Leadership stress

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Leadership stress

  1. 1. Leadership Stress: An In-depth Look at How Stress Can Impact Leaders and Organizations Sherry Perkins VP Enterprise Solutions Services June 27, 2012
  2. 2. Introducing Profiles InternationalWho We Are – Employee assessment specialists Profiles International: A High-level Overview • Founded in 1991 •World Leaders in Assessment Solutions • Delivered more than 45M assessments to •40,000 organizations across •Numerous Industry Sectors in •122 Countries and in Profiles International Founders Jim Sirbasku, CEO, and •33 languages Bud Haney, President www.profilesinternational.com Introducing Profiles International | 2
  3. 3. Your Facilitator Scheherazade Perkins, M.A. Organizational DevelopmentV.P. Enterprise Solutions Services 30 Years Experience Technology/Management/HR Business Owner Chair Waco WIB Alliance SCORE Counselor UOP Management Instructor sherry.perkins@profilesmail.com 254-399-5517
  4. 4. About the Author• David Creelman• Author of “Leadership  as  an  HR  Risk”  (HR.Com Research Paper)• Management Consultant (International Experience)• MBA from the University of Western Ontario• B.S. Chemistry/Bio Chemistry from McMaster
  5. 5. Learning ObjectivesAudienceThis webinar is designed for business owners, executives, strategicmanagers and business professionals who want to understand more aboutthe impact of stress in the life of a leader and the role of the organization inthe managing stress levels for its leaders.Learning Objectives:• Describe stress levels in terms of its positive and negative impact on leader performance and effectiveness.• Evaluate stress levels among leaders within their organizations in terms of predictive stress indicators.• Set in place actions to anticipate and proactively eliminate the effect of destructive stress levels among leaders within their organizations.
  6. 6. Let’s  Take  a  Pulse.• On average, how much stress do you experience in a typical work week? – About right – A little more than reasonable – Entirely too much
  7. 7. How about another pulse check.• Any body else in your situation would probably have. . . – Resigned – Resorted to Heavy Medication – Refused to Play
  8. 8. Why Do People Live With Unreasonable Stress?• They  don’t  think   they have any other options.• They enjoy living dangerously.• They  don’t   recognize the danger/downside of stress.
  9. 9. Reality of Stress and Leadership• Natural – A Part of Life as a Leader (Entry Fee to the Club).• Can Be Costly.• It’s  predictable,  measureable,  manageable   and frequently avoidable.Creelman ( May, 2012)
  10. 10. Gallup Five Essential Elements of Wellbeing• Career Well-being (your time)• Social Well-being (your relationships)• Financial Well-being ( your economic life)• Physical Well-being ( your health)• Community Well-being ( your engagement in the community)Gallup Interview with Rath and Harter (May, 2012)
  11. 11. Gallup Poll Results • Higher Well-being = 41% lower health-related costs • 60-year olds with higher well-being = 30-year olds with lower well-being • Higher well-being = 35% lower turnover rate Gallup Interview with Rath and Harter (May, 2012)
  12. 12. Annual Health-Related Cost To Employer 14,000 12,000 $11,709 10,000 8,000 $7,388 6,000 62% 4,000 $4,395 41% 2,000 0 Suffering Struggling Thriving Gallup Interview with Rath and Harter (May, 2012)
  13. 13. Risks of Stress and Leadership 1. Loss of senior talent due to burn-out 2. Deteriorating Engagement in the department 3. Bad decision makingDavid Creelman, 2012. www.hr.com
  14. 14. Enhancing Your Leadership Charisma: A Step-by-Step GuideEngagement = Productivity & Profitability“…we  looked  at  fifty  global  companies  over  a  year,  correlating  employee   engagement levels with financial results...“The  companies with high employee engagement had a 19% increase in operating income and 28% growth in earnings per share. Conversely, companies with low levels of engagement saw operating income drop more than 32% and earnings per share  decline  11%.” Source:  Towers  Perrin  ‘Global  Workforce  Study’ (surveyed nearly 90,000 employees in 18 countries) Enhancing Your Leadership Charisma: A Step-by-Step Guide |
  15. 15. Enhancing Your Leadership Charisma: A Step-by-Step GuideEngagement = Productivity & Profitability …which  equates  to: …a  51%  Gap  in  Operating  Income! …a  39%  Gap  in  Earnings  per  Share! …between  high  and  low  engagement  organizations Source:  Towers  Perrin  ‘Global  Workforce  Study’)) (surveyed nearly 90,000 employees in 18 countries. Enhancing Your Leadership Charisma: A Step-by-Step Guide |
  16. 16. Stress Model http://www.mindtools.com/stress/UnderstandStress/StressPerformance.htm
  17. 17. Study Finds Boredom can Actually Kill You Rajshri on February 09, 2010 Researchers from University College London interviewed more than 7,500 people aged between 35 to 55 years in a three year period from 1985 to 1988. Last year, the researchers followed up on the study andfound that almost 40 percent of those who admitted to feeling great deal of boredom had died. Read more: Study Finds Boredom can Actually Kill You | MedIndia http://www.medindia.net /news/Study-Finds-Boredom-can-Actually-Kill-You-64822-1.htm#ixzz1yAgySr00
  18. 18. Risks of Stress and Leadership1. Loss of senior talent due to burn-out2. Deteriorating Engagement in the department3. Bad decision makingDavid Creelman, 2012. www.hr.com
  19. 19. Decision-making Is Difficult to Isolate• Poorly thought-out• Irrational (based on erroneous information)• Erratic (unpredictable)• Slow (Analysis paralysis)• Half-baked, short-sighted• Lack integrity, unethical• Lack compassion, people- sensitivity• Non-existent (no decision is a decision)
  20. 20. Reality of Stress and Leadership• Natural – A Part of Life as a Leader (Entry Fee to the Club).• Can Be Costly.• It’s  predictable,  measureable,  manageable   and frequently avoidable.Creelman ( May, 2012)
  21. 21. Key Points1. Loss of Senior Talent Due to Burn-out – Pre-mature Attrition – Health Care Costs – Decision-Making Impaired2. Deteriorating Engagement in the Department – Lower Performance, Productivity and Profitability3. Stress Levels Must Be BalancedDavid Creelman, 2012. www.hr.com
  22. 22. Assessing Risk (How Much is Too Much?) http://www.depression-anxiety-stress-test.org/take-the-test.html
  23. 23. Assessing Risk (How Much is Too Much?) http://www.depression-anxiety-stress-test.org/take-the-test.html
  24. 24. Risk Mitigation Programs Emergency Response• Stress Management Training • Employee Assistance Programs• “Ten  Minute  Fitness” • Coaches• Good habits • Group Interventions/Focus – Take a break Groups – Exercise – Think before Accepting Work – Create Predictable Time Off
  25. 25. Clearly definedRisk Mitigation Expectations understood Expectations reasonable Work pace Predictable Supervision provided Penalty for error? Self The Job The Boss Environment
  26. 26. Risk Mitigation How do you learn? How do you work? What do you enjoy? What motivates you? What frustrates you? What is your greatest fear? Self The Job Are your talents being fully utilized? The Boss Environment
  27. 27. Risk Mitigation Self The Job What  is  the  boss’   The leadership style? Boss Environment How effective is the communication between you? How comfortable are you in being candid with the boss? How candid is the boss with you?
  28. 28. Risk Mitigation Self The Job The Boss EnvironmentWork stabilitySilos and clicks?Informal pecking order?Innovation encouraged?
  29. 29. Risk Mitigation Clearly defined How do you learn? Expectations understood How do you work? Expectations reasonable What do you enjoy? Work pace What motivates you? Predictable Are your talents Self The Job Supervision provided being fully utilized? Penalty for error? FIT The Boss EnvironmentWork stabilitySilos and clicks?Informal pecking order? Leadership styleInnovation encouraged? Leadership communication Candor / Trust
  30. 30. The Real You What I can What the expect employee from the will need employee. from me.
  31. 31. The Real You What I can What the expect employee from theFIT will need employee. from me.
  32. 32. Using Assessments to Predict Behavior PPI Report PTA Report
  33. 33. What Can Assessments Tell Us About People? What I can What will expect theyneed from from us? them?
  34. 34. PPI Individual Graph
  35. 35. Stages of Concern Model Improve or Choose Better Collaboration or Solution Implementation Consequences Management Personal InformationalAwareness Scale 4(C ) Scale 3 (S) Scale 2 (I ) Scale 1 (D) Concerns Based Adoption Model (CBAM), Hall and Rutherford (1979) Retrieved from http://www.techlearning.com/article/42264
  36. 36. Sample Team AnalysisDISCDISCDISC Numbers represent members of the team. The team represents the team leader. The 3 represents a new team member.
  37. 37. Reality of Stress and Leadership• Natural – A Part of Life as a Leader (Entry Fee to the Club).• Can Be Costly.• It’s  predictable,  measureable,  manageable   and frequently avoidable.Creelman ( May, 2012)
  38. 38. Key Points1. Stress Levels Can Be Measured.2. Stress Levels Can Be Managed. – Assessments – FIT3. Stress Levels Can Be Avoided. – Predictive Models – Individual and Team AnalysisDavid Creelman, 2012. www.hr.com
  39. 39. Learning ObjectivesAudienceThis webinar is designed for business owners, executives, strategicmanagers and business professionals who want to understand more aboutthe impact of stress in the life of a leader and the role of the organization inthe managing stress levels for its leaders.Learning Objectives:• Describe stress levels in terms of its positive and negative impact on leader performance and effectiveness.• Evaluate stress levels among leaders within their organizations in terms of predictive stress indicators.• Set in place actions to anticipate and proactively eliminate the effect of destructive stress levels among leaders within their organizations.
  40. 40. What’s  Next?   • Survey your organization to determine the level of engagement of your workforce? • Examine your team for pockets of imbalance and high stress levels? • Assess  one  of  your  leader’s  to   determine the sources of stress and measures needed to counteract.
  41. 41. Who Wants a FreeLeader Assessment? Yes / No
  42. 42. Questions ?
  43. 43. Contact Us Profiles Assessment Asia (Pte.) Limited An Authorized Strategic Business Partner of Profiles International14 , Robinson Road, #08-01A, Far East Finance,Singapore 048545Email: info@profiles.com.sgTelephone: 65717031Fax: 63334636Website: http://www.profiles.com.sg Share , Connect and Follow Us Know your people..Grow your business
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