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Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session
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Online Learning Institute - Keynote Session

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  • 1. Creating a new digital learning playbook: Speak Up 2013 National Findings Julie Evans, Project Tomorrow CEO
  • 2. Today’s Discussion:  About Speak Up 2013  Myth-busting  Alignment of goals  A new digital disconnect?  Trends for your consideration Speak Up 2013 National Research Project: Views of K-12 Students, Parents, Teachers, Librarians and Administrators (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 3. ProjectTomorrow, a national education nonprofit organization Programs: • Research & evaluation studies • STEM education programs • Advocacy for digital learning (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Mission: To ensure that today’s students are prepared to become tomorrow’s leaders, innovators and engaged citizens of the world.
  • 4. Annual national research project  Using online surveys + focus groups  Surveys for: K-12 Students,Teachers, Parents, Administrators, Community Members  Special: Pre-ServiceTeachers in Schools of Education  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Schools, districts & colleges receive free report with their own data Inform policies, plans & programs  Local: your stakeholder data  State: state level data  Federal: national findings Speak Up National Research Project + 3.4 million surveys since 2003 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 5.  Learning & Teaching with Technology  21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship & Global Awareness  Math and Science Instruction / Digital Writing  Students’ Career Interests in STEM  Professional Development / Teacher Preparation  Internet Safety / Digital Footprints  Administrators’ Challenges / Bandwidth Capacity  Emerging Technologies both in & out of the Classroom  Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content, E-texts  Educational Games, Social Media tools and applications  Flipped Classroom, Print to Digital, Online Assessments  Designing the 21st Century School Speak Up survey question themes (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 6. K-12 Students 325,279 Teachers & Librarians 32,151 Parents (in English & Spanish) 39,986 School/District Administrators 4,530 Community Members (new this year!) 1,346 About the participating schools & districts o 9,005 schools and 2,710 districts o 90% public schools – 10% private/parochial/charter/other o 32% urban / 31% rural / 37% suburban o 30% school wide Title 1; 43% majority minority school o All 50 states + DC + Guam + DODEA schools National Speak Up 2013 Participation: 403,292 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 7. Why do schools and districts participate in Speak Up? .  Power of local data  Use data as input for planning  To justify budget and purchasing decisions  Inform new initiatives – as an evaluation tool  As a tool to engage parents  Use for grant writing and fund development  Content for professional development  To create a new digital learning playbook (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 8. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Speak Up 2013 National Reports www.tomorrow.org
  • 9. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook – Myth-busting
  • 10. Commonly heard education mythology “New teachers don’t need any training in how to use technology within teaching” “Parents won’t accept online textbooks” “Online learning undercuts the role of the teacher.” “There is so much great content online for teachers to use in the classroom – so, what is the problem?” “Just put technology XYZ in the classroom and magically students will learn more!” “Parents are ready for the Common Core, and eager to support it.” (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 11. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Three truths and a lie
  • 12. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Practice round How and where did Julie break her wrist?
  • 13. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Practice round How and where did Julie break her wrist? 1. In Wilmington, North Carolina 2. Outside of a restaurant 3. Result of wild kangaroo attack 4. On way to meet with district team to talk about their new digital learning initiative Which one is the lie?
  • 14. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Practice round How and where did Julie break her wrist? 1. In Wilmington, North Carolina 2. Outside of a restaurant 3. Result of wild kangaroo attack 4. On way to meet with district team to talk about their new digital learning initiative X
  • 15. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Let’s test our digital learning myth-busting skills Which one is the lie?
  • 16. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Let’s test our digital learning myth-busting skills Which one is the lie? 1. Administrators place a high premium on increasing teacher effectiveness to drive better student outcomes. 2. When asked to identify the best device for multiple academic tasks, students chose a laptop over a tablet. 3. Students in traditional schools are more likely than students in virtual schools to say that their school cares about them. 4. Teachers believe that the use of digital content can promote critical thinking and problem solving skill development.
  • 17. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook – Goal alignment
  • 18. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 What's waking up district administrators in the middle of the night? 1. Adequate funding (58%) 2. Closing the achievement gap (40%) 3. Staff morale (40%) 4. Adequate technology (39%) 5. Use of technology within instruction (36%) 6. Using data to inform instruction (33%) 7. Integration of 21st century skill development (29%)
  • 19. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 District administrators’ views: what has greatest potential to impact student success? 1. Enhancing teacher effectiveness 2. Integrating 21st century skills into curriculum 3. Leveraging technology more effectively  Digital content  Blended learning  Tablets and other mobile devices  1:1 programs  Online textbooks  Flipped learning models  Online classes
  • 20. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 What skills are most important for students to develop to ensure their future success? Ability to learn independently Ability with diverse set of people Being creative and thinking outside the box Critical thinking and problem solving skills Effective communications through writing Teamwork and collaboration skills Technology skills
  • 21. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 CollegeandWorkplaceSkills District Administrators Teachers Parents Community Members Criticalthinkingandproblemsolvingskills 91% 75% 85% 88% Abilitytoworkwithadiversesetofpeople 86% 69% 71% 82% Teamworkandcollaborationskills 83% 66% 69% 79% Abilitytolearnindependently 82% 77% 67% 79% Technologyskills 80% 52% 69% 80% Effectivecommunicationsthroughwriting 76% 55% 68% Beingcreativeandthinkingoutsidethebox 75% 62% 72% 77% Financialliteracy 79% Defining college and career ready skills: ranking of importance for students
  • 22. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 CollegeandWorkplaceSkills District Administrators Teachers Parents Community Members Criticalthinkingandproblemsolvingskills 91% 75% 85% 88% Abilitytoworkwithadiversesetofpeople 86% 69% 71% 82% Teamworkandcollaborationskills 83% 66% 69% 79% Abilitytolearnindependently 82% 77% 67% 79% Technologyskills 80% 52% 69% 80% Effectivecommunicationsthroughwriting 76% 55% 68% Beingcreativeandthinkingoutsidethebox 75% 62% 72% 77% Financialliteracy 79% Defining college and career ready skills: ranking of importance for students Technology skills Linkage to student success?
  • 23. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 42% 59% 42% 41% 56% 36% 56% 57% Parents of high school students High School Teachers High School Principals District Administrators Not important Important Extremely important How important is the effective implementation of technology within instruction on student success?
  • 24. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Alignment of goals with actual practice College and career ready skills What administrators say is important What students say they are actually learning Ability to work with a diverse group of people 86% 58% Critical thinking and problem solving 91% 57% Teamwork and collaboration 83% 56% Ability to learn independently 82% 55% Technology skills 80% 53%
  • 25. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook – Current practices
  • 26. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Current uses of technology Four types of technology usage for learning  In school: o teacher directed or sponsored o student self – initiated to support learning  Out of school time: o doing assignments and homework o supporting personal learning
  • 27. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Digital Activity Elementary School Grades 3-5 Middle School Grades 6-8 High School Grades 9-12 Access class information through online portal 31% 68% 75% Take tests online 44% 47% 52% Use online textbooks 14% 32% 37% Use a mobile device provided by school 25% 30% 32% Watch teacher created videos 14% 22% 22% Students’ Use ofTeacher-FacilitatedTechnology in the Classroom
  • 28. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Teachers’ use of digital tools for professional tasks Teachers who self assess their skills as “advanced” compared to peers:  Internet research to info a lesson (90%)  Watch an online video to learn something (74%)  Text with colleagues (67%)  Customize digital content for class use (56%)  Participate in online PLC (55%)
  • 29. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Teachers’ use of digital content in the classroom 14% 52% 32% 32% 21% 63% 12% 18% 13% 39% 23% 42% 8% 17% 14% 24% 15% 46% Videos that I create Animations Real time data Online textbooks Game environments Videos that I find online English teachers Math teachers Science teachers
  • 30. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Teachers’ use of digital content in the classroom “Use of digital content helps students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills” 2009: 27% of classroom teachers 2013: 38% of classroom teachers
  • 31. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Current uses of technology Four types of technology usage for learning  In school: o teacher directed or sponsored o student self – initiated to support learning  Out of school time: o doing assignments and homework o supporting personal learning
  • 32. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 21% 50% 73% 89% 41% 62% 66% 66% 41% 58% 61% 50% 18% 39% 48% 39% Gr K-2 Gr 3-5 Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 Digital Reader Tablet Laptop Smartphone K-12 Students’ Personal Access to Mobile Devices
  • 33. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 “What mobile device I use depends upon the task” Read a book? Take notes in class? Use social media? Create content? Different tools for different tasks
  • 34. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Social media: tools to connect, collaborate, create Texting: 2/3rds of students Gr 6-12 (growth of 37% since 2008) Twitter: 28% of students in Gr 9-12 Creating videos: 28% of students in Gr 6-8 only 15% in 2007
  • 35. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Massively multi-player online games (MMOG) ¼ of students in Gr 6-8 Facebook 39% of students in Gr 9-12 decrease of 41% since 2007 Social media: tools to connect, collaborate, create
  • 36. What do students say are the benefits of playing educational games? . (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Benefits of Games Students K-2 Students Gr 3-5 Students Gr 6-8 Students Gr 9-12 Helps me understand difficult learning concepts 57% 48% 56% 48% School would be more fun 48% 43% 52% 44% Games engage me in learning 43% 40% 47% 43% Learn more about a subject 49% 44% 39% 31%
  • 37. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 15% 18% 31% 40% 49% 56% 13% 21% 22% 38% 50% 46% Tweeted about an academic topic Found an expert online to answer questions Used online writing tools Watched a video to help with homework Played an online game to learn something Researched a website to learn more about a topic Boys Girls Middle School Students’ Use of DigitalTools for Self-Directed Learning Outside of School (AdvancedTechnology Users)
  • 38. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook – New digital disconnect?
  • 39. Who is your primary audience for online learning? (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Audience % of Principals Teachers 24% Administrators 20% At risk students 20% Advanced students 19% Students in continuation or alternative schools 14%
  • 40. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Increased access to online learning in schools 41% of high schools offering online classes for students in:  Math  Science  History  English/Language Arts 1/3 of high schools offering classes inWorld Languages Only 17% report not offering any online classes
  • 41. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Why online learning? High School Principals Provide academic remediation 66% Keep students engaged in staying in school 63% Provide options for students that need credit recovery 61% Provide options for home-bound students 53% Provide options for at risk students 50% Provides students with options for advanced coursework 49% Provide options for gifted students 41% Provides students with dual enrollment options with local colleges 39% How online learning is supporting the needs of many types of students
  • 42. Middle school students’ interest in online learning Articulating the advantages of personalized learning: To work at my own pace 52% I would be in control of my learning 52% To get extra help in a tough subject 47% It will make it easier for me to succeed 42% I could review materials whenever I needed 41% I would be more motivated to learn 38% (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 43. Students’ perspectives on school (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 44. Students’ perspectives on school (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 45. Students’ perspectives on school (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 46. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Perceived benefits of technology use for students Teaching in an online class Teaching using digital content Teaching in a 1:1 mobile class Developing creativity 50% 44% 49% Developing problem solving and critical thinking skills 57% 44% 45% Taking ownership of their learning 57% 35% 37% Learning to work collaboratively 30% 34% 37% Understanding how to apply academic concepts to real world problems 58% 37% 42% Increased motivation to learn 50% 60% 55% How has use of technology in your classroom enhanced student skills and success?
  • 47. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook –  Myth-busting  Aligning goals  Understanding current practices  Valuing student aspirations
  • 48. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Let’s test our digital learning myth-busting skills Which one is the lie? 1. Administrators place a high premium on increasing teacher effectiveness to drive better student outcomes. 2. When asked to identify the best device for multiple academic tasks, students chose a laptop over a tablet. 3. Students in traditional schools are more likely than students in virtual schools to say that their school cares about them. 4. Teachers believe that the use of digital content can promote critical thinking and problem solving skill development.
  • 49. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Let’s test our digital learning myth-busting skills Which one is the lie? 1. Administrators place a high premium on increasing teacher effectiveness to drive better student outcomes. 2. When asked to identify the best device for multiple academic tasks, students chose a laptop over a tablet. 3. Students in traditional schools are more likely than students in virtual schools to say that their school cares about them. 4. Teachers believe that the use of digital content can promote critical thinking and problem solving skill development. X
  • 50. National Speak Up Findings and reports Targeted and thematic reports Digital learning trends Mobile learning & social media Print to digital migration Social learning Intelligent adaptive software Digital parent series Presentations, podcasts and webinars Services: consulting, workshops, evaluation and efficacy studies Speak Up 2014 opens on October 6 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
  • 51. Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT SpeakUpEd Copyright Project Tomorrow 2014 This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014

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