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Dimensional approach

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This file accompanies a Youtube clip - see ePsychVCE.c

This file accompanies a Youtube clip - see ePsychVCE.c

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  • Ranks on a continuum via data from questionnaires, inventories
  • Ranks on a continuum via data from questionnaires, inventories
  • Ranks on a continuum via data from questionnaires, inventories
  • Ranks on a continuum via data from questionnaires, inventories
  • Ranks on a continuum via data from questionnaires, inventories
  • Transcript

    • 1. Dimensional Approach – to classification of mental disorder• Categorically classifying mental disorders focuses on the KIND of problem a person is experiencing.• A dimensional approach focuses on the EXTENT in which a person has a disorder. Many disorders (especially personality disorders) are simply normal traits gone too far.
    • 2. Dimensional Approach• Doesn’t place people into diagnostic categories.• Places people in dimensions (sometimes seen as dimensions of personality)• Diagnosis, then, becomes not a process of deciding the presence or absence of a symptom or disorder, but rather, the degree to which particular characteristic is present.
    • 3. Dimensional approach• Instead of making judgments of "present or not?", the dimensional approach asks the question "how much?"• Ranks disorder on a continuum based on testing following participants completing inventories (standardised testing)• A dimension viewed as a cluster of related psychological/behavioural characteristics that occur together
    • 4. Dimensional approach• Thus statistics (profiles) can be generated for the population and• values are compared with the statistically ‘normal’ expected values for each characteristic – e.g.• neuroticism, psychoticism, introversion-extroversion• novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence• positive emotionality, negative emotionality, constraint
    • 5. Grading & Transitional• Patient is profiled by grading the severity of symptoms from a number of dimensions in comparison to the population e.g. anxiety, variations in mood, etc.• Symptoms can be monitored over time (Transitional) – to determine the effectiveness of treatment.
    • 6. Strengths• generates richer data i.e. we get more detail of a case by case approach for individual patient’s• A dimensional approach would be better able to capture the complexities of a person’s life that a categorical approach would miss.• Classifies disorder on its severity (not just presence)• Stigma’s from labeling are less likely to occur – i.e. ‘she is highly anxious’ (not she has ‘borderline personality disorder’
    • 7. Weaknesses• Complexity & lack of uniformity in mental health profession.• Particularly given the number of dimensions that need to be rated.

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