Nyu Pte Methods For Math & Science Teachers Oct 8, 2009 1

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This module, part of the NYU Partnership for Teacher Excellence Curriculum Development Project, offers methods and strategies for math and science teachers to adapt their teaching to better serve ELL students in their classes.

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  • Hindu view of the human being: made up of a “house” consisting of mind, body, emotion and spirit
  • Peter Salovery, Yale; John Meyer New Haven Reuven Bar-On, Israeli Daniel Goleman Writer
  • Nyu Pte Methods For Math & Science Teachers Oct 8, 2009 1

    1. 1. <ul><li>METHODS FOR TEACHING MATH AND SCIENCE TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS </li></ul><ul><li>THE PARTNERSHIP FOR TEACHER EXCELLENCE </li></ul><ul><li>CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT </li></ul><ul><li>June 15, 2009 </li></ul>
    2. 2. <ul><li>There are many factors affecting ELLs’ success in Mathematics and Science. </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Social Language : </li></ul><ul><li>making requests, retelling events, describing activities, expressing personal opinions, sustaining conversation, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Language : </li></ul><ul><li>conceptually demanding and </li></ul><ul><li>cognitively complex </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Content vocabulary is the set of content words used in your content area. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Math: product, sum, carry, exchange, equal, percentage </li></ul><ul><li>Science: cell, electron, amphibian, virus, atmosphere, environment </li></ul>
    5. 5. A TRIANGLE
    6. 7. <ul><li>Math Teachers: See the Math Unit. p.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Science Teachers: See the Science Unit. p.2 </li></ul><ul><li>What other examples do you know? </li></ul>
    7. 8. ACADEMIC VS. COMMON WORDS <ul><li>encounter meet </li></ul><ul><li> observe watch </li></ul><ul><li> maintain keep </li></ul><ul><li> ultimate last </li></ul><ul><li> equal same </li></ul><ul><li> entire whole </li></ul><ul><li> quantity amount </li></ul><ul><li> subtract minus </li></ul>
    8. 9. <ul><li>In three more years, Miguel’s grandfather will be six times as old as Miguel was last year. When Miguel’s present age is added to his grandfather’s present age, the total is 68. </li></ul><ul><li>How old is each one now? </li></ul><ul><li>(Word Problem 1 of Math Unit p.6) </li></ul>
    9. 10. <ul><li>Passive : </li></ul><ul><li>Water is moved across the large intestine wall. </li></ul><ul><li>Cause-Effect: </li></ul><ul><li>The fewer the number of hydrogens on a carbon-carbon bond, the more oxidized the bond. </li></ul><ul><li>(See Science Unit pp. 2-3) </li></ul>
    10. 11. TYPES OF ACADEMIC LANGUAGE #2-THINKING SKILL TERMS <ul><li>Terms that describe and facilitate higher level thinking. Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>the difference between </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>the probability of it is higher than </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>it boils down to </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>it is similar to </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>it falls under the category of </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>in this way </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>if….were </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>from the point of view of … </li></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 12. <ul><li>These are sets of words or phrases that glue ideas together, support transitions, logical conjunctives, propositions, etc. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>such as but and </li></ul><ul><li>or while despite </li></ul><ul><li>although yet for instance </li></ul><ul><li>but and while despite although yet </li></ul><ul><li>given that if </li></ul>
    12. 13. <ul><li>Language used to cultivate and facilitate academic discussions in and outside of class. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>My idea is related to John’s in that… </li></ul><ul><li>I concur with what she said </li></ul><ul><li>You made a great point about…. </li></ul><ul><li>I haven’t thought in those terms… </li></ul><ul><li>My idea supports Susan’s premise… </li></ul><ul><li>I’d like to piggyback onto your idea </li></ul><ul><li>Along those same lines, I think… </li></ul>
    13. 14. LEARNING THE UNKNOWN
    14. 15. <ul><li>Be cognizant of the existence of ELLs in your class. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sensitive to their diverse needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Attend to their emotional needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Attend to their linguistic needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Attend to their academic needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Open your minds to new ideas, strategies, and techniques. </li></ul><ul><li>Work collaboratively. </li></ul>
    15. 16. Learning is Socially Constructed http://teachvu.vu.msu.edu/public/designers/media_assets/socialContext.jpg
    16. 18. THE NEXT LEVEL OF DEVELOPMENT http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/graphics/zpd.GIF
    17. 19. ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT http:// http://thebrain.mcgill.ca/flash/i/i_09/i_09_p/i_09_p_dev/i_09_p_dev_2b.jpg
    18. 20. http://www.weac.org/graphics/2005-06/sept05/buehl.jpg
    19. 21. ZONE OF PROXIMAL DEVELOPMENT http://csusap.csu.edu.au/~mross11/Artefacts/ZonePD.jpg
    20. 22. A SCAFFOLD: A TEMPORARY STRUCTURE TO PROVIDE SUPPORT
    21. 23. THE BENEFITS OF SCAFFOLDING http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/spring61/scaffolding.gif
    22. 24. SCAFFOLDING STRATEGIES <ul><li>1. Paraphrase (define) </li></ul><ul><li>2. Highlight (notice) </li></ul><ul><li>3. Model (mini-lesson) </li></ul><ul><li>4. Encourage (output) </li></ul><ul><li>5. Praise (support) </li></ul><ul><li>6. Validate (positive reinforcement) the </li></ul><ul><li>use of academic language. </li></ul>
    23. 25. <ul><li>He committed an egregious error – a very bad mistake . </li></ul><ul><li>The liquid becomes effervescent — bubbly, full of bubbles —when we stir it. </li></ul>
    24. 26. EFFECTIVE ESL TECHNIQUES <ul><li>Create a supportive and facilitative learning environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Use scaffolding techniques effectively. </li></ul>
    25. 27. GROUP ACTIVITY: SCAFFOLDING <ul><li>Choose a scaffolding activity in the Math and Science Units. Discuss how you would use the activity to teach your current ELL students or future ELL students. </li></ul><ul><li>Math Teachers: pp.8-20 </li></ul><ul><li>Science Teachers: pp.5-22 </li></ul>
    26. 28. http://durandus.com/images/zoped/zoped1.jpg
    27. 29. BACKGROUND SCHEMA http://www.laspositascollege.edu/RAW/images/schema.jpg
    28. 30. USING BACKGROUND SCHEMA IN EVERYDAY LIFE
    29. 31. <ul><li>Math Teachers: </li></ul><ul><li>Read the mini lesson plan in the Math Unit </li></ul><ul><li>pp.22-23 </li></ul><ul><li>Science Teachers: </li></ul><ul><li>Read the mini lesson plan in the Science Unit </li></ul><ul><li>pp.23-25 </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate background schema into your lesson plan. (See the next slide.) </li></ul>
    30. 32. <ul><li>Background Schema: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Students’ Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>2. Students’ Experience </li></ul><ul><li>3. Students’ Interest </li></ul>
    31. 33. <ul><li>Students will learn best what they want and need to know. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowing how to learn is more important than acquiring many facts. </li></ul><ul><li>Feelings are as important as facts. </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn best in a non-threatening environment. </li></ul><ul><li>Gage and Berliner (1991) </li></ul>
    32. 34. mind body emotions spirit
    33. 37. Self-Awareness  Self-Control  Self-Motivation  Empathy  Social Skills Peter Salovery, Yale John Meyer New Haven Reuven Bar-On, Israeli Daniel Goleman Writer
    34. 38. <ul><li>What do I differentiate? </li></ul><ul><li>Sources (what to teach), process (how to teach) and product (what to expect). </li></ul><ul><li>What criteria do I use to select all three? </li></ul><ul><li>Readiness, interest, and learning styles. </li></ul><ul><li>What principles guide my planning? Meaningful tasks, flexible grouping, ongoing assessment and adjustment. </li></ul><ul><li>Rothenberg & Fisher (2007) </li></ul>
    35. 39. <ul><li>Advanced Learners : </li></ul><ul><li>Students write a short report about the conservation of water instead of a paragraph about their interviews. </li></ul><ul><li>Struggling Learners : </li></ul><ul><li>Students write five sentences instead of a paragraph. </li></ul><ul><li>(Science Unit Lesson: p.25) </li></ul>
    36. 40. <ul><li>Create a scaffolding activity for struggling and advanced learners to be used in the mini lessons: </li></ul><ul><li>Math Teachers: pp.22-23 </li></ul><ul><li>Science Teachers:pp.23-25 </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiating Instruction: </li></ul><ul><li>Advanced Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>Struggling Learners: </li></ul>
    37. 41. <ul><li>Creating a supportive and facilitative learning environment </li></ul><ul><li>Effective use of scaffolding techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Providing comprehensible input </li></ul><ul><li>Checking comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Using cooperative learning strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Developing literacy and second language skills </li></ul><ul><li>Developing individual learning strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Using more Gru-Vi-Mo-Ma-Mu in lessons </li></ul>
    38. 42. <ul><li>Gru - group work and cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Vi - visuals, such as pictures, graphs, diagrams, acronyms, charts, graphic organizers </li></ul><ul><li>Mo - movement, such as hand motions, gestures, moving around the room, whole body simulations, role-plays, dramas, experiential learning </li></ul><ul><li>Ma - manipulatives, or use of tactile or hands-on learning </li></ul><ul><li>Mu - music, songs, chants, rhythms </li></ul>
    39. 43. <ul><li>Does everyone understand? </li></ul><ul><li>Vary inquiry techniques. </li></ul><ul><li>Make students active listeners. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Pre-Pair” to respond. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow extra time. </li></ul><ul><li>Give credit for trying. </li></ul><ul><li>Offer face savers. </li></ul><ul><li>Watch for readiness. </li></ul>
    40. 44. <ul><li>QTEL - Q uality T eaching for E nglish L earners (West Ed) </li></ul><ul><li>SIOP - S heltered I nstruction O bservation P rotocol </li></ul><ul><li>CALLA - C ognitive A cademic L anguage L earning A pproach </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated Instruction – Individualized Instruction </li></ul>
    41. 45. <ul><li>Series of Professional Development Institutes in Math, Science, Social Studies, and ELA created by WestEd. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis: scaffolding academic language and content </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Elements of QTEL Scaffolding: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>bridging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>schema building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>contextualization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>metacognitive development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.wested.org/cs/tqip/print/docs/qt/home.htm </li></ul></ul>
    42. 46. <ul><li>Language and content objectives are systematically woven into lesson plans. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers adjust their English to make content comprehensible. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a high level of student engagement and interaction. </li></ul><ul><li>Affective factors are taken into consideration. </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple pathways are offered. </li></ul><ul><li>Supplementary materials are used to support academic text . </li></ul><ul><li>Echevarria, Vogt and Short (2004) </li></ul>
    43. 47. <ul><li>Language development - focus on academic language </li></ul><ul><li>Content area instruction - discovery and hands-on approach </li></ul><ul><li>Explicit instruction of learning strategies - metacognitive awareness, modeling, practice, and transfer </li></ul><ul><li> Chamot and O’Malley (1994) </li></ul>
    44. 48. <ul><li>Chamot, A. U., & O'Malley, J. M. (1996). The Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach (CALLA): A model for linguistically diverse classrooms. The Elementary School Journal, 96(3), 259-273. </li></ul><ul><li>Echevarria, Vogt and Short (2004) Echevarria, J., Vogt, M. E., and Short, D. J. (2004). Making content comprehensible for English </li></ul><ul><li>learners: The SIOP model. (2 </li></ul><ul><li>nded.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>) </li></ul>
    45. 49. <ul><li>Gage, N., & Berliner, D. (1991). Educational psychology (5th ed.). Boston: Houghton, Mifflin. </li></ul><ul><li>Rothenberg, R. & Fisher, D., (2007). Teaching English language learners: A differentiated approach. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill – Prentice Hall. </li></ul>

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