Changing the Classroom Paradigm: Let’s Go Mobile!
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Changing the Classroom Paradigm: Let’s Go Mobile! Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Changing the Classroom Paradigm: Let’s Go Mobile!FETC 2012: Julie Evans, Project Tomorrow CEO © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 2. Big Questions for Discussion: What is the student vision for mobile learning? How is that vision being supported by educators and parents? What is their unique value proposition for mobile learning? What can we learn from pilots about the impact of mobile learning specifically on teacher practice? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 3. Big Questions for Discussion: What is the student vision for mobile learning? How is that vision being supported by educators and parents? What is their unique value proposition for mobile learning? What can we learn from pilots about the impact of mobile learning specifically on teacher practice? How can you leverage the new energy around mobile learning to change teaching and learning in your school or district? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 4. Discussion Agenda: Brief intro to the Speak Up Project Selected Speak Up Data on Mobile Learning Insights from Mobile Learning Projects Panel of Experts Discussion Audience Q&A © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 5. Meet our Expert Panel: Randall Palmer Computer Specialist The Children’s Institute Tom Plati Director, Education Technology & Assessment Lexington Public Schools Betsy Pruitt eLearning Coach Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corporation © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 6. Context: © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 7. Speak Up National Research ProjectAnnual national research project Online surveys + focus groups Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education Institutions receive free report with their own dataCollect ideas ↔ Stimulate conversations K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators Pre-Service Teachers in Schools of EducationInform policies & programs Analysis and reporting of findings and trends Consulting services to help transform teaching and learning + 2.6 million surveys since 2003 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 8. Speak Up survey question themes Learning & Teaching with Technology 21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship Science and Math Instruction Career Interests in STEM and Teaching Professional Development / Teacher Preparation Internet Safety Administrators’ Challenges Emerging Technologies in the Classroom Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content, E- textbooks Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications Designing the 21st Century School © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 9. What can the Speak Upfindings tell us about the future of learning? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 10. Speak Up National Research ProjectKey Findings: Speak Up 2003 – 2011 Students function as a “Digital Advance Team” Students regularly adopt and adapt emerging technologies for learning Students’ frustrations focus on the unsophisticated use of technologies within education Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults Exacerbation of lack of relevancy in current education © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 11. Emerging from the Speak Up research: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 12. Emerging from the Speak Up research: A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity This student vision for “technology enabled learning” mirrors how students want to learn in general © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 13. The Student Vision for Learning Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 14. The Student Vision for Learning Social–based learning Mobile Un–tethered learning Learning Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 15. Voices of K-12 Students, Parents & EducatorsSpeak Up 2011 Activities, Attitudes & Aspirations Disconnects & Differences Trends & Leverage Points © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 16. Students and their devices Personal Access to Mobile Devices Device K-2 Gr 3-5 Gr 6-8 Gr 9-12 Cell phone (without internet 18% 25% 48% 49% access) Smart phone 17% 21% 37% 50% Digital reader 8% 9% 17% 13% MP3 33% 52% 77% 82% Tablet device 17% 18% 26% 21% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 17. Students and mobile learningHow would you use a mobile device to help youwith schoolwork? A. Increase effectiveness of school: Check grades 81% Take notes for class 67% Access online textbooks 62% Write papers and do homework 56% Use the calendar 50% Learn about school activities 47% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 18. Students and mobile learningHow would you use a mobile device to help youwith schoolwork? B. Leverage capabilities to increase personalization of learning process: Anytime, anywhere research 72% Receive reminders & alerts 61% Collaborate with peers & teachers 55% Organize schoolwork assignments 53% Access school network from home 51% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 19. Are parents, teachers & administrators alsomobile-enabled? Personal Access to Mobile Devices District Device Parents Teachers Principals Admin Cell phone (without internet 47% 49% 34% 31% access) Smart phone 67% 54% 64% 70% Digital reader 29% 24% 18% 23% MP3 76% 66% 47% 56% Tablet device 36% 26% 47% 55% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 20. Value proposition for administrators and teachersWhat are the benefits of mobile learning? Teachers Teachers Administrators Administrators 2007 2011 2007 2011 Improves teacher-parent- 35% 55% 31% 36% student communications Increases student 51% 79% 66% 80% engagement in learning Provides way to personalize 30% 61% 30% 58% instruction Develops collaboration and 21% 40% 26% 34% teamwork skills Develops problem solving 26% 50% 34% 41% skills Extends learning beyond 45% 58% 47% 58% school day © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 21. The principals respondHow likely are you this year to allow students to use their own mobile devices for instructional purposes at school? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 22. The principals respondHow likely are you this year to allow students to use their own mobile devices for instructional purposes at school? Will you allow students to use their own mobile devices? 11% 22% 65% Likely Unlikely Unsure © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 23. The principals respond What is holding you back? Top challenges: • Concerns about theft of devices • Concerns about network security • Digital equity issues • Teachers are not trained • Devices could be a distraction © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 24. Mobile learning visionsParents offer a solution to the digital equity challengeIf your child’s school allowed for the use of mobiledevices for educational purposes, how likely is itthat you would purchase one for your child? © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 25. Parents offer a solution to the digital equity challengeIf your child’s school allowed for the use of mobile devicesfor educational purposes, how likely is it that you wouldpurchase one for your child? Parents: Willingness to Purchase a Mobile Device for Child 13% 8% Likely Unlikely Unsure 15% School responsibility 62% © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 26. Teachers’ concerns about mobile learningWhat are your biggest concerns?• Distraction potential 76%• Digital equity 66%• Students could cheat with the devices 34%• How to teach digital responsibility 33%• I don’t know how to integrate into 27% instruction © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 27. Teachers’ Point of View: Impact of technologyHow has technology enhanced your students’academic success? 1. More motivated to learn 2. Developing their creativity 3. Developing critical thinking and problem solving skills 4. Applying knowledge to practical problems 5. More participation in discussions and group activities © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 28. Teachers’ Point of View: Impact of technologyHow has technology improved youreffectiveness as a teacher? 1. I am creating more interactive and relevant lessons 2. I am better organized 3. I am facilitating student centered learning 4. I am more productive 5. I am encouraging more student self-directed learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 29. Research Findings © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 30. Project K-Nect Research ResultsSpring 2010 – Key Findings:• Changes the way teachers’ teach math• Students take greater responsibility for their own learning• Students feel more successful with math• Demonstrated higher levels of math proficiency © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 31. Project K-Nect Research ResultsSpring 2010 – Key Findings: “The smart phone is like a teacher in my pocket.” Project K-Nect Student “I can’t go back to the way I taught before Project K-Nect.” Project K-Nect Teacher © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 32. Project K-Nect Research ResultsFall 2010 – Key Findings:• Increased student motivation and confidence in learning math• Increased student interest in college and math related degrees and careers• Closes digital access gap resulting in increased technology proficiency © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 33. Project K-Nect Research Results F ig u re 1: A lg e b ra I stu d e n ts re p o rt in cre a se d co n fid e n c e in th e ir m a th a b ilitie s Mo tiva te d to le a rn m a th 89% 76% C o m fo rta b le le a rn in g m a th 83% 71% Fe e l s u c c e s s fu l 72% 59% Ma th is e a s y 61% 29% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Be g inn in g o f s e m e s te r En d o f s e m e s te r © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 34. Project K-Nect Research ResultsSpring 2011 – Key Findings:• Development of 21st century skills – Problem solving skills • 80% increase from pre to post surveys in student self-assessment – Collaboration and teamwork skills • 2X more students comfortable working with other students – Communications skills around math • Increased comfort and competency – Understanding of tools to use to further learning • Seeking other online tools to support self-directed learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 35. Project K-Nect Research ResultsSpring 2011 – Key Findings: Exit Cohort• Reported by the students: – Greater responsibility and ownership for supporting each other – Development of leadership skills – A supportive environment for learning that enabled active participation – Developed confidence in abilities to be successful – Learned different strategies for problem solving – Gained appreciation for different perspectives © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 36. Project K-Nect Research Results Big lessons learned (so far!): High value in creating a supportive learning environment Skills students learned go far beyond math Transforms the teaching process and builds teacher capacity for innovation Enables a shift in thinking about “tools” – Students: personalizing learning and networks – Teachers: value of instant assessment and increased productivity © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 37. Meet our Expert Panel: Randall Palmer Computer Specialist The Children’s Institute Tom Plati Director, Education Technology & Assessment Lexington Public Schools Betsy Pruitt eLearning Coach Evansville-Vanderburgh School Corporation © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 38. What is the bottom line? Today’s studentswant learning that is: Enabled Engaging Empowered © Project Tomorrow 2010 © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 39. The Student Vision for Learning Social–based learning Mobile Un–tethered learning Learning Digitally–rich learning © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 40. More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org• National Speak Up Findings and reports• Speak Up 2011 data: release to participating districts on Feb 1• Speak Up 2011 data: national release in April• Presentations, podcasts and webinars• Evaluation services & reports• Speak Up 2012! © Project Tomorrow 2011
  • 41. Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT Copyright Project Tomorrow 2011.This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is grantedfor this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. © Project Tomorrow 2011