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Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings
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Speak Up Congressional Briefing 2013 Parent and Educators Findings

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  • 1. Speak Up 2013 National Findings: Educators and Parents Welcome to this year’s Briefing! Washington DC – June 2, 2014
  • 2. Welcome Julie Evans Chief Executive Officer ProjectTomorrow (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 3. Welcome  Julie Evans, Project Tomorrow  Dr. Joseph South, US Department of Education Release of National Findings:  Role of digital tools in supporting the development of college and career ready skills Discussion with our Panel of Experts Your Questions,Thoughts and Comments Closing comments  Mark Belles, Blackboard, Inc. Today’s Agenda (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 4. Thank you! Rep. George Miller 11th District - California (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 5. © 2014 Project Tomorrow Saluting our Speak Up 2013 Sponsors:
  • 6. © 2014 Project Tomorrow Many thanks to our K-12 National Champion Outreach Partners:
  • 7. Welcoming Remarks Dr. Joseph South Deputy Director Office of EducationalTechnology U.S. Department of Education (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 8. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 What is Speak Up? Key report highlights Panel Discussion
  • 9. Annual national research project  Using online surveys + focus groups  Surveys for: K-12 Students,Teachers, Parents, Administrators, Community Members  Special: Pre-ServiceTeachers in Schools of Education  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Schools, districts & colleges receive free report with their own data Inform policies, plans & programs  Local: your stakeholder data  State: state level data  Federal: national findings Speak Up National Research Project + 3.4 million surveys since 2003 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 10. K-12 Students 325,279 Teachers & Librarians 32,151 Parents (in English & Spanish) 39,986 School/District Administrators 4,530 Community Members (new this year!) 1,346 About the participating schools & districts o 9,005 schools and 2,710 districts o 90% public schools – 10% private/parochial/charter/other o 32% urban / 31% rural / 37% suburban o 30% school wide Title 1; 43% majority minority school o All 50 states + DC + Guam + DODEA schools National Speak Up 2013 Participation: 403,292 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 11. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 First report: focus on students’ views Released April 9, 2014
  • 12. Why do schools and districts participate in Speak Up? .  Power of local data  Use data as input for planning  To justify budget and purchasing decisions  Inform new initiatives – as an evaluation tool  As a tool to engage parents  Use for grant writing and fund development  Content for professional development  To counteract mythology  To explore how to address critical needs (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 13. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Critical Need: Preparing these students for the future
  • 14. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 100 7th grade students 93 say they want to go college 70 will graduate from HS Today’s reality
  • 15. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 100 7th grade students 93 say they want to go college 70 will graduate from HS 44 will enroll in college Today’s reality
  • 16. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 100 7th grade students 93 say they want to go college 70 will graduate from HS 44 will enroll in college Only 26 will graduate from college Today’s reality
  • 17. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Are our students set-up for success?
  • 18. Meet our panel of experts (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Dr. Katherine Bihr o Vice President and Executive Director, TigerWoods Learning Center Foundation TamikaV. Culbreath o Reading/English Language ArtsTeacher, Prince Georges County Public Schools Monet Deadwyler o Junior, Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy at Capitol Hill Breck DeWitt o CTO and National Director K12 and Higher Education, EMC Corporation Dr. Patrick Murphy o Superintendent, Arlington Public Schools
  • 19. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Today’s big questions  What do we mean by college and career readiness skills?  What is the relationship between the use of digital tools and the development of these skills in the classroom?  How are schools, districts and communities building up their capacity to prepare students for the future?
  • 20. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Defining the skills students need for future success
  • 21. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 CollegeandWorkplaceSkills District Administrators Teachers Parents Community Members Criticalthinkingandproblemsolvingskills 91% 75% 85% 88% Abilitytoworkwithadiversesetofpeople 86% 69% 71% 82% Teamworkandcollaborationskills 83% 66% 69% 79% Abilitytolearnindependently 82% 77% 67% 79% Technologyskills 80% 52% 69% 80% Effectivecommunicationsthroughwriting 76% 55% 68% Beingcreativeandthinkingoutsidethebox 75% 62% 72% 77% Financialliteracy 79% Defining college and career ready skills: ranking of importance for students
  • 22. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 CollegeandWorkplaceSkills District Administrators Teachers Parents Community Members Criticalthinkingandproblemsolvingskills 91% 75% 85% 88% Abilitytoworkwithadiversesetofpeople 86% 69% 71% 82% Teamworkandcollaborationskills 83% 66% 69% 79% Abilitytolearnindependently 82% 77% 67% 79% Technologyskills 80% 52% 69% 80% Effectivecommunicationsthroughwriting 76% 55% 68% Beingcreativeandthinkingoutsidethebox 75% 62% 72% 77% Financialliteracy 79% Defining college and career ready skills: ranking of importance for students Technology skills Linkage to student success?
  • 23. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 42% 59% 42% 41% 56% 36% 56% 57% Parents of high school students High School Teachers High School Principals District Administrators Not important Important Extremely important How important is the effective implementation of technology within instruction on student success?
  • 24. Let’s hear from our experts (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Dr. Katherine Bihr o Vice President and Executive Director, TigerWoods Learning Center Foundation TamikaV. Culbreath o Reading/English Language ArtsTeacher, Prince Georges County Public Schools Monet Deadwyler o Junior, Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy at Capitol Hill Breck DeWitt o CTO and National Director K12 and Higher Education, EMC Corporation Dr. Patrick Murphy o Superintendent, Arlington Public Schools
  • 25. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Classroom use of digital tools and linkages to college/career prep
  • 26. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Teachers’ use of digital tools for professional tasks Teachers who self assess their skills as “advanced” compared to peers:  Internet research to info a lesson (90%)  Watch an online video to learn something (74%)  Text with colleagues (67%)  Customize digital content for class use (56%)  Participate in online PLC (55%)
  • 27. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 14% 32% 32% 42% 52% 63% 11% 27% 18% 9% 22% 48% Videos that I create Online textbooks Real time data Virtual labs Animations Videos that I find online All teachers Gr 6-12 Science teachers Teachers’ use of digital content in the classroom
  • 28. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Teachers’ use of digital content in the classroom “Use of digital content helps students develop critical thinking and problem solving skills” 2009: 27% of classroom teachers 2013: 38% of classroom teachers
  • 29. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Perceived benefits of technology use for students Teaching in an online class Teaching using digital content Teaching in a 1:1 mobile class Developing creativity 50% 44% 49% Developing problem solving and critical thinking skills 57% 44% 45% Taking ownership of their learning 57% 35% 37% Learning to work collaboratively 30% 34% 37% Understanding how to apply academic concepts to real world problems 58% 37% 42% Increased motivation to learn 50% 60% 55% How has use of technology in your classroom enhanced student skills and success?
  • 30. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Professional Development Wish List 1st year 1-3 4-10 11-15 16+ How to differentiate instruction using technology 51% 48% 44% 44% 46% Identifying digital content 39% 33% 33% 34% 35% Identifying mobile apps 39% 37% 36% 36% 35% Using games 37% 29% 26% 24% 26% Using tablets 32% 31% 31% 30% 31% Implementing a blended classroom 27% 24% 23% 23% 22% Teachers’ wish list for professional development in technology use Years of experience
  • 31. Let’s hear from our experts (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Dr. Katherine Bihr o Vice President and Executive Director, TigerWoods Learning Center Foundation TamikaV. Culbreath o Reading/English Language ArtsTeacher, Prince Georges County Public Schools Monet Deadwyler o Junior, Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy at Capitol Hill Breck DeWitt o CTO and National Director K12 and Higher Education, EMC Corporation Dr. Patrick Murphy o Superintendent, Arlington Public Schools
  • 32. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Building school, district & community capacity for digital tool use and college/career prep
  • 33. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 District administrators’ views on solutions that have greatest potential to impact student readiness 1. Enhancing teacher effectiveness (58%) 2. Integrating 21st century skills into curriculum (49%) 3. Leveraging technology more effectively (46%)  Digital content  Blended learning  Tablets and other mobile devices  1:1 programs  Online textbooks  Flipped learning models  Online classes for students
  • 34. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Online learning in schools 41% of high schools offering online classes for students in:  Math  Science  History  English/Language Arts 1/3 of high schools offering classes in World Languages Only 17% report not offering any online classes
  • 35. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Why online learning? High School Principals Provide academic remediation 66% Keep students engaged in staying in school 63% Provide options for students that need credit recovery 61% Provide options for home-bound students 53% Provide options for at risk students 50% Provides students with options for advanced coursework 49% Provide options for gifted students 41% Provides students with dual enrollment options with local colleges 39% How online learning is supporting the needs of many types of students
  • 36. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Mobile learning in schools Principals say that mobile devices within instruction:  Increases engagement in learning (86%)  Personalizes learning (67%)  Extends learning beyond school day (62%)  Develops critical thinking and problem solving skills (51%)  Develops collaboration and teamwork skills (47%)
  • 37. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 22% 41% 63% 32% 13% 17% 3% 10% Principals in 2010 Principals in 2013 Likely Unlikely Unsure Already do Principals: How likely is it that you will allow students to use their own mobile devices at school?
  • 38. © 2014 Project Tomorrow Parent by Community / Age of Child(ren) I want my child in a BYOD class I would buy my child a device Parents from urban communities 64% 65% Parents from rural communities 64% 66% Parents from suburban communities 59% 64% Parents from Title 1 communities 63% 64% Parents of elementary students 58% 62% Parents of middle school students 63% 67% Parents of high school students 65% 67% Parents’ desires for mobile learning – in class with devices / willingness to buy devices
  • 39. (c) Project Tomorrow 2013 Digital content use in schools 54% of administrators say that use of digital content can increase students’ readiness – linking real world problem solving to academic content Two challenges however: • Enough computers and devices for students • Bandwidth capacity issues
  • 40. Let’s hear from our experts (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Dr. Katherine Bihr o Vice President and Executive Director, TigerWoods Learning Center Foundation TamikaV. Culbreath o Reading/English Language ArtsTeacher, Prince Georges County Public Schools Monet Deadwyler o Junior, Cesar Chavez Public Charter School for Public Policy at Capitol Hill Breck DeWitt o CTO and National Director K12 and Higher Education, EMC Corporation Dr. Patrick Murphy o Superintendent, Arlington Public Schools
  • 41. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 Creating a new digital learning playbook – focused on college and career readiness skill development
  • 42. Closing Remarks Mark Belles SeniorVice President, K12 Blackboard, Inc. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014
  • 43. © 2014 Project Tomorrow Saluting our Speak Up 2013 Sponsors:
  • 44. © 2014 Project Tomorrow Many thanks to our K-12 National Champion Outreach Partners:
  • 45. National Speak Up Findings and reports Targeted and thematic reports Online learning trends Mobile learning & social media Print to digital migration Social learning Intelligent adaptive software New digital parent series Presentations, podcasts and webinars Services: consulting, workshops, evaluation and efficacy studies Speak Up 2014 opens on October 6 (c) Project Tomorrow 2014 More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org
  • 46. Thank you. Let’s continue this conversation. Julie Evans Project Tomorrow jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT SpeakUpEd Copyright Project Tomorrow 2014 This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author. (c) Project Tomorrow 2014

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