Much Ado about Digital Content: What do the Students Say?
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Much Ado about Digital Content: What do the Students Say? Presentation Transcript

  • 1. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Much Ado about Digital Content: What Do the Students Say? Speak Up 2010 • National Findings Julie Evans Chief Executive Officer Project Tomorrow
  • 2. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Today’s Discussion: The Big Questions • What are the expectations of K-12 students for leveraging digital content for learning? • How are teachers, librarians and administrators addressing this student vision for digital content? • What are the barriers and the opportunities? • What does the e-textbook discussion tell us about the future of teaching and learning?
  • 3. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Discussion Agenda:  About the Speak Up Project  Digital content and e-textbooks  K-12 Students  Teachers and Librarians  Administrators  Panel Discussion with Our Experts  Conversation – your insights!
  • 4. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Our Expert Panel Students: Nathan Kosmin Springfield PA Lauren McCuen Springfield PA Kiera Ochsner Phoenix AZ Educators: Joquetta Johnson Baltimore MD Jared Mader Red Lion PA John Quinn Baltimore MD Ben Smith Red Lion PA Catherine Wyman Phoenix AZ
  • 5. © Project Tomorrow 2011 • Annual national research project  Online surveys + focus groups  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Institutions receive free report with their own data • Collect ideas ↔ Stimulate conversations  K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators, Librarians  Pre-Service Teachers in Schools of Education • Inform policies & programs  Analysis and reporting of findings and trends  Consulting services to help transform teaching and learning Speak Up National Research Project
  • 6. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Empowering authentic voices – since 2003:  1.9 million K-12 students  180,000 teachers and librarians  124,000 parents  15,500 school and district leaders  30,000 K-12 schools – from all 50 states, DC, American military base schools, Canada, Mexico, Australia, int’l schools . . . Speak Up National Research Project 2.2 million respondents
  • 7. © Project Tomorrow 2011  Learning & Teaching with Technology  21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship  Science and Math Instruction  Career Interests in STEM and Teaching  Professional Development / Teacher Preparation  Internet Safety  Administrators’ Challenges  Emerging Technologies in the Classroom  Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content  Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications  Designing the 21st Century School Speak Up survey question themes
  • 8. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Saluting our Speak Up 2010 Sponsors:
  • 9. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Many thanks to our K-12 National Champion Outreach Partners:
  • 10. © Project Tomorrow 2011  K-12 Students 294,399  Teachers 35,525  Librarians 2,135  Parents (in English & Spanish) 42,267  School/District Administrators 3,578  Technology Leaders 1,391  Schools / Districts 6,541 / 1,340 Participating States for Student Surveys: 48 states Top 12 (# of participants): TX, CA, AL, AZ, FL, NC, IL, MD, IN, NV, PA, WI National Speak Up 2010 Participation: 379,355
  • 11. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning
  • 12. © Project Tomorrow 2011 The New 3 E’s of Education: Enabled, Engaged, Empowered Report #1: How today’s students are leveraging emerging technologies for learning Report #2: How today’s educators are advancing a new vision for teaching and learning Speak Up 2010 National Findings Two national releases in Washington DC April 1 and May 11, 2011
  • 13. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What can the Speak Up findings tell us about the future of learning?
  • 14. © Project Tomorrow 2011 • Student vision for tech use mirrors desires for learning in general • Educators have potential to enable, engage and empower this new learning vision • By examining the synergies and the disconnects we can develop a shared vision for the future of learning What can the Speak Up data tell us about the future of learning?
  • 15. © Project Tomorrow 2011 The New 3 E’s of Education: Enabled, Engaged, Empowered Key Trends to Watch:  Mobile Learning  Online and Blended Learning  E-Textbooks and Digital Content
  • 16. © Project Tomorrow 2011 The New 3 E’s of Education: Enabled, Engaged, Empowered Key Trends: E-Textbooks & Digital Content
  • 17. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Inside today’s classroom How Students are Using Digital Content for Schoolwork 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Listen to podcasts Participate in virtual reality worlds Use e-textbooks Conduct virtual experiments/simulations Play educational games Create presentations and media Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Gr 3-5
  • 18. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Best use of technology – in what class? High school students say: 1. English / Language Arts 2. Science 3. Math 4. Social Studies / History
  • 19. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Inside today’s classroom: teachers’ view Digital Content in the Classroom 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Virtual Labs Simulations Virtual Field Trips Animations Educational Games Real-time Data E-Textbooks Podcasts/Videos Teachers: Usage
  • 20. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Inside today’s classroom: teachers + librarians Digital Content in the Classroom 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Virtual Labs Simulations Virtual Field Trips Animations Educational Games Real-time Data E-Textbooks Podcasts/Videos Librarians: Recommend Teachers: Usage
  • 21. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Inside today’s classroom: + administrators Digital Content in the Classroom 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Virtual Labs Simulations Virtual Field Trips Animations Educational Games Real-time Data E-Textbooks Podcasts/Videos Administrators: Value Librarians: Recommend Teachers: Usage
  • 22. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Value proposition of digital content: Administrators’ perspective Top benefits: 1. Increases student engagement 2. Extends learning beyond the school day 3. Prepares students for world of work 4. Improves teachers’ skills with technology 5. Decreases dependence on publishers
  • 23. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Barriers to implementing more digital content in classrooms Administrators say: 1. Digital equity concerns 47% 2. Teacher skill concerns 43% 3. How to evaluate quality 35% 4. Need content aligned to standards 28% 5. Legal concerns 26%
  • 24. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What is most important when evaluating quality of digital content? Administrators say: 1. Student achievement (61%) 2. Teacher evaluation (52%) 3. Created by teachers (40%) 4. Certified by ed org (36%) 5. On state ed dept list (34%) 6. Conference demo (33%) 7. Colleague referral (17%)
  • 25. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What is most important when evaluating quality of digital content? Administrators say: 1. Student achievement (61%) 2. Teacher evaluation (52%) 3. Created by teachers (40%) 4. Certified by ed org (36%) 5. On state ed dept list (34%) 6. Conference demo (33%) 7. Created by content experts (30%) Teachers say: 1. Created by teachers (56%) 2. Colleague referral (53%) 3. Teacher evaluation (40%) 4. Certified by ed org (37%) 5. Student achievement (35%) 6. Conference demo (30%) 7. Created by content experts (28%)
  • 26. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What is most important when evaluating quality of digital content? Administrators say: 1. Student achievement (61%) 2. Teacher evaluation (52%) 3. Created by teachers (40%) 4. Certified by ed org (36%) 5. On state ed dept list (34%) 6. Conference demo (33%) 7. Created by content experts (30%) Teachers say: 1. Created by teachers (56%) 2. Colleague referral (53%) 3. Teacher evaluation (40%) 4. Certified by ed org (37%) 5. Student achievement (35%) 6. Conference demo (30%) 7. Created by content experts (28%)
  • 27. © Project Tomorrow 2011 How do parents determine quality for digital resources they bring into their home? Quality Factors Parents 1. My child finds the tools engaging 64% 2. Aligned to my child’s curriculum 62% 3. My child’s teacher is using the same tools in the classroom 53% 4. Recommended by my child’s teacher, school librarian or other educator 48% 5. My child is doing better in school after using similar tools 48% 6. Aligned to content standards (state or national) 41% 7. Our school purchased a license for the tools and allows home access 38% 8. Developed by an organization with expertise in the field 38% 9. Student achievement results 36% 10. Developed by a classroom teacher 35%
  • 28. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What if …. We asked students to design the ultimate digital or e-textbook? What features and functionality would they desire?
  • 29. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Three themes emerge from the data:  Students want interactivity and relevancy  They want tools to facilitate collaboration  They want ways to personalize learning Students’ desires for the features and functionality of digital or e-textbooks
  • 30. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Three themes emerge from the data:  Students want interactivity and relevancy  They want tools to facilitate collaboration  They want ways to personalize learning Students’ desires for the features and functionality of digital or e-textbooks E-textbook as proxy for the student vision for a new learning paradigm
  • 31. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning
  • 32. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Students Design the Ultimate E-Textbook Leveraging Social-Based Learning in the Ultimate E-Textbook 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Collaboration tools Online tutors Chat rooms with video Communications tools Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Gr 3-5
  • 33. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Students Design the Ultimate E-Textbook Leveraging Un-tethered Learning in the Ultimate E-Textbook 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Online classes Self-assessments Mobile apps Downloadable to phone Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Gr 3-5
  • 34. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Students Design the Ultimate E-Textbook 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Animations/simulations Games Virtual labs 3D content Video clips Real time data Gr 9-12 Gr 6-8 Gr 3-5 Leveraging Digitally-Rich Content in the Ultimate E-Textbook
  • 35. © Project Tomorrow 2011 The Future of Learning with Digital Content What do the students say? What do the educators say?
  • 36. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Our Expert Panel Students: Nathan Kosmin Springfield PA Lauren McCuen Springfield PA Kiera Ochsner Phoenix AZ Educators: Joquetta Johnson Baltimore MD Jared Mader Red Lion PA John Quinn Baltimore MD Ben Smith Red Lion PA Catherine Wyman Phoenix AZ
  • 37. © Project Tomorrow 2011 What is the bottom line? Today’s students want learning that is: Enabled Engaging Empowered
  • 38. © Project Tomorrow 2011 • National Speak Up Findings and reports • Additional data analysis from Speak Up 2010 • Presentations, podcasts and webinars • Evaluation services • Reports and white papers • Participate in Speak Up 2011! More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
  • 39. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Speak Up 2011 New online surveys for students, parents & educators open for input: October 10 - December 23 Enable, engage, empower your stakeholder voices!
  • 40. © Project Tomorrow 2011 Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Copyright Project Tomorrow 2011. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.