2010 Congressional Briefing K12 Students Parents FINAL3

1,981
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,981
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2010 Congressional Briefing K12 Students Parents FINAL3

  1. 1. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />SU 2009 Congressional Briefing<br />Washington DC<br />March 16, 2010<br />Top Ten Recommendations from Students and Parents on Leveraging Emerging Technologies to Improve American EducationRelease of the Speak Up 2009 National Findings:K-12 Students & Parents<br />
  2. 2. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />“I believe that the purpose of education is not to make men carpenters, but to make carpenters men. To be competitive in a workplace that is changing and will change continuously throughout our careers, my peers and I need to be able to read and understand new information at a level never before prevalent. This should be, however, a familiar aim for the forces of academia, however, since what we must learn, in essence, is to learn.<br />I would ensure a broad and balanced education that exposes every student to rigorous inquiry in every discipline, from physics to pottery and makes them active participants in the process of inquiry and learning.”<br />(11th grader, Pittsburgh PA)<br />The reason we are here today<br />
  3. 3. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Today’s Agenda<br />Welcomes Julie Evans, Project Tomorrow<br /> Jessie Woolley-Wilson, Blackboard Inc. <br />Remarks Karen Cator, US Department of Education<br />Release of National Julie Evans<br />Findings <br />Panel Discussion Elementary, middle and high school<br />Q & A students from Maryland, Pennsylvania &<br /> Virginia <br />Closing Mick Adkisson, SMART Technologies<br />
  4. 4. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />What is Speak Up?<br />Annual national research project<br />Online surveys + focus groups<br />Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education<br />Schools/districts/colleges get back their own data for planning and budgeting<br />Collect data ↔ Stimulate conversations<br />K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents and Administrators + Pre-Service Teachers <br />Inform policies & programs<br />Analysis and reporting – national reports, state reports, district reports <br />Services: custom reports, consulting with districts and state agencies<br />NCES back end database – provide statistically significant samplings <br />7 years of empowering authentic voices – since 2003:<br />1.6 million K-12 students<br />142,000 teachers<br />82,000 parents<br />10,500 school leaders<br />23,000 schools – from all 50 states, DC, American military base schools, Canada, Mexico, Australia<br />1.85 million respondents<br />
  5. 5. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up is facilitated annually <br />by Project Tomorrow<br />(formerly known as NetDay)<br />Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org) <br />is the leading education nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment of student voices in education.<br />
  6. 6. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Saluting our Speak Up 2009 Sponsors:<br />
  7. 7. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />And the 75+ other national education and business associations & nonprofit groups that promote Speak Up to their stakeholders, members & affiliates.<br />Thank you to our 2009 National Champion Outreach Partners:<br />
  8. 8. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Jessie Woolley-Wilson<br />President, K-12 and K-20 Strategy<br />Blackboard Inc.<br />Welcome<br />
  9. 9. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Karen Cator<br />Director, <br />Office of Education Technology<br />US Department of Education<br />Remarks<br />
  10. 10. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />SU 2009 Congressional Briefing<br />Washington DC<br />March 16, 2010<br />Top Ten Recommendations from Students and Parents on Leveraging Emerging Technologies to Improve American Education<br />Release of the Speak Up 2009 <br />National Findings:<br />K-12 Students & Parents<br />
  11. 11. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />National Speak Up 2009 Participation: 370,565<br /><ul><li>K-12 Students 299,677
  12. 12. Teachers 38,642
  13. 13. Pre-Service Teachers 1,987
  14. 14. Parents (in English & Spanish) 26,312
  15. 15. School/District Administrators 3,947
  16. 16. Schools / Districts 5757 / 1215</li></ul>Top Participating States (# of participants) <br />Top 12: TX, AZ, AL, CA, FL, MD, PA, NC, AR, MO, NY, IL<br />About Speak Up Schools:<br />97% public, 3% private<br />38% urban, 31% suburban, 32% rural<br />54% Title 1 eligible – indication of community poverty<br />42% majority-minority student population<br />
  17. 17. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up 2009 Question Themes<br /><ul><li>Learning & Teaching with Technology
  18. 18. 21st Century Skills: Digital Citizenship
  19. 19. Math Instruction & Career Interests in STEM and Teaching
  20. 20. Professional Development
  21. 21. Internet Safety
  22. 22. Education Continuity – Administrators’ Challenges
  23. 23. Emerging Technologies in the Classroom
  24. 24. Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content / E-textbooks
  25. 25. Educational Games, Web 2.0 tools and applications
  26. 26. Designing the 21st Century School</li></li></ul><li>© Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Save the Date<br />
  27. 27. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up 2009 National Findings: K-12 Students & Parents<br />Let’s set some context<br />Learn about a new student vision <br />Discuss the recommendations of students and parents<br />
  28. 28. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Let’s set some context<br />Speak Up Question: <br />Imagine you are designing the <br />ultimate school. <br />Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact <br />on your learning?<br />
  29. 29. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up Question:<br />Imagine you are designing the ultimate school. Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact on your learning?<br />In what year were these the top three responses from students? <br />Fast, wireless Internet access throughout the school<br />Computer labs that stay open after school and on weekends<br />New computers throughout the school so students could go online whenever they want<br />
  30. 30. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up Question: Imagine you are designing the ultimate school. Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact on your learning?<br />A. 2009<br />B. 2007<br />C. 2005<br />D. 2003 <br />
  31. 31. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Speak Up Question: Imagine you are designing the ultimate school. Which technology tools and services would have the greatest positive impact on your learning?<br />A. 2009<br />B. 2007<br />C. 2005<br />D. 2003 <br />2003<br />
  32. 32. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Sampling of Key Findings: Speak Up 2003 - 2009<br />Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults<br />Students’ frustrations with the lack of technology use in school<br />Spectrum of digital native-ness<br />Students as a “Digital Advance Team”<br />Rapid adoption and adaption of emerging technologies <br />Introducing the “Free Agent Learner” <br />
  33. 33. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Top responses in 2009: Students design the ultimate school for 21st century learning<br />Communications tools (60%)<br />Digital media tools (60%)<br />Games and simulations (60%)<br />Online textbooks (57%)<br />Mobile computer for every student (57%)<br />Interactive whiteboards (53%)<br />Collaboration tools (51%)<br />Digital resources (51%)<br />Mobile devices (51%)<br />Tools to help organize schoolwork (49%)<br />Campus wide Internet access (49%)<br />Online classes (48%) <br />
  34. 34. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Putting the puzzle pieces together<br />Persistent digital disconnect<br />Frustration with school tech obstacles<br />Aspirations for 21st century learning<br />Millennial culture<br />Free Agent Learner activities <br />Perceived lack of relevancy in school<br />Use of emerging technologies<br />
  35. 35. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />A new uniquely “student vision” for leveraging emerging technologies to drive achievement and educational productivity<br />Result<br />
  36. 36. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision<br />Social–based learning<br />Un–tethered learning <br />Digitally–rich learning<br />
  37. 37. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Three Essential Elements<br />Social Based Learning <br />Students want to leverage emerging communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts<br />
  38. 38. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Three Essential Elements<br />Un–tethered learning <br />Students envision technology-enabled<br />learning that transcends classroom walls<br />
  39. 39. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Three Essential Elements<br />Digitally–rich learning<br />Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key <br />to education productivity<br />
  40. 40. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Social–based learning<br />Students want to leverage emerging<br />communications and collaboration tools to create personal networks of experts<br />
  41. 41. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social based learningStudents are “Free Agent” learners: Using technology tools on their own for learning<br />
  42. 42. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social based learningStudents’ use of technology for communication and collaboration outside of school. <br />
  43. 43. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social based learningStudents’ use of collaboration and communications tools for school work<br />51% <br />34% <br />21% <br />12%<br />What percentage of middle school students use their social networking site to collaborate with peers on schoolwork and projects?<br />
  44. 44. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social-based learningStudents use of collaboration and communications tools for school work<br />
  45. 45. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social-based learningExample within curriculum: Math and STEM Career Exploration<br />What would be most helpful for you in learning math? <br />“Discussing how to solve problems with my classmates”<br />“Helping other students with their math problems” <br />47% Grade 6-8 students<br />40% Grade 9-12 students<br />
  46. 46. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Social-based learningExample within curriculum: Math and STEM career exploration<br />How would you like to learn about STEM careers? <br />“Meeting successful role models”<br />“Talking to professionals about their jobs”<br />“Working with mentors”<br />
  47. 47. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Un–tethered learning <br />Students envision technology-enabled<br />learning that transcends classroom walls<br />
  48. 48. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learning Mobile Devices: Students have access to a variety of electronic devices<br />
  49. 49. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learningStudents’ suggested use of mobile devices for learningpurposes<br />
  50. 50. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learningStudents believe that mobile devices can also enhance personal productivity<br />
  51. 51. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learning<br />
  52. 52. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learning<br />Teachers’ biggest concerns about using mobile devices at school <br />50% of teachers say that the greatest benefit = increases student engagement in school and learning <br />67% of teachers say biggest concern= students will be distracted <br />
  53. 53. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learning<br />Parents’ willingness to purchase mobile devices for their child to use at school<br />A. 63%<br />B. 42%<br />C. 29%<br />D. 16%<br />What percentage of parents would be willing to purchase a mobile device for their child to use at school if the school allowed for their use within instruction? <br />
  54. 54. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learningParents willingness to purchase mobile devices for their child to use at school<br />
  55. 55. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learningStudents have a growing interest in taking online classes<br />
  56. 56. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Un-tethered learningStudents speak up about the value of online classes<br />
  57. 57. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Digitally–rich learning<br />Students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as key <br />to education productivity<br />
  58. 58. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningStudents’ use of digital resources for schoolwork<br />
  59. 59. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningStudents use of digital resources outside of school<br />Pre-schoolers<br />Elementary students K-2<br />Elementary students Gr 3-5<br />Middle school students Gr 6-8<br />High school students Gr 9-12<br />Which school age group are the most active in terms of<br />uploading and downloading digital media to the Internet?<br />
  60. 60. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningStudents use of digital resources outside of school<br />
  61. 61. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learning Students value the use of games for learning<br />
  62. 62. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningParents also perceive value in the use of games for learning<br />
  63. 63. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learning<br />Students’ desires for the features and functionality of online textbooks<br />Three themes:<br />Interactive and relevant<br />Facilitate collaboration<br />Personalize learning<br />
  64. 64. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learning Students want their online textbooks to be interactive and relevant<br />
  65. 65. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningStudents want their online textbooks to have tools to facilitate collaboration<br />
  66. 66. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Digitally-rich learningStudents want to use their digital textbooks to personal learning<br />
  67. 67. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Having a voice<br />How would you like to be more involved in education <br /> decisions at your school? <br />82% would like to be more involved<br /> Have class discussions<br /> Give input through Speak Up and other surveys<br /> Share ideas online with other students<br /> Be part of a club that researches problems & presents ideas<br /> Be part of a student advisory group for the principal <br /> Set up a blog and wiki to share ideas<br /> Make presentations to the school board<br />
  68. 68. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our Future:Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning<br />Three Essential Elements in the Student Vision<br />Social–based learning<br />Un–tethered learning <br />Digitally–rich learning<br />
  69. 69. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Creating Our FutureTop Ten Recommendations<br />Embrace social-based learning<br />Incorporate online collaboration tools<br />Experiment with using student mobile devices within instruction<br />Realize that it is not just about engagement – productivity wins!<br />Help parents with their Internet concerns <br />Provide students with information about online classes<br />Leverage digital resources to increase relevancy of content<br />Think creatively about the use of games in school<br />Understand that online textbooks are really about interaction<br />Engage students in local and national discussions <br />
  70. 70. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Sophia AmbergerJack Morgan<br />5th Grade Student 5th Grade Student<br />Brandi Moore Izzan Yussoff<br />7th Grade Student 8th Grade Student<br />Jill Luoma-OverstreetJames “J.J.” Wanda <br />10th Grade Student 10th Grade Student<br />Ceci GalloglyWasiq Shei <br />12th Grade Student 12th Grade Student<br />Meet our panel of experts<br />
  71. 71. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Mick Adkisson<br />Manager, Education Advocacy<br />SMART Technologies<br />Closing remarks<br />
  72. 72. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org<br />National Speak Up Findings<br />Additional data analysis from Speak Up 2009 <br />Presentations, podcasts and webinars<br />Reports and white papers <br />Information about other services <br />Information about Speak Up 2010 <br />
  73. 73. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Save the Date<br />
  74. 74. © Project Tomorrow 2010<br />Thank you for your participation in <br />today’s Congressional Briefing. <br />Julie Evans<br />Project Tomorrow<br />jevans@tomorrow.org<br />949-609-4660 x15<br />Copyright Project Tomorrow 2010. <br />This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×