Speak Up ISTE Presentation Mobile Devices Web Usage 06/28/10
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Speak Up ISTE Presentation Mobile Devices Web Usage 06/28/10 Speak Up ISTE Presentation Mobile Devices Web Usage 06/28/10 Presentation Transcript

  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Mobile Devices + Web 2.0 = Engaged and Empowered Learners Students, Parents & Educators Speak Up About Emerging Technologies Speak Up 2009 National Findings Julie Evans Project Tomorrow [email_address]
  • Today’s Discussion: The Big Questions
    • What are the expectations of today’s students for the use of mobile devices and Web 2.0 tools within education?
    • How does this student vision compare with the educators’ vision ?
    • What challenges or obstacles do educators face in implementing these technologies? What are the benefits?
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Today’s Agenda:
    • What is Speak Up?
    • Selected Data Findings
    • Panel Discussion with our Experts
    • Conversation Time
    Speak Up Research Project: Views of Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators & Pre-Service Teachers
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Introducing our Expert Panel Camilla Gagliolo Arlington Public Schools, Virginia Catherine Wyman Xavier College Preparatory, Arizona Carl Anderson Goodhue Public Schools, Minnesota Tim Wilson Osseo Area Schools, Minnesota
    • Annual national research project
      • Online surveys + focus groups
      • Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education
      • Schools/districts/colleges get back their own data for planning and budgeting
    • Collect data ↔ Stimulate conversations
      • K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents and Administrators + Pre-Service Teachers
    • Inform policies & programs
      • Analysis and reporting – national reports, state reports, district reports
      • Services: custom reports, consulting with districts and state agencies
      • NCES back end database – provide statistically significant samplings
    • 7 years of empowering authentic voices – since 2003:
      • 1.6 million K-12 students
      • 142,000 teachers
      • 82,000 parents
      • 10,500 school leaders
      • 23,000 schools – from all 50 states, DC, American military base schools, Canada, Mexico, Australia
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What is Speak Up? 1.85 million respondents
    • Speak Up is facilitated annually
    • by Project Tomorrow
    • (formerly known as NetDay)
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org) is the leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education.
      • Learning & Teaching with Technology
      • 21 st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship
      • Science and Math Instruction
      • Career Interests in STEM and Teaching
      • Professional Development / Teacher Preparation
      • Internet Safety
      • Administrators’ Challenges
      • Emerging Technologies in the Classroom
        • Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content
        • Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications
      • Designing the 21st Century School
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Speak Up survey question themes
    • Collect unique data from stakeholders
    • Give stakeholders a voice in national/state policy
    • Support specific initiatives such as digital content, online learning, mobile devices, 1:1 programs or new teacher professional development programs
    • Model for students the value of civic engagement and being part of a national discussion
    • Recognition as an innovation leader
    • Demonstrate to students, teachers and parents that their ideas are valued by their education leaders
    • Understand the future of K-12 education
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Why do schools & districts participate in Speak Up?
  • Saluting our Speak Up 2009 Sponsors: © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Thank you to our K-12 National Champion Outreach Partners: © Project Tomorrow 2010 And the 75+ other national education and business associations & nonprofit groups that promote Speak Up to their stakeholders, members & affiliates.
  • Thanks for the use of the classroom tools today! © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Activities, Attitudes & Aspirations
    • Disconnects & Differences
    • Trends & Leverage Points
    • Today’s Focus: Mobile Devices & Web 2.0 Tools
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Voices of Education Stakeholders - Speak Up 2009
    • K-12 Students 299,677
    • Teachers 38,642
    • Parents (in English & Spanish) 26,312
    • School/District Administrators 3,947
    • Schools / Districts 5,757 / 1,215
    • Pre-Service Teachers 1,987
    • Schools of Education 71
    • Participating States = all 50 states
      • Top 12 (# of participants):
      • TX, AZ, AL, CA, FL, MD, PA, NC, AR, MO, NY, IL
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 National Speak Up 2009 Participation: 370,565
      • About our K-12 Schools:
          • 97% public, 3% private
          • 38% urban, 31% suburban, 32% rural
          • 54% Title 1 eligible – indicating community poverty
          • 42% majority-minority student population
      • About our Schools of Education/Aspiring Teachers
          • 89% four year public institutions
          • 2/3 undergraduates; 1/3 graduate students
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 National Speak Up 2009 Participation: 370,565
    • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Speak Up 2009 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents
    • Unleashing the Future:
    • Educators Speak Up about the Use of Emerging Technologies for Learning
    • Speak Up 2009 National Findings: Teachers, Aspiring Teachers & Administrators
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Release of two national reports March 16 and May 5, 2010 Both are available at www.tomorrow.org
  • Sampling of Key Findings: Speak Up 2003 – 2009
    • Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults
    • Students’ frustrations with the lack of technology use in school
    • Lack of relevancy in education exacerbated
    • Students function as a “Digital Advance Team”
    • Students adopt and adapt emerging technologies for learning
    • Introducing the “Free Agent Learner”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Introducing the “Digital Advance Team” Today’s K-12 Students Adopting/adapting technologies for learning Tech trend setters Their use predicts widespread acceptance Out of school use drives in school use Pace car for others Teachers ultimately catch up
  • Result: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision
      • Digitally–rich learning
      • Un–tethered learning
      • Social–based learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Digitally–rich learning
        • Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key to education productivity
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Un–tethered learning
        • Students envision technology-enabled learning that transcends classroom walls
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Social–based learning
        • Students want to leverage emerging communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Mobile Devices + Web 2.0 = Engaged and Empowered Learners
      • Student Vision:
      • Digitally–rich learning
      • Un–tethered learning
      • Social–based learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Warm Up Exercise © Project Tomorrow 2010 Imagine you are going to spend a month on a deserted island. What is the one “ mobile technology” you would need to have with you? Yes, solar power re-charging stations will be available on your island.
  • Warm Up Exercise – Choose one © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Smart phone
    • Handheld video game player
    • Laptop
    • Digital reader
    • MP3 player
    • Handheld latte frother
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 K-12 students have a lot of personal devices that they would like to use for schoolwork Personal device K-2 Gr 3-5 Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 Laptop 27% 32% 53% 70% Cell phone 17% 29% 59% 67% Smart phone 14% 17% 24% 31% MP 3 35% 55% 80% 85%
    • Students face obstacles using technology at school
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Top responses from students:
    • I cannot use my mobile device (56%)
    • School filters and firewalls block websites I need (53%)
    • Teachers limit our technology use (37%)
    • Too many rules! (30%)
        • Cannot access my communications tools
        • Rules that limit use of my school’s technology
    • How schools could make it easier to use technology – the student point of view
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students say:
    • Let me use my own mobile device (64%)
    • Let me use my own laptop (46%)
    • Give me unlimited Internet access on campus (45%)
    • Access my school projects from any computer – home or at school (44%)
    • I want to access my social networking site tools (39%)
    • Access school network from my device (38%)
    • Do students with smart phones have different expectations?
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Audience response Students: How would using mobile devices at school help you with your schoolwork? Besides communications and research, what do students say?
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Audience response Besides communications and research, how do students say that using “mobile devices” in school will help them with schoolwork?
    • Choose top response:
    • Access social networking site
    • Access online textbooks
    • Learn about school activities
    • Share documents, videos and podcasts
    • Receive reminders and alerts
    • Take videos of class presentations or labs to review later
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Besides communications and research, how do students say that using “mobile devices” in school will help them with schoolwork? Access social networking site 35% Access online textbooks 44% Learn about school activities 41% Share documents, videos and podcasts 36% Receive reminders and alerts 55% Take videos of class presentations or labs 39%
    • Value Proposition: Enhance personal productivity
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Value Proposition: Enhance learning potential
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Self-directed learning: how students are using web based tools to improve their own education
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Found info on the Internet 46% Sought help thru Facebook 26% Tutored other students 24% Took an online assessment 23% Listen/watch podcasts and videos 23% Used a cell phone app to get organized 19% Found experts to answer my questions 13% Started a wiki or blog 9% Created a video or podcast to share info 8%
  • What is the value proposition for technology in education? The Educators’ Perspective © Project Tomorrow 2010 Unleashing the Future: Educators Speak Up about the Use of Emerging Technologies for Learning
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Audience response Who do you think is most “bullish” on the importance of effective use of technology for student success? (Besides students!)
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Audience response Who do you think is most “bullish” on the importance of effective use of technology for student success? (Besides students!) Teachers District administrators School principals
  • What is the value proposition for technology in education? © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Teachers’ beliefs about the potential benefits of using mobile devices for instructional purposes
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Increases student engagement 56% Prepares students for world of work 45% Extends school day for learning 41% Improves teacher-parent-student communications 40% Personalizes instruction 33%
    • Teachers’ biggest concern about using
    • mobile devices at school
    • While 56% of teachers say that the greatest benefit to using mobile devices:
            • increases student engagement in school and learning
            • Biggest concern however is students will be distracted doing other things (texting, surfing, games).
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Concerns about using mobile devices at school
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Administrators’ perspectives on mobile devices
    • within learning
    • 66% of administrators say that the greatest benefit to using mobile devices:
            • increases student engagement in school and learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Administrators’ perspectives on mobile devices
    • within learning
    • What prevents administrators from allowing students to use their own devices?
          • Current district policies (49%)
          • Concerns about theft (47%)
          • Concerns about network security (47%)
          • Teachers are not trained (45%)
          • Digital equity concerns (42%)
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Administrators’ perspectives on mobile devices
    • within learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Parents’ willingness to purchase mobile devices for their child to use at school © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Imagine you are designing the ultimate school. Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact on learning?
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Imagine you are designing the ultimate school. Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact on learning? Are we all on the same page?
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Audience response Which stakeholder group do you think had the largest percentage increase in regular use of a social networking site from 2008 to 2009?
    • Choose top response:
    • Middle school students (Grades 6-8)
    • High school students (Grades 9-12)
    • Parents
    • Teachers
    • Administrators
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Which stakeholder group do you think had the largest increase in regular use of a social networking site from 2008 to 2009?
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision
      • Social–based learning
      • Un–tethered learning
      • Digitally–rich learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Unleashing the Future: Educators “Speak Up” about the use of Emerging Technologies for Learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Unleashing the Future: Educators “Speak Up” about the use of Emerging Technologies for Learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Unleashing the Future: Educators “Speak Up” about the use of Emerging Technologies for Learning © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Introducing our Expert Panel Camilla Gagliolo Arlington Public Schools, Virginia Catherine Wyman Xavier College Preparatory, Arizona Carl Anderson Goodhue Public Schools, Minnesota Tim Wilson Osseo Area Schools, Minnesota
    • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Speak Up 2009 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents
    • Unleashing the Future:
    • Educators Speak Up about the Use of Emerging Technologies for Learning
    • Speak Up 2009 National Findings: Teachers, Aspiring Teachers & Administrators
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Release of two national reports March 16 and May 5, 2010 Download at www.tomorrow.org
    • National Speak Up Findings
    • Additional data analysis from Speak Up 2009
    • Presentations, podcasts and webinars
    • Reports and white papers
    • Information about other services
    • Information about Speak Up 2010
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
    • Tomorrow:
    • New report to be released at ISTE 2010 on Tuesday on online learning trends and findings from Speak Up 2009 National Findings
    • In the fall:
    • New report on mobile learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Online surveys available for: K-12 students Parents (in Spanish too!) Teachers Administrators Pre-service teachers Surveys open for input: October 2010 Plan now to participate in Speak Up 2010! Free online report for all Speak Up participating districts w/ your local data: Feb 2011 Release of National Speak Up Findings in Congressional Briefings: Spring 2011 No fee to participate. No limit on the # of surveys submitted. 100% confidential.
  • Leveraging a unique asset – the ideas of your students! © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • 82% of students would like to be more
    • involved and share their ideas
    • Have class discussions
    • Give input through Speak Up and other surveys
    • Share ideas online with other students
    • Be part of a club that researches problems & presents ideas
    • Be part of a student advisory group for the principal
    • Set up a blog and wiki to share ideas
    • Make presentations to the school board
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow [email_address] 949-609-4660 x15 Copyright Project Tomorrow 2010. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.