Education 20/20 ~ Perspectives on Education Change
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Education 20/20 ~ Perspectives on Education Change

on

  • 1,967 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,967
Views on SlideShare
1,947
Embed Views
20

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
90
Comments
0

3 Embeds 20

http://www.tomorrow.org 14
http://www.slideshare.net 5
http://tomorrow.org 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Education 20/20 ~ Perspectives on Education Change Education 20/20 ~ Perspectives on Education Change Presentation Transcript

  • MARYLAND’S FOURTH ANNUAL TEACHERS OF PROMISE INSTITUTE Education 20/20 ~ Perspectives on Education Change © Project Tomorrow 2010 Emerging Technologies in Education Speak Up 2009 Results Julie Evans Project Tomorrow April 23, 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our discussion today
    • Learn: from key stakeholders about emerging technologies and education
    • Reflect: on your future practice
    • Create: new insights, conversations & networks
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our discussion today
    • Learn: from key stakeholders about emerging technologies and education
    • Reflect: on your future practice
    • Create: new insights, conversations & networks
    Quick-Thinks Table-Talks Speak Up Research Project: Views of Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators & Pre-Service Teachers
    • Annual national research project
      • Online surveys + focus groups
      • Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education
      • Schools/districts/colleges get back their own data for planning and budgeting
    • Collect data ↔ Stimulate conversations
      • K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents and Administrators + Pre-Service Teachers
    • Inform policies & programs
      • Analysis and reporting – national reports, state reports, district reports
      • Services: custom reports, consulting with districts and state agencies
      • NCES back end database – provide statistically significant samplings
    • 7 years of empowering authentic voices – since 2003:
      • 1.6 million K-12 students
      • 142,000 teachers
      • 82,000 parents
      • 10,500 school leaders
      • 23,000 schools – from all 50 states, DC, American military base schools, Canada, Mexico, Australia
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What is Speak Up? 1.85 million respondents
    • Speak Up is facilitated annually
    • by Project Tomorrow
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org) is the leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education.
  • Saluting our Speak Up 2009 Sponsors: © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Thanks for the use of the classroom tools today! © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Warm Up Quick-Think © Project Tomorrow 2010 Imagine you are going to spend a month on a deserted island. What is the one “ mobile technology” you would need to have with you? Yes, solar power re-charging stations will be available on your island.
  • Warm Up Quick-Think © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Smart phone
    • Handheld video game player
    • Laptop
    • Digital reader
    • MP3 player
    • Cordless hair curling or flat iron
      • Learning & Teaching with Technology
      • 21 st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship
      • Science/Math Instruction
      • Career Interests in STEM Fields and Teaching
      • Teacher Preparation Programs
      • Teacher Professional Development
      • Internet Safety
      • Emerging Technologies in the Classroom
        • Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content and E-textbooks
        • Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications
      • Designing the Ultimate School
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Speak Up survey question themes
    • Collect unique data from stakeholders
    • Give stakeholders a voice in national/state/provincial policy
    • Support specific initiatives such as digital content, online learning, mobile devices, 1:1 programs or new teacher professional development programs
    • Model for students the value of civic engagement and being part of a national discussion
    • Recognition as an innovation leader
    • Demonstrate to students, teachers and parents that their ideas are valued by their education leaders
    • Creating a new vision for the future of K-12 education
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Why do schools & districts participate in Speak Up?
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 A student vision . . . . “ I believe that the purpose of education is not to make men carpenters, but to make carpenters men. To be competitive in a workplace that is changing and will change continuously throughout our careers, my peers and I need to be able to read and understand new information at a level never before prevalent. This should be, however, a familiar aim for the forces of academia, however, since what we must learn, in essence, is to learn. I would ensure a broad and balanced education that exposes every student to rigorous inquiry in every discipline, from physics to pottery and makes them active participants in the process of inquiry and learning.” (11 th grader, Pittsburgh PA)
    • K-12 Students 299,677
    • Teachers 38,642
    • Pre-Service Teachers 1,987
    • Parents (in English & Spanish) 26,312
    • School/District Administrators 3,947
    • Schools / Districts 5757 / 1215
    • Top Participating States (# of participants)
      • Top 12: TX, AZ, AL, CA, FL, MD, PA, NC, AR, MO, NY, IL
      • About Speak Up Schools:
          • 97% public, 3% private
          • 38% urban, 31% suburban, 32% rural
          • 54% Title 1 eligible – indication of community poverty
          • 42% majority-minority student population
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 National Speak Up 2009 Participation: 370,565
    • Speak Up 2009 participation:
    • K-12 Students 12,961
    • Teachers 2,136
    • Parents 507
    • School/District Administrators 163
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Maryland “Speaks Up” about Education and Technology
  • Top Ten Recommendations from Students and Parents on Leveraging Emerging Technologies to Improve American Education Release of the Speak Up 2009 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents © Project Tomorrow 2010 SU 2009 Congressional Briefing Washington DC March 16, 2010
  • Save the Date: National Release of the 2009 Speak Up Data Findings from K-12 Teachers, Administrators and Pre-Service Teachers ( new this year!) Wednesday, May 5, 2010 12 noon – 1:30 pm Rayburn House Office Building - Room B339 © Project Tomorrow 2010 Presentation of Findings National Speakers Panel of Educators Discussion & Lunch RSVP: [email_address] 949-609-4660 x12
  • Key 2009 Finding: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision
      • Social–based learning
      • Un–tethered learning
      • Digitally–rich learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Social–based learning
        • Students want to leverage emerging communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Un–tethered learning
        • Students envision technology-enabled learning that transcends classroom walls
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Digitally–rich learning
        • Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key to education productivity
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Speak Up 2009 Data Findings
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Students “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our “Aspiring Teacher” Profile
    • 69% in undergrad programs; 31% in grad programs
    • 2/3rds say they are “extremely interested” in a teaching career
    • 59% want to teach pre-school/elementary students
    • 15% see themselves teaching math to secondary students
    • 45% would be motivated to accept an assignment in a challenged community if loans would be forgiven
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our “Aspiring Teacher” Profile
    • 74% consider their tech skills to be average – compared to their peers
    • 30% have a smart phone; 83% have an MP3/iPod
    • 83% regularly update their Facebook/MySpace page
    • 1/3 have provided online support to a peer
    • 1 out of 4 regularly contribute to a blog
    • Majority have taken an online class for school
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think Besides classroom management and discipline, what will be the most significant challenge you will face as a teacher?
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think Besides classroom management and discipline, what will be the most significant challenges you will face as a teacher?
    • Communications with parents
    • Developing students’ 21st century skills
    • Teaching at risk youth
    • Using technology within instruction
    • Getting supplies for my classroom
    • Helping students do well on standardized tests
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Use of technology in teacher prep programs Communications Writing assignments Research Accessing digital content Creating presentations Online class/tests/grades ≥ 50%
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Use of technology in teacher prep programs Communications Writing assignments Research Accessing digital content Creating presentations Online class/tests/grades ≥ 50% Online communities Blogs/wikis Learning mgment systems Virtual discussions Online tutors Virtual reality ≤ 38%
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Best way to learn about technology use in education Top responses: Field experiences 82% Classroom observations 76% Observing professors’ use 68% From classmates 66% Working with exemplary teachers 63%
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What tech tools are you learning to use in your methods class? Top vote getters: Using productivity tools 53% Creating presentations 44% Creating e-portfolios 31% Creating videos, podcasts and websites 28% Gradebooks / Sharing student work 25%
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What tech tools are you learning to use in your methods class? Top vote getters: Using productivity tools 53% Creating presentations 44% Creating e-portfolios 31% Creating videos, podcasts and websites 28% Gradebooks / Sharing student work 25% Analyzing student achievement data – only 5%
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What technology experiences would best prepare you?
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What technologies would you like to use in your classroom to enhance student achievement?
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Table-Talk “ As you think about your career, how will you define your success as a teacher?”
  • Speak Up 2009 Data Findings
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Students “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our Teacher Profile
    • 81% classroom teachers
    • 83% female
    • 40% teach elementary; 49% secondary
    • Years of teaching experience:
        • 1 to 3 years: 13%
        • 4 to 10 years: 32%
        • 11 to 15 years: 19%
        • 16+ years: 36%
    • 38% have a Masters degree in education
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our Teacher Profile
    • 58% view their tech skills as average – compared to their peers (1/3 consider themselves advanced)
    • 29% have a smart phone; 2 out of 3 have an iPod
    • Almost half regularly update their Facebook/MySpace page – up from 15% in 2008
    • 22% have created a class website
    • 1/3 have participated in a 100% online PD class; 22% have taken a blended online PD course
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What technology are you using in your classroom to enhance student achievement? Accessing the Internet Communications tools Computer projection Digital media tools ≥ 63 %
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What technology are you using in your classroom to enhance student achievement? Accessing the Internet Communications tools Computer projection Digital media tools Games (42%) Document camera (38%) Interactive whiteboards (36%) Collaboration tools (27%) Online textbooks (19%) Mobile devices (10%) E-portfolios (10%) Virtual simulations (5%) ≥ 63 % ≤ 42%
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 How do you use technology to facilitate learning?
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think Besides lack of time, what are the major obstacles you face using technology in your school?
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think Besides time, what are the major obstacles you face using technology in your school?
    • Lack of computers
    • District policies about tech use
    • Internet is too slow
    • School filters and firewalls block websites I need
    • Technology support
    • I don’t know how to use the technology
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think Besides time, what are the major obstacles you face using technology in your school? Maryland Teachers say:
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 How would you like your district to use technology to create professional learning communities?
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What kinds of digital resources are you using in “your classroom?”
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 What is the best way to evaluate the quality of digital resources? Top responses: Teacher evaluation of the materials 46% Materials are created by practicing teachers 42% Referred by a colleague 40% Student achievement with the materials 33%
    • Maryland Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 How has the use of technology improved your effectiveness as a teacher? Top responses: Better organized 44% More productive 41% Facilitating student centered learning 31% Creating more interactive lessons 31% Have time to differentiate instruction 29% Creating more relevant lessons 28%
    • Maryland Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 How has your use of technology within instruction impacted your students? Top responses: More motivated to learn 44% Developing creativity 30% More participation in discussions 26% Applying knowledge to practical problems 24% Developing problem-solving/critical thinking skills 20% Working together more often 20%
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Table-Talk “ How will you use student achievement data and formative assessments to personalize learning?
  • Speak Up 2009 Data Findings
    • Pre-service teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Teachers “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    • Students “Speak Up”
        • Quick-Think and Table-Talk
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our Maryland Student Profile
    • 65% of students in grades 6-12 say their tech skills are average, compared to their peers
    • Most popular uses of technology for schoolwork: research, writing assignments, accessing class information, communications and creating presentations and videos
    • Additionally, 35% of high school students say they use their social networking site to collaborate with classmates on school projects
    • 44% of students grades 6-8 saying they would learn more if content was in a game format
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Our Maryland Student Profile
    • Maryland students have a lot of personal devices that they would like to use in school
    Personal device K-2 Gr 3-5 Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 Laptop 27% 28% 47% 44% Cell phone 19% 31% 54% 56% Smart phone 7% 21% 28% 32% MP 3 40% 46% 71% 73%
  • Sampling of Key Findings: Speak Up 2003 - 2009
    • Persistent digital disconnect between students and educators/parents
    • Students’ frustrations with the lack of meaningful technology use in school
    • Spectrum of digital native-ness
    • Students are a “Digital Advance Team” for us
    • Rapid adoption and adaption of emerging technologies
    • Introducing the “Free Agent Learner”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Introducing the “Digital Advance Team” Today’s K-12 Students Adopting/adapting technologies for learning Tech trend setters Their use predicts widespread acceptance Out of school use drives in school use Pace car for others Teachers ultimately catch up
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Social–based learning
        • Students want to leverage emerging communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students’ use of collaboration and communications tools for school work
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Un–tethered learning
        • Students envision technology-enabled learning that transcends classroom walls
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students’ suggested use of mobile devices for learning purposes
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students believe that mobile devices can also enhance personal productivity
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Parents’ beliefs about the potential benefits of using mobile devices for instructional purposes
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Increases student engagement 43% Prepares students for world of work 41% Extends school day for learning 38% Provides access to online textbooks 37% Improves teacher-parent-student communications 35%
    • Teachers’ beliefs about the potential benefits of using mobile devices for instructional purposes
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Increases student engagement 50% Prepares students for world of work 40% Extends school day for learning 36% Improves teacher-parent-student communications 36% Personalizes instruction 29%
    • Teachers’ biggest concern about using mobile devices at school
    • While 50% of teachers say that the greatest benefit to using mobile devices:
            • increases student engagement in school and learning
            • 67% say their biggest concern however
            • is students will be distracted doing other things (texting, surfing, games)
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Parents’ willingness to purchase mobile devices for their child to use at school
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements
      • Digitally–rich learning
        • Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key to education productivity
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • What if you could design a new online textbook. What features and functionality would be important to you?
      • Three themes:
          • Interactive and relevant
          • Facilitate collaboration
          • Personalize learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students want their online textbooks to be interactive and relevant
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students want their online textbooks to have tools that facilitate collaboration
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Students want to use their digital textbooks to personalize learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning
    • Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision
      • Social–based learning
      • Un–tethered learning
      • Digitally–rich learning
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Think How would you like to learn math?
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Quick-Take How do you want to learn math?
    • Doing textbook problems
    • Helping other students learn math
    • Solving real world problems
    • Playing online or computer games
    • Discussing problems with classmates
    • Learning from a teacher who is excited about math
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
    Career Interests
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
    Career Interests
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Imagine you are designing the ultimate school for 21st century learners. Which of these technology tools or strategies do you think holds the greatest potential for increasing student achievement and success?
    • Maryland Students “Speak Up”
  • Top responses in 2009: Maryland students Students design the ultimate school for 21st century learning
    • Digital media tools
    • Communications tools
    • Collaboration tools
    • Games
    • Digital resources
    • Online classes
    • Online textbooks
    • E-portfolios
    • Laptops for each student
    • Mobile devices
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Social based learning Un-tethered learning Digitally rich learning
    • Continuing “digital disconnects”
    • Spectrum of digital native-ness
    • Multiple “computers” in the backpack
    • Embracing & adapting new technologies
    • Anytime, anyplace, anywhere, any pace learning
    Other trends we are watching © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • Self directed learning for student & teacher
    • Everyone is a content developer
    • Make it relevant to me!
    • Blend of informal & formal learning opps
    • Beyond engagement to productivity benefits
    • “ Long tail” of training & education
    Other trends we are watching © Project Tomorrow 2010
  • Maryland Students Want to Have a Voice, too
    • How would you like to be more involved in education
    • decisions at your school?
    © Project Tomorrow 2010
    • 86% would like to be more involved
    • Have class discussions
    • Give input through Speak Up and other surveys
    • Share ideas online with other students
    • Be part of a club that researches problems & presents ideas
    • Be part of a student advisory group for the principal
    • Set up a blog and wiki to share ideas
    • Make presentations to the school board
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Introducing the “Digital Advance Team” Today’s K-12 Students Adopting/adapting technologies for learning Tech trend setters Their use predicts widespread acceptance Out of school use drives in school use Pace car for others Teachers ultimately catch up
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Recommendations from the “ Digital Advance Team”
    • Are we listening? Are we ready?
    • Learning that is
    • Enabled
    • Engaging
    • Empowered
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 Recommendations from the “ Digital Advance Team”
    • Are we listening? Are we ready?
    • Learning that is
    • Enabled
    • Engaging
    • Empowered
    How do we get there?
    • Students “Speak Up”
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 Table Talk Time “ What makes a great teacher a great teacher?”
    • National Speak Up Findings
    • Additional data analysis from Speak Up 2009
    • Presentations, podcasts and webinars
    • Reports and white papers
    • Information about other services
    • Information about Speak Up 2010
    © Project Tomorrow 2010 More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
  • Save the Date: National Release of the 2009 Speak Up Data Findings from K-12 Teachers, Administrators and Pre-Service Teachers ( new this year!) Wednesday, May 5, 2010 12 noon – 1:30 pm Rayburn House Office Building - Room B339 © Project Tomorrow 2010 Presentation of Findings National Speakers Panel of Educators Discussion & Lunch RSVP: [email_address] 949-609-4660 x12
  • © Project Tomorrow 2010 More data and reports are available on our website: www.tomorrow.org Julie Evans Project Tomorrow [email_address] 949-609-4660 x15 Copyright Project Tomorrow 2010. This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. Thank you!