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Ontario Aerospace Industry Overview

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  • 1. Industry Overview October 2013
  • 2.  Growth  Globalization  Supply Chain Transformation 2
  • 3. Air travel remains a robust growth market Page 3 3
  • 4. Do You Believe In Super Cycles? History And OEM Plans For Large Jet Transport Deliveries By Value (Value in '13 $ Bns) $200 With OEM plans: ‘03-‘14 9.6% CAGR, 175.1% Grow th; ‘11-‘14 16.4% CAGR $150 $100 $50 $0 '59 '63 '67 History '71 '75 '79 OEM Plans '83 '87 '91 '95 '99 '03 Repeat of last ten years '07 '11'13'15'17'19'21 Teal Forecast
  • 5. DRAFT 1 5
  • 6. Airbus sourcing principles: enhanced responsibilities Past Platform Assembly Large-scale Integration Today Airbus (80% of an Airbus (50% of an aircraft cost) The New Airbus Airbus aircraft cost) TIER 1 RSP Value-added Parts and Assemblies Make-to-print Parts and Assemblies Raw Materials Many direct partners No real role for “integrators” Build to print for parts and subassemblies Fewer, but still many direct partners Limited role for “integrators” Fewer large partners sharing the risk, strategy and opportunities Extensive integrators role Global extended enterprise Each tier has more opportunity Page 6 6
  • 7. One to Many One to Few TIER 1 (OEM) TIER 1 (OEM) TIER 2 (Systems Integrator) TIER 3 (Product) TIER 3 (Product) TIER 2 (Systems Integrator) TIER 3 (Product) TIER 2 (Systems Integrator) TIER 3 (Product) TIER 3 (Product) Tier 4 BTP / Services 7
  • 8. An Overview 8
  • 9.  2nd largest in Canada        Aircraft Systems & Equipment Space Systems & Equipment Aerostructures Aircraft Integration Defence MRO 22,000 people  most are technicians, engineers, scientists  $7 billion in revenues  ~ 80% exports  ~ 80% commercial 9
  • 10.  Ontario’s strengths ◦ Integrated Systems and Equipment  Aircraft & Space ◦ Aircraft Structural Assemblies ◦ Aircraft Integration   A wide range of aerospace / aviation design, manufacturing, and product support capabilities In the heart of Canada’s strongest and most diverse technology-based industrial and commercial business community 10
  • 11. • A technology-intensive, diversified cluster • Focused on Systems & Equipment, Aerostructures and Aircraft Integration • Rich and diverse industry / technology capabilities • Strong supporting business / commercial infrastructure • High calibre technical & business people • Superior R&TD support • Globally competitive Ontario is the place to go for aerospace innovation and engineering excellence 11
  • 12.  A Proud History of Innovation & Technology Leadership  Valued Partner in our Communities  Strong Contributor to our Economy 12
  • 13. 13
  • 14.  “Silver Dart” – first powered flight in Canada - piloted by Torontoborn J.A.D. McCurdy. 1909  Curtiss JN-4 Canuck - first airplane manufactured in Canada. Over 1,200 built. Toronto 1917 - 18  World's first variable pitch propeller flight tested. Flight safety and economy greatly improved. 1927  World's first anti-gravity suit tested at Camp Borden. Developed at University of Toronto. 1940  de Havilland Beaver – World’s first successful short takeoff & landing airplane. Toronto 1947  Avro C-102 Jetliner – First commercial jet transport to fly in Western hemisphere. Malton 1949  CF-100 fighter – First front line fighter designed & built in Canada. Toronto 1950 14
  • 15.  Orenda Engine - Canada's first turbojet engine. Most powerful engine of its time. Toronto 1950  de Havilland Otter – Opening Canada’s north to commerce and industry. Toronto 1951  Avro Arrow CF-105, supersonic, all-weather fighter plane, first flight. Considered most advanced jet interceptor in the world. Toronto 1958  World's first emergency locator device built. Required today on all civil aircraft. Ottawa 1959  Canadarm - world's first remote manipulator for space. Ottawa and  Toronto 1972 First elements of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System launched to begin assembly of the International Space Station, with Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield. 1999 15
  • 16. Regional Aircraft (RJ Family, Q Series) Bombardier Business Aircraft (Global Series) Bombardier Commercial Helicopters Bell Helicopter, Eurocopter Light Aircraft (Flight Training) Diamond Special Purpose Aircraft Bombardier, Field, Found Small and Medium Turbine Engines Pratt & Whitney Canada Aerostructures Arnprior Aerospace, Avcorp, Boeing, Magellan, IMP Landing Gear Systems UTAS Landing Gear, MessierBugatti-Dowty, Heroux-Devtek Aircraft Environmental Systems Honeywell Located in Ontario 16
  • 17. Electric Power Systems Honeywell Aircraft Satcom Systems CMC, Honeywell Ottawa Air Traffic Control/Management Systems Raytheon Conversion / Upgrade / Retrofit Field, Cascade, Kelowna Integrated Space Robotics Systems MDA Satellite Multiplexers and Switches ComDev Satellite-aided SAR Systems Honeywell Ottawa Located in Ontario 17
  • 18.  When you fly Porter Airlines, your quiet, comfortable, fast and reliable trip is on a Bombardier Q400 aircraft designed and made in Downsview. 18
  • 19.  Global business jets are the world’s most preferred longrange, luxury business aircraft - made in Downsview. 19
  • 20.  When you are flying on a Boeing jetliner at 35,000 feet, the warm, clean air you breathe is thanks to Honeywell engineers in Mississauga. 20
  • 21.  When you take off and land on a large airliner, 4 times in 10 it’s on landing gear made by Goodrich Landing Gear in Oakville or Messier-Dowty in Ajax. 21
  • 22.  When you see the Canadarm robotic arm enabling astronauts to repair critical equipment on the outside of the Space Station, that’s done with space robotics technology developed by engineers at MDA in Brampton. 22
  • 23. 23
  • 24. Cluster Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 Employees Aerostructures 2 13 42 29 12,400 Landing Gear and Flight Control Actuation 4 13 19 18 9,000 Avionics & Flight Management 2 24 12 3 5,500 Turbine Engines 1 6 17 12 2,900 Environmental Conditioning & Electric Power 2 2 3 2 1,900 MRO 7 10 11 2 7,200 24
  • 25. Companies Companies Employees 550 2 75 1 7,326 12 2,953 44 1,226 31 569 14 12,699 2,250 6 1,249 5 1,053 7 2,584 27 571 18 300 10 8,007 Engines and Engine Components 700 1 1,080 8 72 2 1,287 26 524 12 30 2 3,693 Avionics Systems, Equipment 470 2 3,761 24 175 2 1,286 14 88 3 723 10 6,503 1,152 2 213 3 1,230 2 474 5 30 1 245 2 3,344 5,122 13 41 9,856 25 Ontario Aerospace Key Clusters Aerostructures, Assemblies and Components Landing Gear Systems & Flight Controls Environmental Control Systems & Electric Power Systems Totals % 15.0% 4.4% 6,378 18.6% 13.8% 28.8% 8.4% 8,584 25.1% 116 38.9% 2,439 7.1% 65 21.8% Employees Employees T Companies Enablers Employees Tier 4 Companies Employees Tier 3 Employees Tier 2B Companies Tier 2A Companies Employees Tier 1 1,867 5.5% 38 12.8% 34,246 100.0% 25
  • 26. Employment by Tier Level 5% 15% 7% Tier 1 Tier 2A Tier 2B Tier 3 19% 25% Tier 4 Enablers 29% 26
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  • 33.  Ontario’s strengths ◦ Integrated Systems and Equipment  Aircraft & Space ◦ Aircraft Structural Assemblies ◦ Aircraft Integration   A wide range of aerospace / aviation design, manufacturing, and product support capabilities In the heart of Canada’s strongest and most diverse technology-based industrial and commercial business community 33
  • 34. Market Outreach IRBs Public Procurement IRBs Enhanced Knowledge & Skills Ontario Aerospace R&TD Challenge Fund IRBs ESPRIT Global Supply Clusters Accelerator IRBs Drivers Enablers 34
  • 35.  Market Outreach  Access to current and emerging markets  Priorities  Ontario Aerospace R&TD Challenge Fund  OAC + OCE + NSERC  Funding to support initial projects totalling $2.5M  Enhanced Knowledge and Skills  Transform how we select and develop our people  Transform how we work with our educational partners 35
  • 36.  ESPRIT Ontario Aerospace Global Clusters Accelerator ◦ Key Clusters – Landing Gear, Aerostructures, Avionics, etc.  Suppliers – grow our SMEs, higher value  Systems Integrators and OEMs – more, growing  Supply Network Systems – globally leading performance  OAC Ontario Cluster Leadership  Organizing collaborative Working Groups, Teams, etc.  Delivering agreed programs and projects 36
  • 37. IRBs Technology Development Market Opportunities Supply Cluster Performance Enhanced Knowledge & Skills IRBs Design Engineering Capabilities Advanced Manufacturing Systems SME Supplier Advancement IRBs 37
  • 38.  220 Member Companies  200 Industry Members+ Associate members  20 Affiliate members  Established in 1993  Leadership by Board of Directors  OAC Core Purpose  To be the voice of the Ontario aerospace industry  To increase Ontario’s share of the global aerospace market 38
  • 39. Todd Young V.P. Customer Services & Support Bombardier Commercial Aircraft Brian Teed President Messier-Bugatti-Dowty Inc. Brad Hart Division Manager Metal Improvement Company Inc. Jim Butyniec President & CEO Magellan Aerospace Ltd. Linda Rene President & CEO Safran Electronics Canada Inc. Ted Squires President TFI Aerospace Corporation Dan Breitman V.P., New Product Introduction Pratt & Whitney Canada Tom Melvin Vice President, Operations Arnprior Aerospace Tony Burgess President TDM Technical Services Pierre Delestrade President EADS Canada Inc. Larry Fitzgerald Vice President & General Manager Centra Industries Inc. Joseph Yeremian President Thermodyne Engineering Jean-Michel Comtois V.P. Marketing & Sales Esterline CMC Electronics Eli Brigler President CFN Precision Ltd. Romain Trapp President & CEO Eurocopter Canada Ltd. Andrew Sochaj President Cyclone Manufacturing Ltd. Frank Karakas Vice President, Airbus & Bombardier Goodrich Landing Gear Ernie Lynch President Lynch Dynamics Patrick Drohan Site Leader – Aerospace, Avionics Honeywell Canada Val Wilson Vice President Dishon Limited Brad Bourne President & CEO Firan Technology Group George Koulakian Vice President KK Precision SUSTAINING MEMBER Tony LaMantia Assistant Deputy Minister, Investment & Industry Division, Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Trade & Employment EX OFFICIO MEMBERS André Bernier Senior Director, Aerospace Aerospace, Defence and Marine Branch Industry Canada Rod Jones Executive Director, OAC 39
  • 40. Ontario Aerospace Industry Clear for Take-off October 2013 www.theOAC.ca 40