construction process can create different representations 118/213
    • Catalogue  Chain of Responsibility (223) – Avoid coupling the sender of a request to its receiver by giving more than one object a chance to handle the request. Chain the receiving objects and pass the request along the chain until an object handles it 119/213
    • Catalogue  Command (233) – Encapsulate a request as an object, thereby letting you parameterize clients with different requests, queue or log requests, and support undoable operations  Composite (163) – Compose objects into tree structures to represent part-whole hierarchies. Composite lets clients treat individual objects and compositions of objects uniformly 120/213
    • Catalogue  Decorator (175) – Attach additional responsibilities to an object dynamically. Decorators provide a flexible alternative to subclassing for extending functionality  Facade (185) – Provide a unified interface to a set of interfaces in a subsystem. Facade defines a higher-level interface that makes the subsystem easier to use 121/213
    • Catalogue  Factory Method (107) – Define an interface for creating an object, but let subclasses decide which class to instantiate. Factory Method lets a class defer instantiation to subclasses  Flyweight (195) – Use sharing to support large numbers of finegrained objects efficiently 122/213
    • Catalogue  Interpreter (243) – Given a language, define a representation for its grammar along with an interpreter that uses the representation to interpret sentences in the language  Iterator (257) – Provide a way to access the elements of an aggregate object sequentially without exposing its underlying representation 123/213
    • Catalogue  Mediator (273) – Define an object that encapsulates how a set of objects interacts. Mediator promotes loose coupling by keeping objects from referring to each other explicitly, and it lets you vary their interaction independently  Memento (283) – Without violating encapsulation, capture and externalize an object's internal state so that the object can be restored to this state later 124/213
    • Catalogue  Observer (293) – Define a one-to-many dependency between objects so that when one object changes state, all its dependents are notified and updated automatically  Prototype (117) – Specify the kinds of objects to create using a prototypical instance, and create new objects by copying this prototype 125/213
    • Catalogue  Proxy (207) – Provide a surrogate or placeholder for another object to control access to it.  Singleton (127) – Ensure a class only has one instance, and provide a global point of access to it 126/213
    • Catalogue  State (305) – Allow an object to alter its behaviour when its internal state changes. The object will appear to change its class  Strategy (315) – Define a family of algorithms, encapsulate each one, and make them interchangeable. Strategy lets the algorithm vary independently from clients that use it 127/213
    • Catalogue  Template Method (325) – Define the skeleton of an algorithm in an operation, deferring some steps to subclasses. Template Method lets subclasses redefine certain steps of an algorithm without changing the algorithm's structure 128/213
    • Catalogue  Visitor (331) – Represent an operation to be performed on the elements of an object structure. Visitor lets you define a new operation without changing the classes of the elements on which it operates 129/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 130/213
    • Practice “The strict modeling of the real world leads to reflect today’s realities but not necessarily tomorrow’s. The abstractions that emerge during design are key to making a design flexible.” —Erich Gamma, 1994 131/213
    • Practice “The description of communicating objects and classes customized to solve general design problem in a particular context.” —Erich Gamma, 1994 132/213
    • Practice “Each design pattern lets some aspect of system structure vary independently of other aspects, thereby making a system more robust to a particular kind of change.” —Erich Gamma, 1994 133/213
    • The following is only complementary to reading books and practicing 134/213
    • Practice  Scattered information – Informal text A suggested example rather than a general rule Interpreting them all... 135/213
    • Practice  When encountering complex problems? – Numerous design patterns (is there any complete list out there?) – Granularity • • • • Requirements, analysis, architecture Design, implementation (idioms) Refactoring, testing … Knowing them all... 136/213
    • Practice  Iterative induction process – From an example to an abstraction to an application to the abstraction to an application… – Validation process? Applying them all... 137/213
    • Practice  Use known categories – Behavioural – Creational – Structural  Use the Internet  Read and discuss others’ code 138/213
    • Practice  Use known categories – Behavioural – Creational – Structural  Use the Internet  Read and discuss others’ code 139/213
    •    Read and discuss others’ code 140/213
    • Practice  Assess the trade-offs – Flexibility – Complexity 141/213
    • Practice  Assess the trade-offs – Flexibility – Complexity 142/213
    • Practice  Assess the trade-offs – Flexibility – Complexity  Sometimes it is necessary to remove the solution of a DP used in the code 143/213
    • Practice  Sometimes it is necessary to remove the solution of a DP used in the code 144/213
    • Practice “There is a natural relation between patterns and refactorings. “Patterns are where you want to be; refactorings are ways to get there from somewhere else” —Josuha Kerievsky citing Martin Fowler, 2004 145/213
    • 146/213
    • Practice  Refactoring to a Visitor – Previous example of code generation from a common AST  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor, String) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(Class, IVisitor, String, boolean)  Refactoring away from the Visitor – ptidej.statement.creator.classfiles.loc.BCELLOCFinder 147/213
    • Practice  Refactoring to a Visitor – Previous example of code generation from a common AST  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor, String) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(Class, IVisitor, String, boolean)  Refactoring away from the Visitor – ptidej.statement.creator.classfiles.loc.BCELLOCFinder 148/213
    • Practice  Refactoring to a Visitor – Previous example of code generation from a common AST  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor, String) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(Class, IVisitor, String, boolean)  Refactoring away from the Visitor – ptidej.statement.creator.classfiles.loc.BCELLOCFinder 149/213
    • Practice  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – Problem when implementing the solution of the Visitor design pattern • Too many duplicated accept(…) methods • Two cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) 150/213
    • Practice  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – Problem when implementing the solution of the Visitor design pattern • Too many duplicated accept(…) methods • Two cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) • What if the data structure changes? 151/213
    • Practice  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – Problem when implementing the solution of the Visitor design pattern • Too many duplicated accept(…) methods • Two cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) • What if the data structure changes? 152/213
    • Practice  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – Problem when implementing the solution of the Visitor design pattern • Too many duplicated accept(…) methods • Two cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) • What if the data structure changes? – Solution • Use the introspection mechanism of Java 153/213
    • Practice  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – Problem when implementing the solution of the Visitor design pattern • Too many duplicated accept(…) methods • Two cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) • What if the data structure changes? – Solution • Use the introspection mechanism of Java 154/213
    • private boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, final IVisitor visitor, final String methodName, final boolean shouldRecurse) { acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); java.lang.Class argument = null; try { } the introspection mechanism of Java  Use Practice argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); method.invoke(visitor, new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); } else { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } return false; } 155/213
    • private boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, final final MethodIVisitor visitor, visitor.getClass().getMethod( method = final String methodName, final boolean methodName, shouldRecurse) { new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); java.lang.Class argument null; method.invoke(visitor, =new Object[] { this }); try { } the introspection mechanism of Java  Use Practice argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); method.invoke(visitor, new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); } else { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } return false; } 156/213
    • private boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, final IVisitor visitor, final String methodName, final boolean shouldRecurse) { acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); java.lang.Class argument = null; try { } the introspection mechanism of Java  Use Practice argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); method.invoke(visitor, new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); } else { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } return false; } 157/213
    • private boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, final IVisitor visitor, final String methodName, final boolean shouldRecurse) { acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); java.lang.Class argument = null; try { argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); the introspection mechanism of Java } catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); java.lang.Class argumentmethod.invoke(visitor, = null; Practice try { new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { } visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); }  Use catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { else { throw new RuntimeException(e); visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); } } return false; } return false; } 158/213
    • private boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, final IVisitor visitor, final String methodName, final boolean shouldRecurse) { acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); java.lang.Class argument = null; try { } the introspection mechanism of Java  Use Practice argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); method.invoke(visitor, new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); } else { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } return false; } 159/213
    • private e) { catch (final Exception boolean accept( final java.lang.Class currentReceiver, if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { final IVisitor visitor, final String methodName, visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.get...; final boolean shouldRecurse) { } acceptClassName = currentReceiver.getName(); else { java.lang.Class argument = null; try { throw new RuntimeException(e); argument = visitor.getClass().getClassLoader().loadClass(acceptClassName); } the introspection mechanism of Java Practice }  Use } catch (final ClassNotFoundException e) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName, this); return false; } try { final Method method = visitor.getClass().getMethod( methodName, new java.lang.Class[] { argument }); method.invoke(visitor, new Object[] { this }); return true; } catch (final Exception e) { if (e instanceof NoSuchMethodException) { visitor.unknownConstituentHandler(methodName + '(‘ + argument.getName() + ')', this); } else { throw new RuntimeException(e); } } return false; } 160/213
    • Practice  Use the introspection mechanism of Java – No more duplicated accept(…) methods – Handles cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) – Plus, allows extensions to the data structure without changing all existing Visitors 161/213
    • Practice  Use the introspection mechanism of Java – No more duplicated accept(…) methods – Handles cases for visit(…) and open(…)+close(…) – Plus, allows extensions to the data structure without changing all existing Visitors 162/213
    • Practice  Refactoring to a Visitor – Previous example of code generation from a common AST  Implementing a variant of the Visitor – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(IVisitor, String) – padl.kernel.impl.Constituent.accept(Class, IVisitor, String, boolean)  Refactoring away from the Visitor – ptidej.statement.creator.classfiles.loc.BCELLOCFinder 163/213
    • away from the Visitor  Refactoring Practice final FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(path); final ClassParser parser = new ClassParser(fis, path); final JavaClass clazz = parser.parse(); clazz.accept(this.instFinder); fis.close(); public class BCELLOCFinder implements Visitor { private JavaClass currentClass; public void visitCode(final Code aCode) { } public void visitCodeException(final CodeException aCodeException) { } // 18 other empty “visit” methods public void visitJavaClass(final JavaClass aClass) { this.currentClass = aClass; final Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods(); for (int i = 0; i < methods.length; i++) { this.visitMethod(methods[i]); } } // 4 more empty “visit” methods public void visitMethod(final Method aMethod) { Integer count = null; final String ckey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass); final String mkey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass, aMethod); final Map methodMap = this.methodMap(ckey); count = this.getLOC(code); methodMap.put(mkey, count); } // 6 more empty “visit” methods } 164/213
    • away from the Visitor  Refactoring Practice final FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(path); final ClassParser parser = new ClassParser(fis, path); final JavaClass clazz = parser.parse(); clazz.accept(this.instFinder); fis.close(); public class BCELLOCFinder implements Visitor { private JavaClass currentClass; public void visitCode(final Code aCode) { } public void visitCodeException(final CodeException aCodeException) { final FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(path); } // 18 other final ClassParserempty “visit” methods ClassParser(fis, path); parser = new public void visitJavaClass(final JavaClass aClass) { this.currentClass = parser.parse(); final JavaClass clazz = aClass; final Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods(); clazz.accept(this.instFinder); for (int i = 0; i < methods.length; fis.close(); } i++) { this.visitMethod(methods[i]); } // 4 more empty “visit” methods public void visitMethod(final Method aMethod) { Integer count = null; final String ckey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass); final String mkey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass, aMethod); final Map methodMap = this.methodMap(ckey); count = this.getLOC(code); methodMap.put(mkey, count); } // 6 more empty “visit” methods } 165/213
    • away from the Visitor  Refactoring Practice final FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(path); final ClassParser parser = new ClassParser(fis, path); final JavaClass clazz = parser.parse(); clazz.accept(this.instFinder); fis.close(); public class BCELLOCFinder implements Visitor { private JavaClass currentClass; public void visitCode(final Code aCode) { } public void visitCodeException(final CodeException aCodeException) { } // 18 other empty “visit” methods public void visitJavaClass(final JavaClass aClass) { this.currentClass = aClass; final Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods(); for (int i = 0; i < methods.length; i++) { this.visitMethod(methods[i]); } } // 4 more empty “visit” methods public void visitMethod(final Method aMethod) { Integer count = null; final String ckey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass); final String mkey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass, aMethod); final Map methodMap = this.methodMap(ckey); count = this.getLOC(code); methodMap.put(mkey, count); } // 6 more empty “visit” methods } 166/213
    • away from the Visitor  Refactoring Practice public final FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(path); void visitJavaClass(final JavaClass aClass) { final ClassParser parser = new ClassParser(fis, path); this.currentClassparser.parse(); = aClass; final JavaClass clazz = clazz.accept(this.instFinder); final Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods(); fis.close(); for (int i = 0; i < methods.length; i++) { this.visitMethod(methods[i]); public class BCELLOCFinder implements Visitor { private JavaClass currentClass; } public void visitCode(final Code aCode) { } } public void visitCodeException(final CodeException aCodeException) { } // 18 other empty “visit” methods public void visitJavaClass(final JavaClass aClass) { this.currentClass = aClass; final Method[] methods = aClass.getMethods(); for (int i = 0; i < methods.length; i++) { this.visitMethod(methods[i]); } } // 4 more empty “visit” methods public void visitMethod(final Method aMethod) { Integer count = null; final String ckey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass); final String mkey = this.adaptor.adapt(this.currentClass, aMethod); final Map methodMap = this.methodMap(ckey); count = this.getLOC(code); methodMap.put(mkey, count); } // 6 more empty “visit” methods } 167/213
    • Practice  Refactoring away from the Visitor – 28 empty methods – Hard-coded call the visitMethod(…) • See this.visitMethod(methods[i]); – JavaClasses do not contain other similar objects, they are not a Composite object – Unnecessary code, complexity 168/213
    • Practice  Refactoring away from the Visitor – 28 empty methods – Hard-coded call the visitMethod(…) • See this.visitMethod(methods[i]); – JavaClasses do not contain other similar objects, they are not a Composite object – Unnecessary code, complexity 169/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns 170/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns Flexibility 171/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns Flexibility Complexity 172/213
    • Practice  Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns – Flexibility • Favouring composition over inheritance – Complexity • More objects interacting • More messages exchanged 173/213
    • Practice  Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns – Flexibility • Favouring composition over inheritance – Complexity • More objects interacting • More messages exchanged 174/213
    • m : Mai n cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statem ent v : IVisitor accept(IVisitor) open(Com pilationUnit) a ccept(IVisitor) m : Main cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statement o pen(Cl as s) accept(IVisitor) generateCode( ) open(Method) generateCode( ) a ccept(IVis itor) visit(Statement) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) clos e(Method) close(C lass) clos e(Compil ationUn it) 175/213
    • m : Mai n cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statem ent v : IVisitor accept(IVisitor) open(Com pilationUnit) a ccept(IVisitor) m : Main cu : CompilationUnit c : Class m : Method s : Statement o pen(Cl as s) accept(IVisitor) generateCode( ) open(Method) generateCode( ) a ccept(IVis itor) visit(Statement) generateCode( ) generateCode( ) Plus the use of reflection! clos e(Method) close(C lass) clos e(Compil ationUn it) 176/213
    • Practice  Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns – Flexibility • Favouring composition over inheritance – Complexity • More objects interacting • More messages exchanged 177/213
    • Practice  Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns – Flexibility • Favouring composition over inheritance – Complexity • More objects interacting • More messages exchanged 178/213
    • Practice  Flexibility – Favour composition over inheritance • Allow changing implementation • Allow safe inheritance 179/213
    • Practice  Flexibility – Favour composition over inheritance • Allow changing implementation • Allow safe inheritance Add one level of indirection 180/213
    • Practice  Flexibility – Favour composition over inheritance • Allow changing implementation • Allow safe inheritance Add one level of indirection and (possibly) Use double-dispatch 181/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection “Rather than giving you a lengthy explanation, let me just point you to the Strategy pattern. It is my prototypical example for the flexibility of composition over inheritance.” Erich Gamma, 2005 182/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection http://itewbm.tistory.com/29 183/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection http://itewbm.tistory.com/29 184/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection http://itewbm.tistory.com/29 185/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/203210/ is-context-inheritance-as-shown-by-head-first-design-patterns-duck-example-ir 186/213
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    • Practice  Add one level of indirection http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/203210/ is-context-inheritance-as-shown-by-head-first-design-patterns-duck-example-ir 188/213
    • No spe Practice with th cial co eN de ullO for bje “no beh  Add one level of indirection ct d esi avi gn our pat ” tern http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/203210/ is-context-inheritance-as-shown-by-head-first-design-patterns-duck-example-ir 189/213
    • Practice  Add Enc aps u late one level of indirection http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/203210/ is-context-inheritance-as-shown-by-head-first-design-patterns-duck-example-ir wh at v arie s 190/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection “You have a container, and you plug in some smaller objects. These smaller objects configure the container and customize the behaviour of the container. This is possible since the container delegates some behaviour to the smaller thing. In the end you get customization by configuration. ” Erich Gamma, 2005 (With minor adaptations) 191/213
    • Practice  Add one level of indirection “You have a container, and you plug in some smaller objects. These smaller objects configure the container and customize the behaviour of the container. This is possible since the container delegates some behaviour to the smaller thing. In the end you get customization by configuration. ” Erich Gamma, 2005 (With minor adaptations) 192/213
    • Practice  Use double-dispatch – Object receives a message – Object sends a message back with itself as parameter 193/213
    • Practice  Use double-dispatch – Object receives a message – Object sends a message back with itself as parameter 194/213
    • Practice  print(CtxWriter aCTXWriter, Rect aRectangle) { ... } ... print(StringWriter aStringWriter, Triangle aTriangle) { ... } ... PrinterWriter printer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape = new Square(); print(printer, shape); 195/213
    • Practice  print(CtxWriter aCTXWriter, Rect aRectangle) { ... } ... print(StringWriter aStringWriter, Triangle aTriangle) { ... } ... PrinterWriter printer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape = new Square(); print(printer, shape); 196/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 197/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 198/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 199/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 200/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 201/213
    • public class Main { public static void main(final String[] args) { final PrinterWriter writer = new SystemWriter(); IShape shape; shape = new Rect(); shape.printOn(writer); shape = new Square(); shape.printOn(writer); public class SystemWriter implements PrinterWriter { @Override public void print(final Rect rect) { System.out.print("Printed the rectangle: "); System.out.println(this); } @Override public void print(final Square aSquare) { System.out.print("Printed the square: "); System.out.println(this); } } } } public interface PrinterWriter { void print(final Rect aRect); void print(final Square aSquare); ... } public interface IShape { void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter); } http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?DoubleDispatchExample http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/6721807/description.html public class Rect implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } public class Square implements IShape { @Override public void printOn(final PrinterWriter aWriter) { aWriter.print(this); } } 202/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns 203/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns Flexibility 204/213
    • Practice  Unnecessary code, complexity – Trade-offs of (most of) design patterns Flexibility Complexity 205/213
    • Practice  Beware also of “bad” solutions to recurring design problems http://www.jot.fm/issues/issue_2006_07/column4/ 206/213
    • Practice  Anti-patterns (also antipatterns) – A common response to a recurring problem that is usually ineffective and may be counterproductive – Code smells are symptoms of “bad” programming 207/213
    • Practice  Two examples of anti-patterns – Visitor design and JavaClasses ptidej.statement.creator.classfiles.loc.BCELLOCFinder – Blob (aka God Class) 208/213
    • Outline  Definition  Quality  Form  Example  Catalogue  Practice  Conclusion 209/213
    • Conclusion  Patterns ease communication  Patterns improve regularity and quality… even without a name…  Patterns avoid surprises i.e., reinventing the wheel differently each time  Patterns generate architectures 210/213
    • Conclusion  Identify a recurring design problem  Identify a design pattern that potentially solve the problem  Assess the costs and benefits of implementing the proposed solution – Quality and quality without a name 211/213
    • Conclusion  Identify a recurring design problem  Identify that the solution brings – Unneeded flexibility – Unnecessary complexity  Assess the costs and benefits of removing the proposed solution 212/213
    • Conclusion  Tools supporting design patterns – “GoF” book • Lists, classifications, relationships [Gamma et al., 1996] – CASE Tools • Fragments [Florijn et al., 1997] • PatternsBox and Ptidej [Albin et al., 2001] • Refactoring tools… – Navigation • Tutor [Motelet, 2000] 213/213