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“The New Student Vision for 21st Century Learning: CPS Students “Speak Up” about Emerging Technologies”

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  • 1. The New Student Vision for 21st Century Learning: CPS Students “Speak Up” about Emerging TechnologiesTechTalk 2012: Julie Evans, Project Tomorrow CEO © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 2. The New Student Vision for 21st Century Learning Twitter: #cpstt © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 3. Today’s Discussion: The Big QuestionsWhat are the expectations of K-12 students for 21stcentury learning?How does that student vision compare with theteachers’ & administrators’ reality? What is theunique parent perspective on 21st century learning?How well are today’s K-12 schools meeting theexpectations of students?What are the emerging trends in learning that we allshould be watching? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 4. Discussion Agenda: Speak Up National Research Project Student Vision for 21st Century Education Perspectives of Educators & Parents Key Trends We Are Watching Speak Up 2011 National & CPS Findings Views of K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents and Administrators © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 5. Speak Up National Research ProjectAnnual national research project Online surveys + focus groups Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education Institutions receive free report with their own dataCollect ideas ↔ Stimulate conversations K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators Pre-Service Teachers in Schools of EducationInform policies & programs Analysis and reporting of findings and trends Consulting services to help transform teaching and learning + 2.6 million surveys since 2003 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 6. Speak Up survey question themes Learning & Teaching with Technology 21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship Science and Math Instruction Career Interests in STEM and Teaching Professional Development / Teacher Preparation Internet Safety Administrators’ Challenges Emerging Technologies in the Classroom Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content, E-textbooks Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications Designing the 21st Century School © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 7. What can the Speak Upfindings tell us about the future of learning? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 8. Speak Up National Research ProjectKey Findings: Speak Up 2003 – 2011 Students function as a “Digital Advance Team” Students regularly adopt and adapt emerging technologies for learning Students’ frustrations focus on the unsophisticated use of technologies within education Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults Exacerbation of lack of relevancy in current education © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 9. Emerging from the Speak Up research: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 10. Emerging from the Speak Up research: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity This student vision for “technology enabled learning” mirrors how students want to learn in general © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 11. The Student Vision for Learning Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 12. Speak Up 2010 National Findings Two national releases in Washington DC April 1 and May 11, 2011 The New 3 E’s of Education:Enabled, Engaged, Empowered Report #1: How today’s students are leveraging emerging technologies for learningReport #2: How today’s educators are advancing a new vision for teaching and learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 13. Voices of K-12 Students, Parents & EducatorsSpeak Up 2011 Findings Activities, Attitudes & Aspirations Disconnects & Differences Trends & Leverage Points © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 14. Voices of K-12 Students, Parents & EducatorsSpeak Up 2011 FindingsChicago Public Schools: #10 in participation! Students: K-2 1303 Gr 3-5 2270 Gr 6-8 2264 Gr 9-12 544 Teachers 200 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 15. Voices of K-12 Students, Parents & EducatorsSpeak Up 2011 FindingsChicago Public Schools: Bravo to these schools Clay Elementary Falconer Elementary Gray Elementary Haines Elementary Pasteur Elementary Tarkington Elementary Washington Elementary © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 16. The New 3 E’s of Education:Enabled, Engaged, Empowered Key Trends: Mobile Learning Online Learning E-Textbooks and Digital Content © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 17. The New 3 E’s of Education:Enabled, Engaged, EmpoweredKey Trends: Mobile Learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 18. Besides Internet research, how are students using technology for schoolwork? CPS Students Use of Emerging Technologies for Schoolwork Check grades Collaborate thru Facebook Create media Take tests online Play games Use online textbooks Use Twitter 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Gr 3-5 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 19. Students and mobile learningObstacles to using tech @ school?• 57% of CPS students Gr 6-8 say “not being able to use my mobile device” is a major obstacle © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 20. Students and mobile learningObstacles to using tech @ school?• 57% of CPS students Gr 6-8 say “not being able to use my mobile device” is a major obstacle Solutions? “Let me use my own device” – 52% OR “Provide me with device I can use @school – 38% BTW: Need ways to recharge devices – 29% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 21. Students and their devices CPS Students: Personal Access to Mobile Devices Device K-2 Gr 3-5 Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 Cell phone (without internet 18% 25% 42% 47% access) Smart phone 9% 20% 36% 48% Digital reader 1% 6% 8% 6% MP3 36% 40% 70% 72% Tablet device 16% 17% 21% 17% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 22. Students and mobile learningHow would you use a mobile device to help youwith schoolwork? (CPS Students in grades 6-8) A. Increase effectiveness of school: Check grades 77% Take notes for class 62% Access online textbooks 57% Write papers and do homework 50% Learn about school activities 46% Use the calendar 39% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 23. Students and mobile learningHow would you use a mobile device to help youwith schoolwork? (CPS students in grades 6-8) B. Leverage capabilities to increase personalization of learning process: Anytime, anywhere research 64% Receive reminders & alerts 52% Collaborate with peers & teachers 56% Organize schoolwork assignments 50% Access school network from home 45% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 24. Are parents, teachers & administrators alsomobile-enabled? Personal Access to Mobile Devices District Device Parents Teachers Principals Admin Cell phone (without internet 47% 49% 34% 31% access) Smart phone 67% 54% 64% 70% Digital reader 29% 24% 18% 23% MP3 76% 66% 47% 56% Tablet device 36% 26% 47% 55% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 25. Value proposition for administrators and teachersWhat are the benefits of mobile learning? Teachers Teachers Administrators Administrators 2007 2011 2007 2011 Improves teacher-parent- 35% 55% 31% 36% student communications Increases student 51% 79% 66% 80% engagement in learning Provides way to personalize 30% 61% 30% 58% instruction Develops collaboration and 21% 40% 26% 34% teamwork skills Develops problem solving 26% 50% 34% 41% skills Extends learning beyond 45% 58% 47% 58% school day © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 26. The principals respondHow likely are you this year to allow students to use their own mobile devices for instructional purposes at school? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 27. The principals respondHow likely are you this year to allow students to use their own mobile devices for instructional purposes at school? Will you allow students to use their own mobile devices? 11% 22% 65% Likely Unlikely Unsure © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 28. The principals respond What is holding you back? Top challenges: • Concerns about theft of devices • Concerns about network security • Digital equity issues • Teachers are not trained • Devices could be a distraction © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 29. Mobile learning visionsParents offer a solution to the digital equity challengeIf your child’s school allowed for the use of mobiledevices for educational purposes, how likely is itthat you would purchase one for your child? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 30. Parents offer a solution to the digital equity challengeIf your child’s school allowed for the use of mobile devicesfor educational purposes, how likely is it that you wouldpurchase one for your child? Parents: Willingness to Purchase a Mobile Device for Child 13% 8% Likely Unlikely Unsure 15% School responsibility 62% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 31. CPS teachers’ concerns about mobile learningWhat are your biggest concerns?• Distraction potential 73%• Digital equity 61%• I don’t know how to integrate into 27% instruction• How to teach digital responsibility 24%• Students could cheat with the devices 18% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 32. The New 3 E’s of Education:Enabled, Engaged, EmpoweredKey Trends: Online Learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 33. Who is learning online? Types of online learning CPS CPS experiences Students: Students: Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 100% online school 12% 11% Online self study class 14% 16% Teacher led online class 10% 13% Online class for personal 12% 15% interests © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 34. Both students and parents are interested in online learning If you have not taken an online class, would you like to? Yes! CPS Students in Grades 3-5 33% CPS Students in Grades 6-8 43% CPS Students in Grades 9-12 44% What would you recommend as a good investment to enhance student achievement? 36% of parents say “online classes” Source: Speak Up 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 35. What is the class that CPS students most want to take online?Source: Speak Up 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 36. What is the class that CPS students most want totake online? MATH 55% - Gr 6-8 Students 44% - Gr 9-12 Students © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 37. Why take an online class? For high school students, traditional reasons: scheduling and college credit. For middle school students, it’s about changing the learning paradigm. © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 38. Why take an online class?For high school students, traditional reasons: scheduling andcollege credit.For middle school students, it’s about changing the learningparadigm. Get extra help in a tough subject More comfortable asking questions In control of my own learning More motivated to learn Work at my own pace Review class materials whenever I want Share ideas with my classmates © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 39. Given the demand and the interest, what isstanding in the way of greater adoption?School site principals say the most significant barriers are:1. Concern about quality of student-teacher interaction2. Lack of technology infrastructure3. How to create rigorous courses4. How to evaluate the quality of purchased online courses5. Finding teachers interested and qualified to teach Source: Speak Up 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 40. CPS teachers value online learning for their ownprofessional development 49% have participated in a 100% online pd class or workshop 15% have participated in a blended online class 33% say that a fully online course is their preferred method for professional development; 16% vote for the blended model © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 41. How would you like your district to use technology tocreate a PLC? CPS teachers say: 1. Provide online courses (50%) 2. Provide tools so I can collaborate with other teachers at my school (40%) 3. Partner with higher ed to provide graduate level courses (48%) 4. Provide easy access to student data (42%) 5. Provide centralized repository of teaching resources (38%) © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 42. The New 3 E’s of Education:Enabled, Engaged, EmpoweredKey Trends: E-Textbooks & Digital Content © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 43. Designing the ultimate classroom Gr 6-8 Students Aspirations for Digital Content Internet access anywhere Online textbooks Adaptive learning software Online databases & videos Games Virtual reality 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Natl CPS © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 44. Students’ “speak up” about the ultimate mathclass CPS Students in Gr 6-8: Collaborate with classmates on problem solving 50% Ability to text my teacher with questions 46% I have a connection with my teacher 38% My teacher is excited about math 37% Access to online classes 33% Access to online tutors 32% Use online or video math games 31% Ability to use mobile devices to video problems 30% Access to online textbooks 26% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 45. Benefits of using digital contentPrincipals’ perspective:1. Increases student engagement2. Extends learning beyond the school day3. Prepares students for world of work4. Improves teachers’ skills with technology5. Decreases dependence on publishers © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 46. Given the demand and the interest, what isstanding in the way of greater adoption?Principals say the most significant barriers are:1. Lack of technology infrastructure2. Balancing instructional time constraints3. Lack of teachers’ skill with using digital content4. How to evaluate the quality of purchased digital content5. Locating free, standards aligned digital content Source: Speak Up 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 47. Teachers & professional development arounddigital content useTeachers’ top recommendations:1. Access to collection of vetted resources2. F2F professional development3. Video clips of teachers’ using digital content4. Professional learning community @school5. Online course © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 48. What is most important when evaluating quality ofdigital content?Administrators say:1. Student achievement (57%)2. Teacher evaluation (49%)3. Created by teachers (33%)4. Certified by ed org (32%)5. Source is content expert (32%)6. Conference demo (28%) © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 49. What is most important when evaluating quality ofdigital content?Administrators say: Teachers say:1. Student achievement 1. Created by teachers (55%) (57%) 2. Colleague referral (50%)2. Teacher evaluation (49%) 3. Teacher evaluation (42%)3. Created by teachers (33%) 4. Student achievement4. Certified by ed org (32%) (38%)5. Source is content expert 5. Certified by ed org (37%) (32%) 6. Source is content expert6. Conference demo (28%) (29%) © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 50. What is most important when evaluating quality ofdigital content?Administrators say: Teachers say:1. Student achievement 1. Created by teachers (55%) (57%) 2. Colleague referral (50%)2. Teacher evaluation (49%) 3. Teacher evaluation (42%)3. Created by teachers (33%) 4. Student achievement4. Certified by ed org (32%) (38%)5. Source is content expert 5. Certified by ed org (37%) (32%) 6. Source is content expert6. Conference demo (28%) (29%) © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 51. The Student Vision for Learning Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 52. What is the bottom line? Today’s studentswant learning that is: Enabled Engaging Empowered © Project Tomorrow 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 53. Today’s Discussion: The Big QuestionsWhat are the expectations of K-12 students for 21stcentury learning?How does that student vision compare with theteachers’ & administrators’ reality? What is theunique parent perspective on 21st century learning?How well are today’s K-12 schools meeting theexpectations of students?What are the emerging trends in learning that we allshould be watching? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 54. Key trends we are watching:• Continuing “digital disconnects”• Spectrum of digital native-ness• Multiple “computers” in the backpack• Adaptation trumps adoption• Anytime, anyplace, anywhere, any pace learning• Developing personal expert networks © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 55. Key trends we are watching:• Self directed learning for student & teacher• Everyone is a content developer• Make it relevant to me!• Blurring of informal & formal learning lines• Beyond engagement: it’s really about productivity!• “Long tail” of training & education © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 56. More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org• National Speak Up Findings and reports• Speak Up 2011 data: release to participating districts on Feb 1• Speak Up 2011 data: national release in April• Presentations, podcasts and webinars• Evaluation services & reports• Speak Up 2012! © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 57. Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT Copyright Project Tomorrow 2011.This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is grantedfor this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. © Project Tomorrow 2011

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