Su09 intel visionaryconference041610
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Su09 intel visionaryconference041610

on

  • 739 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
739
Views on SlideShare
737
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

2 Embeds 2

http://www.tomorrow.org 1
http://tomorrow.org 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Su09 intel visionaryconference041610 Su09 intel visionaryconference041610 Presentation Transcript

  • Intel’s Visionary Conference 2010 Technology @ the intersection of educational change Washington DC STEM: Students, Teachers, Education and More Speak Up 2009 National Findings Julie Evans Chief Executive Officer Project Tomorrow April 16, 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Why we are here . . . “I believe that the purpose of education is not to make men carpenters, but to make carpenters men. To be competitive in a workplace that is changing and will change continuously throughout our careers, my peers and I need to be able to read and understand new information at a level never before prevalent. This should be, however, a familiar aim for the forces of academia, however, since what we must learn, in essence, is to learn. I would ensure a broad and balanced education that exposes every student to rigorous inquiry in every discipline, from physics to pottery and makes them active participants in the process of inquiry and learning.” (11th grader, Pittsburgh PA) © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • What is Speak Up?  Annual national research project  Online surveys + focus groups  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Schools/districts/colleges get back their own data for planning and budgeting  Collect data ↔ Stimulate conversations  K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents and Administrators + Pre-Service Teachers  Inform policies & programs  Analysis and reporting – national reports, state reports, district reports  Services: custom reports, consulting with districts and state agencies  NCES back end database – provide statistically significant samplings  7 years of empowering authentic voices – since 2003:  1.6 million K-12 students  142,000 teachers 1.85 million respondents  82,000 parents  10,500 school leaders  23,000 schools – from all 50 states, DC, American military base schools, Canada, Mexico, Australia © Project Tomorrow 2010 View slide
  • Speak Up is facilitated annually by Project Tomorrow (formerly known as NetDay) Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org) is the leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education. © Project Tomorrow 2010 View slide
  • Speak Up 2009 survey question themes  Learning & Teaching with Technology  21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship  Math Instruction & Career Interests in STEM and Teaching  Professional Development  Internet Safety  Education Continuity – Administrators’ Challenges  Emerging Technologies in the Classroom  Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content / E- textbooks  Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications  Designing the 21st Century School © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Why do schools & districts participate in Speak Up? Collect unique data from stakeholders Give stakeholders a voice in national/state policy Support specific initiatives such as digital content, online learning, mobile devices, 1:1 programs or new teacher professional development programs Model for students the value of civic engagement and being part of a national discussion Recognition as an innovation leader Demonstrate to students, teachers and parents that their ideas are valued by their education leaders Understand the future of K-12 education © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Saluting our Speak Up 2009 Sponsors: © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Thank you to our 2009 National Champion Outreach Partners: And the 75+ other national education and business associations & nonprofit groups that promote Speak Up to their stakeholders, members & affiliates. © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • SU 2009 Congressional Briefing Washington DC March 16, 2010 Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Release of the Speak Up 2009 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents Report/presentation available online at : http://www.tomorrow.org/speakup/speakup_congress.h tml © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Save the Date: National Release of the 2009 Speak Up Data Findings from K-12 Teachers, Administrators and Pre-Service Teachers (new this year!) Wednesday, May 5, 2010 12 noon – 1:30 pm Rayburn House Office Building - Room Presentation of Findings B339 RSVP: National Speakers rsvp@tomorrow.org Panel of Educators 949-609-4660 x12 Discussion & Lunch © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Let’s now listen to the voices of our education stakeholders Speak Up 2009 Selected Data Findings © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • National Speak Up 2009 Participation: 370,565 surveys  K-12 Students 299,677  Teachers 38,642  Pre-Service Teachers 1,987  Parents (in English & Spanish) 26,312  School/District Administrators 3,947  Schools / Districts 5,757 / 1,215 Top Participating States (# of participants) Top 12: TX, AZ, AL, CA, FL, MD, PA, NC, AR, MO, NY, IL About Speak Up Schools:  97% public, 3% private  38% urban, 31% suburban, 32% rural  54% Title 1 eligible – indication of community poverty  42% majority-minority student population © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Sampling of Key Findings: Speak Up 2003 – 2009 + 1.85 million surveys from students, parents & educators  Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults  Students’ frustrations with the lack of technology use in school  Lack of relevancy in education exacerbated  Students function as a “Digital Advance Team”  Students adopt and adapt emerging technologies for learning  Introducing the “Free Agent Learner” © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Result: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision  Social–based learning  Un–tethered learning  Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Three Essential Elements  Social–based learning Students want to leverage emerging communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students are "Free Agent" Learners: Using technology tools on their own for learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students’ use of technology for communication and collaboration outside of school © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students’ use of collaboration and communications tools for school work Communicate 51% with students Collaborate 34% through profile Communicate 28% with teachers Post to blogs 12% wikis Tweet or post a 11% G9-12 microblog Participate in G6-8 10% online G3-5 Get help from an 8% online tutor Work with 7% students from Participate in 7% videoconferences 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Three Essential Elements  Un–tethered learning Students envision technology-enabled learning that transcends classroom walls © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Mobile Devices: Students have personal access to a variety of electronic devices – even our youngest students! 85% i Pod 74% Des ktop 70% Laptop 67% Cel l phone 42% Fl i p camera 31% Smart phone 6% Di gi tal Reader 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100 % K-2 G3-5 G6-8 G9-12 © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students’ suggested use of mobile devices for learning purposes Look up information on Internet 70% Take notes or record lectures 56% Work on projects with classmates 55% G9-12 Access online textbooks 48% G6-8 Take videos of class presentations or 37% experiments Play educational games 31% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students believe that mobile devices can also enhance personal productivity Communicate with classmates 64% Receive reminders & alerts 58% Organize schoolwork 53% Communicate with teachers 52% Learn about school activities 44% G9-12 Access social networking 43% 42% G6-8 Create/share documents or media Upload/download to portal 40% Coordinate calendars 37% Share/Edit bookmarks 29% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students face obstacles using technology at school Top responses: 1. I cannot use my mobile device (51%) 2. School filters and firewalls block websites I need (48%) 3. Teachers limit our technology use (34%) 4. Too many rules! (27%)  Cannot access my communications tools  Rules that limit use of my school’s technology © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  How schools could make it easier to use technology – the student point of view Students say: 1. Let me use my own mobile device (58%) 2. Give me unlimited Internet access on campus (41%) 3. Let me use my own laptop (41%) 4. Access my school projects from any computer – home or at school (40%) 5. I want to access my social networking site and communications tools (36%) © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Teachers’ beliefs about the potential benefits of using mobile devices for instructional purposes Increases student engagement 50% Prepares students for world of work 40% Extends school day for learning 36% Improves teacher-parent-student communications 36% Personalizes instruction 29% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Parents’ beliefs about the potential benefits of using mobile devices for instructional purposes Increases student engagement 43% Prepares students for world of work 41% Extends school day for learning 38% Provides access to online textbooks 37% Improves teacher-parent-student communications 35% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Parents’ willingness to purchase mobile devices for their child to use at school © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Three Essential Elements  Digitally–rich learning Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key to education productivity © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students’ use of digital resources for schoolwork 34% Take tests online 19% Turn in paper for plagiarism check 10% Get help from tutor 21% Conduct virtual experiments 29% Play educational games 66% Create slide shows, videos or web pages 33% Use online textbooks G9-12th 27% G6-8th Upload assignments to school portal 10% G3-5th Listen to a podcast 0% 30% 60% 90% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students use of digital resources outside of school Upload/download media 65% Participate in online games 51% Create or modify digital media 40% Create new media from existing 25% G9-12th Contribute to a blog 20% G6-8th G3-5th Participate in 3D virtual reality 18% Share resources 14% Contribute to a wiki 13% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Digitally-rich learning  Students’ desires for the features and functionality of online textbooks What do they want in an online textbook?  “Make it interactive and relevant”  “Use it to facilitate collaboration”  “Personalize it for my learning” © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students want their online textbooks to be interactive and relevant 53% Games to expl ore i deas 55% Onl i ne tutors Li nks to real -ti me data & 51% websi tes 53% G9-12 Ani mati ons & si mul ati ons G6-8 46% Vi deo cl i ps G3-5 44% Vi rtual l abs 36% Expert Podcasts 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students want their online textbooks to have tools that facilitate collaboration with peers and experts Communicate 63% with classmates Create 44% podcasts/videos G9-12 Collaboration 42% G6-8 Tools G3-5 Webcams/Video 34% Conferencing 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  •  Students want to use their digital textbooks to personalize learning – make it work for me! © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Imagine you are designing the ultimate school for 21st century learners. Which of these technology tools or strategies do you think holds the greatest potential for increasing student achievement and success? © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Top responses in 2009: Students design the ultimate school for 21st century learning  Communications tools (60%)  Collaboration tools (51%)  Digital media tools (60%)  Digital resources (51%)  Games and simulations  Mobile devices (51%) (60%)  Tools to help organize  Online textbooks (57%) schoolwork (49%)  Mobile computer for every  Campus wide Internet access student (57%) (49%)  Interactive whiteboards (53%)  Online classes (48%) © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision  Social–based learning  Un–tethered learning  Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Why is it important to learn math? I don't like math Not important Get into college Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Develop PS & CT skills Gr 3-5 To earn good grades I might want a job 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Why do parents think math is important to their child’s success?  To develop problem solving and critical thinking skills 75%  To be successful in a future job 65%  To help my child get into college 49% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration How do you want to learn math? Solving real world problems Teacher is excited Tech games Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Help other students Discuss with classmates Textbook problems Simulations/animations 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Interest in STEM Careers Maybe/somewhat interested Gr 9-12 Yes, interested Gr 6-8 Not interested 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Yes, I am interested: What would increase your interest in a STEM career? Summer career exploration programs After school programs Competitions College scholarships © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Yes, I am interested: What would increase your interest in a STEM career? Summer career exploration programs After school programs Competitions College scholarships Somewhat/maybe interested: What would increase your interest in a STEM career? Meeting successful role models Talk to professionals and visit companies Work with mentors Day in the Life videos and podcasts © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Math and STEM Career Exploration Parents: Which of these areas are you likely to encourage your child to pursue a career?  Science 51%  Math 35%  Engineering 44%  Technology 49%  Teaching 28% © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org Webinars, podcasts and reports such as: National Speak Up 2009 Findings Students and Parents – available now Teachers, Administrators, Pre-service teachers – May 5th Learning in the 21st Century: A National Report of Online Learning (Oct 2007, Updated Jun 2008, 2009) Inspiring the Next Generation of Innovators: Students, Teachers and Parents Speak Up about Science Education (Jun 2008) Leadership in the 21st Century: The New Visionary Administrator (Oct 2008) Parents’ Perspectives, Parents’ Priorities (Oct 2009) © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Thank you! More data and reports are available on our website: www.tomorrow.org Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Copyright Project Tomorrow 2010. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. © Project Tomorrow 2010